Windows IoT #2: Creating, running & debugging with Pi hardware from VS (Getting Started Series)



hi and welcome back to another episode of visual studio tool box I'm back with my guest Suze Hinton hi Suze welcome to show again hey thanks for having me back yeah so we're here we're doing a series on Windows IOT core development and Souza's back to do episode 2 out of that series and what are we gonna talk about today yeah so today we're actually gonna run our very first Windows IOT core UWP app which is really exciting and it the app that we're going to run it blinks an LED and an LED is just like a little light that you can plug into your breadboard and because a lot of IOT projects don't necessarily have like a visual screen or any kind of graphics we like to consider the blinky LED to be like the hello world of of like an electronics project so normally you're printing to a console or something like that but in electronics the blinking light means okay everything seems to be working awesome and in the previous episode this is episode 2 out of our series you know we talked about some of the fundamentals right we right we said what's a breadboard how does it all the hardware all work together what programming language can you use how do you build for it so we did a lot of the conversational pieces so people should go watch the episode of day one but here we're actually gonna jump individuals to do right this is the first time and from this episode forward it's all about you know running visual studio and doing something with the devices so it's exciting yeah we're gonna sort of prove that there's no smoke and mirrors it really is just normal visual studio development yeah yeah awesome all right well let's jump right into it then so I have the Microsoft Windows IOT core samples repository up and this is on github and you can clean this down to get started with it we have a lot of samples to start with we are gonna just start with the blinky one and so when you when you have a look at the documentation it helps you there are really friendly links on how to get started and things like that and actually how to use the samples themselves awesome so people watching this and then go ahead we'll put a little link in the shows they can download this exact sample specifically in the look at other samples totally so in the samples directory there's the whole list there and we're just going to be using like hello blinky so that's what we'll be using today and then we just need to read the code find out you know in the readme where to plug in the led and things like that and then we're all good to go okay awesome and there's also great documentation right behind this platform so working go for that yet so you can go to doc stop Microsoft comm which is where all of our Doc's live and we have an entire section on Windows IOT core and getting started with it and we have a lot of really cool sections including tutorials and things like that so usually I recommend that people click on the get started link and that explains exactly what it is gives a little more detail than we gave in the last episode and it also gives you a list of devices that are compatible and things like that which is really cool so definitely check that out just to familiarize yourself with the process of getting up and running because we are skipping a few of those steps today awesome yeah and we did talk about like device compatibility being important the last episodes don't really think she'd like check that episode on they've never done this before and yes they would make it start making it real ok awesome so let's jump into the sample then go to visual studio and why don't you introduce to us what we're doing here what we're looking at right so I'm just opening the main page you know demo and we have the the actual class with code as you can see here it doesn't really look particularly different from a regular uwp up in a solution you know we have our packaged app manifest and and our app demo and everything that you would normally see we also have our demo file itself which shows that we're setting up a UI as well yeah awesome simple simple little UI there's just it's just sam'l like you would expect it and and the only thing different for like regular people that have experience with WPF or uwp or anything else samo base like platform wise is that we're targeting arm on top right that's the one conversion a stands out everything else look like regular code but the the build target the platform we're targeting yeah so when you have a look here at debug this is what you'll see that normally you wouldn't see that but that's what we set everything up to be and we have templates in visual studio which gets you started with like an app from scratch if you'd prefer not to use a sample and it should set all of that stuff up for you – ok awesome and now you have next to the run button says remote machine right because you actually need to debug against a remote device that's one of the things I learned that talked about in the previous episode like there's no emulator you've got a like either have an arm device I mean maybe that could work in the future we are getting the devices for Windows now but let's assume you're like me you all your devices are not armed your ear as berry pie in this case our device with the arm and that's our target that's that's why you need to run and run this code to debug it on the remote machine right so how does that even work how does it connect to the PI device yeah so there are several ways to connect your device and usually the most straightforward way that I recommend at the beginning is to use Ethernet because then you've got just a direct connection from your development laptop or your development desktop to the actual Raspberry Pi itself you can actually access it as long as both computers are on the same network though yeah so you don't necessarily have to be directly tethered but usually I recommend that just so that it's really easy for discoverability and things like that what it does is it'll build your app and then it actually just copies that package over and it tells like Windows to start running that Apple and on the Raspberry Pi itself so it's literally like a one-click yeah deployment runs deployed debug scenario right the thing you expect like on Windows as well right now we're back like I'm Windows Phone development or any other kind of remote device to ever development that that's pretty cool and it knows which device to target based on the IP address of the device right that's what it's using internally or guess I can use host name as well I like IP addresses I think it simplifies my life the other thing that I found useful is that you know when I when I got my PI home the first like a moment like frustration I had was I actually didn't have any adapter to direct ever it like yeah you're using an adapter right right now we talked about that device because I didn't have that yeah and if you don't have that then you need something else we'll talk about the regular way I did it but how did you get it to work here yeah so normally when I'm debugging this from home I have like this PI hooked it's like into my router and so then I can access it just through they look 100 so if it's plugged into to a router over-regulate for Ned yes it will just work because that's your home local network your debug machines Network as well then you have this as the alternative mobile setup yeah so this is a direct tethering so I have a really fancy laptop and it's a little too thin to have like an entire thin at point to fin yeah and so the way that I got around that was I bought like a USB to Ethernet adapter and that works really really well and so I just you know bought mine off and it was plug-and-play and so I found that that's been the easiest way for me to do it when I'm out and about and debugging things even though I get strange looks when I'm trying to do this at the airport the board yeah so I tend to try and be discreet and have that all in my backpack but then I can have this nice cable here and still be developing which is really convenient yeah what's your technique yeah I mean so it might take negate that was to give you a router setting that router a little be like in an apartment where they gave me wiring in the walls bowed to the internet so that was easy yeah that fancy right so I think like I didn't have a router I used to have a router always in my life except the last couple of years when I exactly started this so I went to Best Buy but her outer and like you said that just works great because they gave me a local network to to attach to and it the Raspberry Pi can connect to wireless like you could connect it to your wireless that does work but that's next level of complexity I actually like the physical connection for the beginning and then you can configure it to work off a hotspot or whatever but this is the first easiest way to go yeah totally and once you're actually done debugging and things you don't need to be tethered like this anymore right so you would actually like package up an actual release you can then deploy it to the device and then the device has really nice abstractions through like a portal that you can access to just set up what is the startup app and then that means that every time you turn on your PI instead of starting up the default app which we've been working with it'll just start your own you WP up so it's really really nice once you actually do become untethered awesome so let's talk about a couple of those apps and maybe we didn't plan originally to talk about them but I think it's important the cavern number again am I getting started that I realized that there's this whole suite of apps that you can get from us from Microsoft that lets you first of all you can get the device working so you buy a micro SD card right you need to plug it into some laptop that's running this piece of software maybe you can start that the dashboard manager and show people what the piece of software looks like yeah and then the dot Thea software lets you just configure you know windows on the card so you can actually you can even configure the preview version of Windows with the main one for Windows IOT core and then you pull that card you plug it into your pie and your pipe boots up magically yeah and that's kind of the two-step process but I didn't realize they're like yes in scratch I was like how do I get this microSD card to have Windows on a doing X copier do I know doesn't app we ship an app for you yeah it's so so easy because I know with like general raspberry pi stuff you know you can buy SD cards with software pre-loaded on it and so it would be ridiculous if we asked people would have to go through all that trouble so I was really pleasantly surprised by just clicking one button with my SD card plugged in and then it just deployed the exact copy of Windows that I needed and then you turn the PI own in it and it works so I can definitely show you that dashboard cool so let's take a look at it now so if I bring up the IOT dashboard which is the app that we just mentioned I can already see that my Raspberry Pi is plugged in this is the IP address so that I know how to connect that to Visual Studio for debugging and deployment which is really cool now I like to call my stuff like with a prefix of new or Noah because my name on the Internet is Noah cat so that's why mine's code new PI you can name it whatever you want and and then it shows you the IP address and the exact OS version so I give you some rich information as long as you can you can also show you like is your PI being detected on the local net rekt ever or local home internet and this is the same app that we would also use to set up the new device right there's like a tab here click on it and it's just magical and then what I found out we don't have to show this in detail here but like what I found out if you sign in and the bottom left you if your window insiders you start seeing insider builds it's the same thing if you oh like that blue link sign in as windows insider so by having your identity you can get internal builds but I mean I started and I still use actually the RTM build I don't I don't skip ahead I'm not that advanced but this thing will download it install it give it a name give it a password and then you just pull the card out plug it into your pie exactly harbor's compatible with that OS version it works yeah it's really awesome and so that's literally as easy as it is you fill out the details you download and install it'll tell you when you're done and then you just eject the SD card from your computer plug it into the PI and then you'll see the windows icon show up on a little screen if you have it plugged in which blew my mind you know I'm not used to seeing that on like a hardware device yeah yeah it's really cool and and the fact that you have a screen attached over regular HDMI all you needed right so in fact you could hook this up to a big screen and I've done that right like it's just HDMI it's just Windows totally in a big way and then you have some advanced hardware we touch and stuff you can add later but the beginning you can start with like like you can scavenge at home like I was right then I took my HDMI spare monitor I plugged it in to the PI that was my first getting it to work then I bought a fancy screen like you don't have to buy a lot of stuff to get started just the board and some spare equipment a lot of us have yeah I feel like everyone has that owed monitor laying around that like it's too small or it's like not nice anymore because you bought a new fancy one and I find that that's like awesome for use with the PI official yeah and you can plug in a keyboard and a mouse in to get high and then you can control the app that you just built and deployed so that's what I did at home and actually wound up not having a keyboard that I could plug in so I did that at the bike keyboard but then I I remembered I had a Bluetooth keyboard yeah and I found that that works with the device so you can use bluetooth mouse Bluetooth keyboard regular USB mouse and keyboard it's Windows it's kind of magical that's that's the one thing that I think takes this for Microsoft developers kind of the next level of ease it's so true yeah a lot of the drivers that you would kind of be expecting to be on like regular Windows that because it's really just an optimized version of Windows 10 which is great yeah that's awesome all right so let's go back to visual studio and maybe take a look on kind of how do you start how do you how do you like run code against the device how does the configuration for the IP address look that sort of thing it didn't be interesting yeah absolutely so you do have to do a little bit of work to kind of set up this remote machine and it's it should be in your regular debug settings and so if you go in you should see this thing right here that says blinky properties and so I'm going to go back into that it works the same if you right-click on yours and your project so this yeah goes in so some of the debug tab I feel like I feel like you're like the power user visual studio and so many years back back from the days before it was called Visual Studio so yes I have an advantage awesome so you can see there there are a lot of different options you don't necessarily need to have to worry about all of them the most important part here is in the start options in the middle here so you can see the target device is needs to be set to a remote machine the remote machine at the IP address is definitely like the best way to go about this and you can grab that IP address directly from the IOT dashboard that we showed earlier it is easy and also under paid so if you can also see the IP address of us yeah and that's really nice so there is a default app that's us on the PI that gives you actual information about that so that should be all that you need to get up and running and a lot of the time you know this stuff is already part of the template so usually you only need to fill in the remote machine details and then you good to go ok what else can we talk about all right so what are we sure would actually like hitting a breakpoint I think that's oh yes part so we have it set to arms so we know it's gonna build to the right platform we already configured the IP address so we did that and it really wasn't much else you probably had to do that kind of is the default as long as the device can be seen so now we just hit f5 right yeah this is scary but yeah so yeah so we set a breakpoint pretty early on in the in the app and I'm happy to explain how the the code works later on but it should hit this point and it should do that remotely so you you normally would be expecting that it's coming from the emulator or from your actual desktop but you're actually going to start seeing details that are specific to the PI including you know all of the monitoring and things like that so if I hit f5 now we should actually start seeing that building right so it's very very standard stuff you know Windows Windows developers will be familiar with it right you've got your outputs showing the build happening it's going to do the deployment I think you showed me a tip earlier it's actually going to show you the path in there of where on the PI it's pointed to if I learn something new that was cool it's very cool so this is normal right this is what you would normally see really oh my god mastix your outputs your locals everything you would expect as a c-sharp developer yeah and so this is actually showing you all of these kind of these metrics and the Diagnostics are actually for the PI so it's no for your laptop and then if you look in the output it's it's actually showing this is not my my left hopes like path at all and so this is this is the photo user account on the PI where it's actually deploying the app and running blinky exe which is really really cool yeah that's awesome and so basically you're running the app so like let's run the app let's see what it actually looks like in the device yeah so we started running it and it did actually halt at this breakpoint right here and so this looks as it normally would which is really cool and so let's say like the GPIO which is our general purpose input output this is this absolutely needs to be started up for us to even be able to like stop manipulating things on the breadboard right because that's what our devices are plugged into and so I can just regularly roll over my variables just to make sure that they did actually instantiate properly which is really really cool and then we can just keep continuing so that the app keeps running and you'll you'll see again that the Diagnostics thing can continue yeah and the apps actually started up so let's let's go over and see what is actually happening on the screen yeah and what's happening on the breadboard so this app is called blinky yeah which sort of gives away what I should be doing yeah well this is a minted or Hardware here on the screen yeah so if we take a look over here at the hard way we have our screen which has a very very attractive it has a very attractive app running I know that if I was friends with a designer I would actually be able to do a better job with this is the sample new people what they're gonna see right and so that red and white sort of cycling circle there is just an indicator that it is telling the LED to turn on and off and so that's just a visual reproduction of the 500 millisecond rate that we're doing that at and then if we come over and have a look at the breadboard we do have some pretty bright lights here but you should be able to see that there's a tiny little blue light and it is turning off and on and it's actually doing that in sync with a UI as well which is kind of reflecting that too it's awesome and so that's that's all the app does it starts up the GPIO so that it can then start toggling that LED and that's how hello world awesome so how does it like the breadboard has a bunch of places you can plug stuff into right so people might buy a kit that has a blinking light and it has some transistors and some wires and they might follow the instructions we layout right to plug it all in but then when you're looking at a code how do you relate the code knowing where you like something in and you something come in maybe you can jump into that see show up and show people yeah that's a really really good question and just to just to put the breadboard up in probably a slightly more accessible manitou before we begin we we do tend to create these diagrams without samples that show you how to plug everything in and so this here is the actual circuit that we're using if my computer was to start up yep and so this is this is a good wiring diagram because it shows you exactly where you need to plug what the why colors don't actually matter at all but it is helpful to have like the right resistor for example here and you have like columns and rows identified by letters and numbers right so – okay like I've missed that because it's gray it's a little bit weak and it's on the physical board it's on this diagram but that's how you know where they're telling you to plug it in so it's like a mystery and yes again once you learn about more about how Hardware works this will be less than mystify but when you first starting is terrifying you like what I get in why do I do i plug in both of the the little wires in there yes this shows you exactly the spot so followed 100% of you'll be exactly yeah so if you know once you get comfortable you'll be like well I don't want to put that LED on the left side of the breadboard I want to put it on the right and so you'll get more confident with like understanding how it works and everything but we try and make it super easy by giving you just like a very visual way of being able to follow that very reproducible and yes where did you get the hardware for this like the breadboard and the like the the Raspberry Pi it doesn't come with it by default right you have to you have to buy some of this stuff some of them were kids and yep that's right so I got mine as part of this kit here so this is the Microsoft IOT pack for Raspberry Pi 3 it is a collaboration that we have with Adafruit Adafruit it's one of my favorite companies in the world and they're also new york-based so I'm from New York less yeah I want to support local business there you go and so we've done some really really cool a jyoti collaborations with Adafruit and this is probably one of my favorite packs so this is the Microsoft IOT pack for Raspberry Pi you can actually choose to have what the Raspberry Pi come with it but if you already have a Raspberry Pi lying around and you've just shamefully never done anything with it and and this is feels like time to do so you can also just buy the pack alone it does come with some really cool really really cool like devices and bits and pieces that you can plug in including one of the senses that we're going to be using in this series and that comes with the breadboard and everything that you need to get started with so you don't need to hunt down anything if you're comfortable buying an entire pack then this is definitely the way to go okay awesome yeah I think mystifies some of it so let's go take a look at the code and see how does the code know what to do how does the code know which part of that board to actually interact with totally totally so I'm actually just going to stop this program just so that we're not distracted by everything or the Diagnostics so we have just our normal class where we're defining a lot of the variables that we're going to be using and you'll see that there's a curious one here which is an integer and the constant is called LED pin so does that give you any clues as to like what you think it does yeah I think that's how we know where it's plugged in right where we're gonna send the command exactly and so we see this integer five and that's how clue if we weren't like following that nice breadboard pizza if let's say like someone just gave you a random up and you had no instructions these are the kind of clues that you need to look for when it comes to hardware as to where you might need to plug that into can we show on the board like how we crawl a dead number 5 – the actual board 5 yes absolutely if maybe the camera can zoom in back to the board we can show people like what that looks like because to me this was very mysterious like let's bring it up to the full screen because this is hard to see a little bit and how do you know it's 5 on here yeah so normally you would would you you don't have to use this particular breakout that I'm using here you can plug stuff directly into the raspberry PI's GPIO which sounds like that was the way that you've been doing and I always say GPIO we mean we mean the pins on the PI that are currently blocked by the fact that we plugged the big cable and yet the GPIO keep like to me none of this was obvious what I was translating what the GPIO cable what's a GPIO port oh my PI has a GPIO thing yes that's what it is and we're just enabling the breadboard to be its extension now beginning you more right more pluggable things and we have this number 5 so how does that correlate yep totally so the the road that there's like a double row of pins going along the side of the Raspberry Pi and then if you use this breakout which sometimes it's called a cobbler because PI yeah it's really cool um this just allows me to work directly on the breadboard and I don't have to keep crossing back between the pie and the breadboard but every single one of the the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi has been broken out and labeled on this breakout board here and so you can see there's there should be a bunch of numbers that are running all along each one so that you can easily just look for the number 5 and that's where we need to plug it in and so it's very small for you to see here but I do have the red wire plugged in and because remember these copper lines kind of go vertical I can just pop one in at one of the locations that you know is right across from pin 5 where the where it's labeled and that's really all there is to it that's how you plug it in and how do you know to plug in the other wire you have there because you have a black wire which is the ground yes that's something I've learned again I I know that people electronics like literally I'm very new be something like why do we need a ground cable and how do we know where which one of these to plug it in and I and I and tell me if I'm wrong or right but I remember I think reading that certain pins are designated as ground and that's just why that's the one that works yes multiple of them and the diagram you had before shows you which one you can use but you can use any ground for the black and the red has to go to measure number in the constant and the app totally yeah so it's really good to explain this so there are a date does tend to be like multiple grounds on a lot of boards such as there are three pi Oh the Arduino and that's mostly just for convenience especially if you don't have a breadboard you can kind of have multiple devices plugged into ground because it is kind of like the common default for every device to use right and so by plugging things into grounds we're actually giving we're closing the circuit to actually give the electricity like a path to run across so if we sent power to this led we didn't have a ground then nothing would actually move because there's no motivation for our our circuit to actually like start being powered and so that's why we always need a ground and you can think about pin 5 as like a remote controllable power source if that makes sense and so you could either say that pin is sending the pin 5 is sending power or you can say it's not sending power and that's what completes or doesn't complete that's okay right and then from the wires you have set up there you you sort of translate that's five into a different spot which matches where the light is and that's how the light turns on it's not actually for the light in the right places so that's kind of like it's old black magic until you realize that the wire the wire on the breadboard from one place to another connects that five and ground to where the light is and therefore the white could have been somewhere else like you said right there's this you once you get more advanced you can move the light around and stuff but like if you follow this configuration it will work it will get light on you'll get the basics and then this code will actually run and if you connect it to six instead of five you can just change that constant and that's fine and you can change where the ground is connected as long as that's a ground location you can't connect ground to power yeah I've heard people even breaking some of their like devices so it's really scary yeah so you have to be careful like I tell people you mean people to Windows IIT the one thing to remember is you are getting to the like that level of power not over over you use the word powers power the power of power but the power of power is it can break stuff absolutely like stuff in the right place double check that make sure before you send power to it in other words like if your pie is unplugged and your board your your boards connected your breadboard into the pie it doesn't have magical power source of any kind so it's kind of safe you can move things around once you plug that pie in you can break something totally make sure you're plugged in correctly yeah and I'm really cautious like I get worried that I'm just kind of like accidentally touch wire to a contact accidentally because I drop it on the pie or something so I tend to always unplug stuff when I'm moving things around on the breadboard like it takes like two seconds to plug it back in again but I really like what you said about double-checking everything like the measure twice cut once kind of thing I feel like that does actually give you a lot of safety in electronics and the LED even it has a ground wire and it has a like a power wire and so if you get them mocked around the wrong way it doesn't in this case it doesn't matter too much but you'll find that your circuit won't actually work because it's not in the right orientation got it so ask me how I know that you can burn something out oh yeah what does that bring something else I just I just plug stuff in the wrong places and I plugged power and that thing stopped working forever but did you feel like less afraid after that because you're like okay I messed it up that's out of the way now that's kind of how I felt but also gonna stupid that's why we're here we're trying to help folks not not to make mistakes and if you do these these things aren't that expensive right you go maybe or it's a little more than your wallet depending on situations but like it's not so bad and I've heard people of burning their boards out I've heard people stuff so I think probably the one thing it's kind of seifish yeah it's not a legal statement is your computer I don't think you can break your computer necessarily you plug in over a phone and stuff like that but from the board out it's you've got to know what you're doing so yes I'm careful maybe we can end by looking at the code itself so we know where to send it and we have this magical class for now people don't have to get the full understanding of it but the GPIO pin and value all of that is part of this like that black wires magic into the board and into the spot yes that's good enough so there's a class that we provide as a Windows IOT platform and then how do we how do we tell it to start blinking yeah so we just we can just use Windows so devices at GPIO it's ridiculously easy to just include that and start using it and so we need to define a the actual pin int that it's going to be on we create a pin and then we can also like create a pin value to be able to actually set it so that's sort of how we turn it on and off and the easiest thing for us to do is to just set up a timer so that you know every 500 milliseconds that actually runs that handler that we attach to it mm-hmm and so after initializing our GPIO which just means that we're opening our pin at pin 5 and then we set the pin belly to be high and high means we're sending power to it low means we're not sending power to it so it's a very binary thing so it's pretty easy to get your head around and then you know every every time we actually want to start writing that value to the pin that's where we can use our pin API and pin dot right okay so pen that writes rides the value and the value is that high value and the pin has been open to five so it already knows where to send that high value to yeah and then you that one more command said drive mode what is said drive mode yeah so that's a really good point so when we talk about like the abbreviation GPIO it's general purpose input output right so you know most of the pins can be either an input or an output so you can either read to it or read from it or you can write to it and so in this case we're saying like we want pin five that was setting up we want this pin to actually be an output so we actually like writing a value to it or sending power to it right so this magical combination it just is good it just works yeah in working with these pins tends to be you know kind of like the basic foundation to learn and from there you can kind of move up to like communication protocols and things like that Alyssa and so a handler which is our time attack is what takes care of doing the actual blinking itself and so this conditional will seem super familiar to you you know we're checking to see if the you know the current pin value is already set to high if it is then we want to set it low right so if the light is on we want to turn it off and so we then create a new pin value and write directly to that pin five and then we fill the little kind of circle the LED indicator on our UI with red and then if it's actually like already off then we want to turn it on and then we want to kind of update the UI accordingly as well so that's pretty that's pretty straightforward to get your head around yeah and you can start messing with the values and messing with the timer interval and making uplink really fast or really slow and that's sort of how you can sort of start getting to know some of these api's okay awesome do we want to show anything else in this episode I think that was it I think I think the the best thing is that you know you can remotely debug this so if if your DP IO doesn't start up for example you can just like kind of actually walk through and maybe see why that's happening you don't get that with most hardware like remote debugging is is such a treat to have yeah and so I just encourage people to set breakpoints and actually step through and actually watch how things are being like set up when the app starts running okay well awesome Suze well thank you so much for being on is showing is this you know Lex type of complexity people to get through and folks we hope you enjoyed this episode we'll have more of these episodes in the series on Windows IOT development and SUSE thank you so much for being in visual studio tool box hope to see you again yeah thanks for having me let's have even more fun next time definitely alright folks thank you very much see you next time bye bye

15 Comments

  1. DearJah said:

    I lost continence in anything Microsoft after the windows phone debacle, Microsoft are always using their competitor products like here they are using chrome instead of Edge or IE

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  2. Yves Poulin said:

    What about using VPN to really see the result GUI on PI

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  3. Yves Poulin said:

    Wich version of Visual Studio ?The free version of VS does not kmow about PI and GPIO …. do we need a SDK of some sort …Is WPF is the only way to go ?  What about WindForms !

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  4. kenneth ken Tan said:

    This is "really really COOL"

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  5. Tommy H. said:

    A very good demonstration. However the lad seems to be incredibly patronizing and creepy.

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  6. Jerzy Stachera said:

    How to develop .net core Apps for win10iot core with vs ?

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  7. Raspberry Pi said:

    Totally

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  8. Wilhelm From said:

    Hey Guys,
    its very interesting for me.
    After some time trying to run this iotApp on my Raspberry 3B i now know why iam get stuk in.
    Sometimes i get the "It is reserved by the system or in use for another function" Error. And even when not, this App is not working.
    Because: The "private const int LED_Pin = 5" IS NOT the Pin 5 on the Raspberry GPIO. But its the GPIOPIN5 located at the physical pin 29!!!
    And when you are using the pysical Pins 8 and 10, known as Gpio14 and 15 (also declared as TXD0 RXd0) you will receive the reserved Error.

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  9. Kash g said:

    I am trying to remote debug with python but there remote options are not there is there a way to do it with python.

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  10. Free Speech said:

    seems like useless without a dedicated desktop for it. I want to run my hardware test program in it…but without Gui i need to look for other OS for rasberry pi3. Why i need that? Miniaturization of testing platform.

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  11. Jay M said:

    If it could connect to MS SQL Server, it would be smoking hot!
    (else back to Linux which already has this capability for free)

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  12. João Paulo said:

    Very cool. I used Raspberry Pi 3 and Windows IoT along with a web system. I recorded two videos about the project, which I used as a Final Paper at college. You can check it by the following links (I'm from Brazil so both videos are in portuguese, but I think that it's simple to understand what is happening ^^):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cWA1uIe3oQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1d-yIOQOvU
    Website: https://dingsec.azurewebsites.net/
    PS: To develop the project we only use Microsoft technologies.

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  13. Timi Aiy said:

    YOU CAN BURN STUFF AND YOUR BOARD!!! NOOOOOOO!!!!!!

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  14. Lauri said:

    too general talking

    May 22, 2019
    Reply
  15. Ben Hayat said:

    Another great session.

    Beside Pi3, what other board is good and more powerful that MSFT has tested?

    May 22, 2019
    Reply

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