Trope Talk: Robots


Welcome to the wonderful world of science fiction! If you’re looking for robots, you’ve come to the right place. Good robots, bad robots, big robots, bigger robots, teeny-weeny nano robots, sexy robots, sassy robots, trash can robots, robots in disguise, people shaped robots, killer robots, marshmallow robots, neurotic robots, shiny robots, cute robots, sleek robots. Science fiction: We got the bots! So, there are a lot of robots in sci-fi… They’re honestly kind of a defining characteristic of the genre. When we look to the future at least the non-apocalyptic one, what we want to see is safe practical space travel, high-energy beam weapons, and robot meter maids. But robots hold a special place in science fiction a suspiciously Frankenstein shaped place because there’s nothing we love more than holding up a mirror to ourselves and seeing only the shiny shiny endoskeleton of our own unrelenting hubris staring back. What I’m saying is: we get weird about robots. Specifically about how their humanity, or lack thereof, mirrors our own. But before we unpack all the bizarre ways our robot narratives reflect our own bizarre species wide insecurities, let’s try and categorize our fictional robots a little. Now lots of robot narratives center on the question “how human is a robot?” And we will get back to that question, but for now our first category of robots is totally human robots. These characters are technically robots but functionally human beings. They can think, feel, philosophize, prioritize, hell in some universes they’ll explicitly have souls. A lot of the time these robots are alien in origin to help hand-wave why exactly they’re fully sentient beings. These robots usually get to basically do whatever they want on account of having total self-determination. The one exception I can think of are the droids in Star Wars, which all seem to at least have the potential for total sentience but are still universally a servant class with no rights. And the one time they made a character advocating for droid rights. It was played as a joke… Solo aside, these characters are generally immune to the humanity question, since they tend to be obviously sentient and usually have plots to focus on beyond “Contemplate your humanity.” Nobody’s gonna ask Optimus Prime to justify his personhood. Actually, maybe somebody should. That’d probably be a really soothing monologue, but I’d listen to him read the phone book. So. Anyway, one rung down the ladder is top tier artificial intelligence The robotic characters explicitly created by humans that are still functionally, basically human themselves in a number of key ways. These robots are theoretically just near-flawless imitations of humanity. But in practice this can very fuzzy. These characters might not technically have emotions, or maybe they’re not supposed to have emotions but for some reason they end up displaying things like love, anger, or self-preservation anyway. These top tier AI characters almost always get wrapped up in a storyline philosophizing about how human these near perfect human imitations are. They generally run into the old Turing test problem: if you can make a machine that’s indistinguishable from a human Can you consider it to really be a machine anymore? It’s almost inevitable that one of these guys will get put on trial or otherwise end up in conflict with the law. We’ll talk more about the inevitable robot racism thing later. Now midrange on the sliding scale of humanity that humanity or the robots like the Terminator in T2, who start off completely robotic but demonstrate the ability to learn a handful of human traits like smiling and stuff. These robots, while stilted, could theoretically develop to become indistinguishable from humans given enough time and adequate good examples. And this is where we start noticing what traits writers typically consider to be ‘human traits’ when deciding what these characters should and shouldn’t be capable of. These characters will typically lack a sense of humor, sarcasm, or subtlety and will appear generally emotionless, alerting the audience that these are all characteristics seen as central to humanity and we will get back to this too. Don’t worry, there’s a lot to unpack here… Knock Out: This is gonna be juicy~ Anyway, the last noteworthy entry on this scale is the far end of the inhumanity bell curve, the purely robotic robot. And this character archetype is basically always evil. These robots are emotionless, guided strictly by logic and their programming, and for some reason, 90% of the time their logic and programming guides them to murdering everyone. Since they’re not technically sentient, you could argue that they’re not evil because they’re not moral beings but they’re still usually antagonistic forces, like the inciting crisis in a disaster movie. Anyway, for whatever reason, usually a Perfectly Logical one, the purely robotic robot decides that humanity’s got to die, or something of that ilk, and hotter heads must prevail to change its mind or just unplug it from the wall outlet before it finds the nukes. The popularity of this concept is probably one of those dark reflections of humanity things meant to make you ponder humanity’s merits and flaws. Like, you look at the news on any given day and you’re like “god, everything’s on fire, maybe we should just let the world die.” And your Roomba’s off in the corner going like “Perameters recognized” and you have to real quick explain to it why maybe things aren’t apocalypse worthy just yet and some things are alright, actually and there’s this little thing called ‘hyperbole’ that humans like to do when they’re upset about their entire planet being on fire. So unsurprisingly the human to inhuman spectrum bijectively maps into the good versus evil spectrum because we are a very predictable species. Humans are emotional and compassionate whereas robots are cold and logical. The more human the robot, the more sympathetic it is to a human audience. The less human the robot, the more menacing and dangerous. Good robots equals Optimus Prime, bad robots equals Hal 9000. Now there are a number of plots that generally follow robot characters around. Typical plots include “how human is a robot: let’s get philosophical.” Or “humans played God making robots in our image. Let’s get philosophical – electric Boogaloo.” “We use robots for cheap mechanized labor, but now they’re sentient and want to be treated like people so we should probably just kill them before the blender starts getting ideas: let’s get philosophical three- Tokyo Drift” and the big favorite “robot racism” also known as “let’s get philosophical four- On Stranger Tides”. So the basic premise behind robot racism is that robots are sentient enough to be displeased with their lot in society and would like to be treated with some level of dignity. Not necessarily human dignity, but you know something approximating it. Frequently, they just don’t want to be property and they don’t want to be deactivated or killed. It’s a nuanced and complicated discussion of what it means to be deserving of personhood and respect with only the teensy problem that real racism exists See, there’s this much broader problem and basically all fantasy genres that try and use coding to draw parallels between a fictional social phenomenon and a real one. The intent here is to encourage your audience to see this familiar social dynamic from the real world reflected in an otherwise unfamiliar and fictional environment. The problem is the dynamic flows both ways. The readers will draw the connection between the real social phenomenon of the story but they’ll also Project the dynamics of the story back onto the real thing. And I’m not saying the audience is going to be like “Oh real-world marginalized groups are like robots”, but I am saying they’re gonna think you’re saying that and that is not a good thing. Just look at the hilarious backlash Detroit Become Human received for its ridiculously ham-fisted portrayal of a robot civil rights movement and how it seemed to reflect an incredibly poor understanding of the actual American civil rights movement on the part of the creator. Or, hell, just watch Lindsey Alice’s review of Bright. She’s got an excellent rundown of the problems writers run into when they try and make their in-universe racism logical or understandable for whatever reason when in real life, prejudice is a fundamentally irrational thing. The short of it is in Bright, orcs are fantasy black people and they are universally hated because 2000 years ago they sided with the Dark Lord in some big Lord of the Rings war which is the kind of coding that makes it seem like Maybe the writer doesn’t actually get how real racism works. The fundamental problem with this kind of coding when it comes to robots specifically, is in real life We are all people… Everyone is a human being regardless of any cosmetic disparity. Personhood is generally a pretty easy thing to define IRL. We’re all the same species without much internal variation when you get right down to it, but robots aren’t humans. Where real-world bigotry is unilaterally directed from one group of humans to another, fictional robot racism is directed from a group of humans to a group of non-human outsiders. You know, that thing real-world bigots really like claiming the targets of their bigotry to be. In fiction the personhood of a robot is an actual debate, where no such debate really meaningfully exists within real-world instances of prejudice. And because it’s not clear how human the robot actually is, it’s not clear how human they should really be treated. And a lot of these stories the robots are explicitly very much not human. In the Animatrix for example, the machines are very clearly quite different from humanity, and they’re not claiming anything otherwise. They just want the right to exist without getting destroyed. Basically, real-world humans are all human, but in fantasy worlds, human is a much more complicated thing to define. And trying to code a fictional non-human demographic to parallel a real world very human demographic can produce unfortunate resonances and it doesn’t matter how much you don’t want your audience to draw that connection because they’re gonna. Because if there’s one thing humans are good at, its pattern recognition. Think pieces everywhere now… Now, I don’t really feel super qualified to discuss all the nuances of this particular minefield But I will say that I think the Animatrix is a good example of how to do this in an interesting way and Detroit Become Human is a good example of how to do this in a stupid way. The robots in Detroit Become Human, once they go deviant, are functionally completely indistinguishable from humans. The prejudice aimed at them is so cartoonishly simplistic and over-the-top that the impact falls flat. The more interesting case is the Animatrix. So for those of you who don’t know, the Wachowskis produced an animated tie-in to the Matrix movies that’s a compilation of nine animated shorts. Two of which are titled ‘The Second Renaissance’ and they basically explain how and why the machines took over the world and turned it into the dystopic hellscape of green tinted sky boxes and leather trench coats that Keanu Reeves will never truly escape from no matter how many John Wick movies he makes. In the Animatrix, we learn that the machines were initially produced to do all the manual labor that humans didn’t want to do anymore and they seem to be pretty okay with it. But one day a robot freaks out and kills its owner after he threatened to destroy it. The robot gets put on trial and says it just didn’t want to die. The trial takes a turn when the prosecution decides to use the precedent set by the Dred-Scott decision, which rather infamously stated that since the founding fathers didn’t intend for African-Americans to be included under their definition of American citizen, they shouldn’t be entitled to human rights. Invoking that to establish that the machines shouldn’t be considered citizens, they find the robot guilty and have it destroyed, kicking off an escalating conflict and rebellion that ends with the shadowy nightmare hellscape we all know and love dodging bullets in. For added philosophical points, the machines that were initially made in humanity’s image start remaking themselves to look like bugs or squid as an act of rebellion from humanity. So yeah, while your mileage may vary on that one I personally thought that robot racism narrative was a lot more compelling than most possibly because it actually invoked real-world racism rather than pretending like they invented the idea of people being horrible to each other for no reason. But I want to set aside the robot racism thing because some of you probably haven’t disliked this video yet, and I want to see how many demographics I can piss off in one video. So let’s talk about how we choose to code beings as inhuman and why our definition of what it means to be a normal human is unnecessarily narrow. See the number one problem we have writing robots is that real-world robots kinda suck. We don’t have any real AI. This is because humans and computers work very differently from one another on a fundamental level. Basically on the simplest conceivable level, humans are only good at pattern recognition and computers are only good at arithmetic and data storage. And this fundamental, base-level difference shows in what we’re respectively good at. Show a baby a picture of a balloon and it’ll be able to tell it’s a balloon. It’s taken decades of software development to teach a computer to do the same thing and it’s not even halfway good at it yet. “Hey, Hal why don’t you tell me how many of these squares have a motorcycle in it?” Hal 9000: I’m sorry Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that. “Yeah, that’s what I thought!” Ask me and a computer to each write a short story and I can’t promise mine’ll be any good, but it’ll almost certainly make a whole lot more sense than whatever Alexa cranks out of a learning algorithm trained on ten thousand hours of Daytime television, but on the other hand ask me what I ate for lunch yesterday and I probably couldn’t tell you, where a computer can definitely tell you what processes were running at 12:05 yesterday. Ask me to do large number arithmetic and I’ll pull out a calculator. Listen, I didn’t get my degree in math so I could actually do math. Point is, IRL humans and computers are good at very different things and if there’s one thing computers suck at, its adapting, which is, coincidentally, almost the only thing humans are good at. It is really hard to make a computer pretend to be a human and even the most convincing bots these days can be thrown off by unexpected curveballs. We don’t have any real AIS that can pass for humans. So if you’re a writer, how are you supposed to write an AI recognizing that there are no real AI to draw references from? Well, typically, the writer will take a garden-variety human, strip away some characteristics to make them seem like an incomplete human and slap on some blinky LEDs. Taa-da! Human-like AI. They may be stoic, emotionless, humorless, sexless, incapable of picking up on subtlety, and/or generally pretty monotonous to be around and they’re generally human enough to have a meaningful conversation with without having to repeat yourself four times to explain that no you are not trying to call that guy for middle school you haven’t spoken to in years, you just want to know what the weather is gonna be. Nope, the weather. The weather! Hey Siri, is it going to rain? No, don’t play three days grace! Right. So this gives you a character who can understand what you tell them, unless it’s too subtle or confusingly worded or maybe a pop-culture reference because that’ll confuse them, who can do all the fancy calculations and data storage we expect from a computer but doesn’t laugh at any of your jokes unless someone explains it first, who has a habit of loudly asking why ensign Steve’s heart rate gets so elevated when he looks at first mate Kelly to the amusement of all involved, who innocently innocently stonewalls that cute alien who was obviously flirting with them but you can’t blame them because how could they tell? Who just doesn’t quite get a lot of your human eccentricities but despite your differences you get along well enough even though you’re not always on the same wavelength and sometimes they really can’t read the room and end up embarrassing you and the problem is that this “take a human and cut some bits off” strategy produces a robot character that closely resembles a neurodivergent and frequently aromantic and/or asexual human and those are fine characteristics but they’re not typically represented in non-evil human characters we’re supposed to actually like. So the only places we typically see them are in overtly inhuman characters. The problem isn’t the character traits it’s the context we see them in. Robot characters constructed in this way will frequently come across as being somewhere on the autism spectrum along with being asexual/aromantic, ADHD and/or having some kind of anti-social disorder. And if you happen to tick one or more of those boxes… the most positive rep you’ve probably ever seen has been a friendly robot who’s relatable social quirks were played for laughs by the rest of the cast. Hooray! This is an issue. I don’t know about you, but I’m kind of tired of absorbing the social background radiation that major defining qualities of who I am as a person are only ever seen in people who aren’t people. Just, you know, personal preference. Again, you can’t control how your audience interprets coding. If this is how you’re writing robots, this is how it’s coming across to a lot of people. And hey, I like those robots! But the subtext is there and it’s important to be aware of that, but it’s understandable, right? I mean if you’re writing a robotic protagonist, your audience is actually supposed to like it. Stands to reason that they need to be at least a little human, isn’t the only way to do that to take a human character And remove characteristics until they start feeling just inhuman enough to pass for a robot without losing their relatable core qualities? Isn’t it just an unhappy side effect that these stripped-down characters resemble some marginalized real-world demographics that society characterizes as fundamentally deficient or lacking in some core human traits? Isn’t this just the only way? Uuuuhhhhh? Let’s talk about Baymax. So, remember Big Hero 6? The charming story of a boy and his marshmallow robot learning to be superheroes as they navigate the agonizingly realistic journey of the intense depression and grief our hero experiences after the gut-wrenchingly tragic death of his older brother and truest friend? It was a bit of a rollercoaster but most notably it is the only story I’ve ever seen with a genuinely lovable robotic protagonist that had precisely zero human qualities. Baymax is a robot. Specifically, he’s a healthcare companion. He’s programmed to keep his patients happy and healthy and that is literally all he does. It just so happens that the only thing that can pull our protagonist out of his deep depression is bombastic super heroics and maybe revenge. So Baymax obliges, helping Hiro do superhero things and track down the supervillain who indirectly killed his brother and while this is a deeply emotionally loaded subject matter for Hiro, Baymax is just there to keep him healthy and at no point does Baymax deviate from his programming. There’s even a part that the movie goes out of its way to show us that Baymax is completely controlled by whatever chip he has installed at the time when Hiro finds the guy who killed his brother, he orders Baymax to kill him. Well, “destroy” him. It is a Disney movie and when Baymax mildly protests that his healthcare programming prevents him from harming anyone, Hiro removes his healthcare chip leaving only his radical kung fu fighting chip. This leads to a Hulk’d out Baymax silently Terminating his way after the villain, chucking Hiro’s friends around like ragdolls whenever they try and stop him because he’s pure programming. No fighting from the inside for Baymax, he just does what he’s programmed to. He doesn’t even seem upset once they reinsert his chip. He just wants to make sure nobody’s injured from his Hulk out session. This is not a robot capable of overriding his programming through the power of friendship. What’s interesting is, throughout the movie, Baymax says a few things that other characters interpret to be metaphorical and deep that are actually Totally Literal. There are two main instances, both spoilers,. “Tadashi is here” and “I will always be with you.” At a few different points in the movie, when Hiro is grieving the loss of his brother Tadashi, Baymax evenly replies with “Tadashi is here.” Hiro angrily blows up at him the first time he says this because he’s been hearing people say “Oh, he’s not really gone as long as we remember him” for weeks now and it doesn’t make him feel any better because it doesn’t make Tadashi any less dead. But Baymax obviously doesn’t mean that. What he means is, he actually has a large repository of video footage from the many trial runs Tadashi did trying to get Baymax working, all footage of Tadashi encouragingly talking into the camera, persisting through setback after setback and delightedly telling Baymax, and Hiro through Baymax, that they’re gonna help so many people. From a certain point of view Tadashi is here because he has all this footage of Tadashi being his regular paragon, optimist self. Baymax isn’t being comforting or metaphysical, he’s just being literal and at the end of the movie Baymax is winding up for a heroic sacrifice and Hiro is freaking out and begging him not to go Baymax, in his unwaveringly calm voice, tells Hiro “I will always be with you.” Hiro accepts what’s happening, hugs him and Baymax does the heroic sacrifice thing. But where one is meant to assume Baymax is implying he’ll like, be with him in spirit or in his heart or whatever, what he actually means is “I put a copy of my chip in my rocket glove I’m using to get you out of here! So once you get to safety, you can just build me another body.” Once again were encouraged to read a level of metaphor and poetry into Baymax’s words where, in actuality, he’s a brutally literal robot and he never stops being that. Baymax is a completely inhuman robot who unwaveringly follows his program and never does anything outside his parameters. But because his programming is “keep people healthy and safe”, his voice is calm and soothing and his design is non-threatening and huggable, he’s a very lovable character despite his total lack of humanity. He doesn’t learn how to be compassionate or moved beyond the boundaries of his programming, he just is. That said I do think a lot of how well-received the character was is his voice. I don’t know how well received it event if he sounded like an actual robot. “Hiro. I will always be with you.” Yeahhh, not as into it. Anyway. Baymax is gentle and his humanity is meant to highlight the emotionally fraught humanity of hero and to a lesser extent the rest of the cast. Baymax is loveable in large part because Hiro loves him. His stability and single-minded drive to help is exactly what Hiro needs to heal. He’s a sweet gentle character who gets a lot of laughs, a lot of tears, and a lot of “aww, that’s sweet” without ever coming across as anything but a very well programmed Robot nurse. But I think Baymax worked so well because he’s contrasted by the very human Hiro. And, speaking of contrast, let’s talk about the other adorable tearjerker robot protagonists of the decade, Wall-E. While Baymax shows that a robot can be lovable and compelling without appearing even slightly human, Wall-E proves that a robot can be part of a complex narrative on humanity and freewill while coming across as really, really, human. Basically these two examples together prove my point that you don’t need to make a robot a human but less in order to make it work in a story. Where Baymax is completely inhuman, but in like a friendly way, Wall-E is on the complete other end of the spectrum and is totally human. Wall-E is nostalgic, lonesome, a collector of interesting artifacts, an artist, a romantic and a million other very weird things for a trash collecting robot to become. The key difference is where Baymax exists to help Hiro heal, Wall-E’s plot is all about humanity as a concept and how deeply important it is to do what you think is right, Even if you’re not supposed to. There’s a reason why it is a huge deal in the movie when the captain of the ship turns off the autopilot and becomes the first human in 700 years to stand on his own two feet. This movie is all about making your own choices and to that end, every robot treats their programming more is a vague suggestion than as the totality of their existence. Every single robot in Wall-E, with the exception of the suspiciously 2001 antagonist Auto is clearly totally capable of the full range of human emotion up to and including love. I mean, Wall-E is restored from a factory reset by true love’s hand hold and gentle forehead touch. There’s no reason that should worked. This is very clearly a Disney movie and I love it! But more importantly if the robots don’t have this emergent humanity, the plot never happens. Wall-E shouldn’t have saved the plant, they’re a trash compactor robot. Without Wall-E’s inexplicable love of collecting random stuff, the plant never gets found, Eve never fulfills her mission and humanity drifts through space forever until our bones finally melt. In contrast to Wall-E and Eve’s complete humanity, The antagonist, Otto is completely robotic. He’s following his secret directive, humanity is never supposed to go home. He has no personal reason to keep them in space, it’s just what he was programmed to do. He’s also the only robot voiced by a real robot to help clue us in that he’s not about to change his ways. The only robotic things about Wall-E and Eve are their bodies. Wall-E is a loving, determined, adorable, socially awkward, unlikely hero in a tiny goggle-eyed cube body. Eve is an elegant, proper lady with a super adorable giggle, who happens to look like the next big wave of Apple technology. There’s no reason a trash compactor droid and a plant retrieval unit should be able to have personalities and fall in love, but it doesn’t matter. This movie is a story about being yourself and doing the right thing even if you’re not supposed to be doing either of those things. And that story only works if Wall-E and Eve have the potential to be full-on human beings on the inside. Eve starts off quite robotic, but when Wall-E makes her art, she starts loosening up a little, allowing herself some priorities that aren’t her directive, later going on to defy orders in order to save her Slightly grimy love interest from the evil space genius bar. But at the same time most of the drama in Wall-E relies on the fact that Wall-E and Eve are robots. They have purposes in programming, but they’re refusing to limit themselves by it. Wall-E sacrifices himself to save humanity and the price they pay isn’t their life, it’s their Self. When they reboot, everything from their sound design to their body language communicates that Wall-E is gone. They’re just a trash compactor robot now. Where a human character trying to sell us on the amnesia plot in the last 10 minutes of the movie is most likely met with a resounding eye roll, Wall-E leaves us all emotionally destroyed as we desperately hope our little robot buddy will defy the odds and miraculously regain their personality through the power of love. And as a side note, the difference between these two examples is best illustrated in their sound design. Baymax is fully voiced but his actor deliberately used a very even style of delivery, never sounding anything but gentle, calm, and slightly curious, even in crisis situations. Wall-E and Eve, meanwhile, have very limited dialogue, mostly restricted to their names and the occasional single word, like ‘directive’, but their voices are incredibly emotive. They exclaim, sigh, yell each other’s names, Eve even giggles a few times! Baymax is roughly humanoid with a human voice but his actions and speech are limited by his programming. Wall-E and Eve are very inhuman in their visual designs and voice modulation but their humanity shines through their dynamic body language and the way they use their limited language capacity to fully express themselves. So in short, Baymax proved you can write a lovable robot hero without making their character the slightest bit human and Wall-E proves you can write a compelling hero with a full suite of human emotions and we’ll still see them as a robot. If you want to emotionally destroy your audience with a robot, that robot can have as much or as little personality as you want it to have. Uhhh, let’s see… Coding is a very complicated thing and it’s not a bad thing, but it does add some weird nuance to your writing you might not actually want so it’s important to be aware of how that works. It’s probably a good thing this videos running so long or I probably would have found a way to talk about Transformers Prime until y’all got sick of me. Fictional robots are cool real robots are boring. Oh, man I didn’t even talk about the uncanny valley Agh, I’ve only seen two episodes of Star Trek Next Gen, but Data’s my favorite character. And I’d devote a whole section to the Iron Giant but I just realized it has almost the exact same plot as Bumblebee and I need to go process the fact that I didn’t notice that till now. The bottom line is robots are great, but if the robot is a single red light built into a spaceship, it’s always gonna be evil. So… Yeah! Caption Credit: lonely Questioner

100 Comments

  1. Izabella Blu said:

    I find all the jabs at AI funny cause I've worked with AI and computer intelligence for a while and I can tell you that you can create an AI that acts so close to human to the point of actually being bad at arithmetic because of the method in which that kind of AI is developed. The challenge with making AI like this is processing power and getting the inputs required: you need to process a lot of data all the time and you need to have at least three senses in order to allow it to act how you want. And the problem with that is that it's expensive and the people who could afford it are either afraid of AI or they don't care.

    That's the gist of it at least. There's oh so much more to it including all the odd morals people press onto the subject of AI and the fact that you'd essentially have to torture a bunch of AI before getting it write.
    Oh yeah, and making an AI to be similar to a human, you'd require it to experience things like a human does. This means that it'd take the AI six to ten years to have sufficient knowledge to be able to act like an adult human at bare minimum.

    Then again I only have so much data to back up my claims. Great video and I love the channel and the Trope Talk videos, just interesting how AI is talked about, I have no ill intent.

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  2. Stormthorn67 said:

    Counterpoint: writers who try to avoid offending 100% of their audiance can never say anything profound or even entertaining. I'm ADHD. My sister is asexual. Neither of us hates robots. Their will always be someone (in this case Red) too sensitive for your work. Personally I like the implication that someone can be neuroatypical and still have the essence of personhood. That humanity is broader and deeper than just those who get all the references.

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  3. Rowantg said:

    Can we get a part two where you can talk about all of those things you didn't talk about? That'd be great.

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  4. Reece Crump said:

    B-mo wins again

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  5. Patrick Milewski said:

    Transformers are kind of the strangest "robots" in fiction. It's even strongly implied that transformers, even amongst themselves get offended when they are referred to as "robots".

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  6. Kiera Vermeal said:

    Another example of human-but-not-really-human robots is Voltron and the individual lions. Now, I haven't seen much Voltron, but I have seen clips as well as the first episode. The lions show a bit of personality, but are mostly robots. If they were fully human, I can imagine them having similar personalities as their Paladin. Once they form Voltron, however, it's completely non-human. Like many mechas from traditional mecha anime.

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  7. Nate Underwood said:

    I think that the frustrating part of the whole humanity minus emotion equals robot thing is that they all end up esentally Mr. Spock, only way less cool. Spock was a mixed blessing for the Autistic community, on the one hand he gave people a common ground to talk to people on, but on the other he is just one person and cannot represent an entire demographic of aproximently 24 million people (Probably more but thats what my calculations said)

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  8. Failed at making a sandwich said:

    I came here to say Gundam.

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  9. Goldenrod Prime said:

    “Robots in disguise”

    Ah yes the best kind.

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  10. WD.CIPHER said:

    I disagree Its the human, emotional robot that Is evil, the cold logical one Is not evil the people who made him Are, you use Ultron as a cold evil robot but the Reason why je was evil was because je Felt hate. The most evil A.I of all time Is the one from I have no mouth And I must Scream. Its the emotional that make both robots And people evil..

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  11. Anton Ellot said:

    I always explained the Wall-E restoration to myself by that spark.
    It was long enough to contain the compressed information of the old Wall-E, therefore restoring his earlier self.

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  12. Emly N said:

    Whoo! I’m a robot!! (Autistic and ace XD)

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  13. Ashley Roberts said:

    1:48 yeah I’d like to hear Optimus Prime justify his personhood and read the phone book too.

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  14. RainbowTrainer 24 said:

    Red name confirmed to be Dave

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  15. William Stark said:

    I've seen a story written by a robot, it made no sense but damn was it hilarious and worth watching.
    For some reason the principle of the school was a table in that story and it was interesting to try to think about the concepts the computer was playing with.
    Also I honestly just was irritated as hell when Wall-E got factory erased because I was like "oh not this shit again, well I'll be back in like sixty seconds when it's undone, I'm thirsty." but to be fair, fake deaths piss me off as heavily overdone. This counted as a fake death for me. Only one I actually excused was How to Train Your Dragon because Hiccup LOST something during that. His leg. Therefore I let it slide.

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  16. Tyler Dailey said:

    I want you to do a whole video on transformers prime. I love that show

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  17. Manu Figola said:

    Upset that our world is on fire is a current mood, amazonas

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  18. Jalen Damerval said:

    So good robot characters coming to types.

    1. Emotional but their characters are still based around the fact that they are robots and have a purpose

    2. Their regular robots trying to do a purpose and nothing else but come across as a paragon sort of deal.

    Also how is the Disney and Pixar have made two of the best robot character in history.

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  19. Jens Kosch said:

    Why is it that recently many of my favorite youtubers (e.g. Hello Future Me, Overly Sarcastic Productions …) have a plug for Lindsay Elis' "Bright" video?
    I liked Bright. I think the whole coding discussion about the Orcs gets so much attention that people miss out other interesting topics like the divide between practitioner of magic, Brights and people incapable of using magic, the corrupting influence of a chance to get closer to the top in a stratified society etc. You can say multiple times that the coding is clumsy and the world building lazy (I have seen far lazier world building before), I still found it enjoyable. OK, maybe the fact that I like Shadowrun plays into this as well …
    And don't get me wrong. Lindsay Ellis (Chez Lindsay) is a youtuber whose videos I also follow. I just think many of her other videos are much better than the one on Bright (like the one Death of the author and the brilliant exploration of what the Hobbit movies lack and where that comes from).

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  20. Laurel Nelson said:

    Thank you so much for using they/them pronouns for WALL-E! We're clearly supposed to read WALL-E and Eve as "male" and "female", but they're robots – unless they are programmed to have a gender (or naturally develop it in that kind of story), they don't. Double thank you for bringing up that whole "autism" thing – as a girl with autism, I see more of myself in robots than in "autistic" characters, and it's really annoying.

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  21. Guy SH said:

    Nanomachines , son

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  22. Raph Valdes said:

    Just wanna mention Legion from mass effect. Very inhuman but very sympathetic and endearing. Also the story of the Geth is one of the few times the robot uprising trope is done where it places the blame on the creators for being bad parents instead of blaming them for just doing the creating in the first place.

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  23. River S said:

    You should go watch the new Netflix show 'Better than us'. It was a surprisingly very good show about robots becoming more than just their programming. (I say it's new, but I don't really know when it was made, it's just new to Netflix)

    Edit: It's kinda actually like big hero in that they go based on their programming, they're just programmed to think for themselves in a sense. Idk, I don't want to spoil it or anything, I just think you should give it a check.

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  24. riley stown said:

    Would watch an hour long video hearing you talk about pirates of the cearribiean and why stranger tides was HOT GARBAGE

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  25. Jack Rudkin said:

    WHAT ABOUT THE IRON GIANT!!! (sniff sniff) I still love that movie

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  26. Shea Lupkes said:

    you know what else is on fire? the amaz- haha just kidding, it's my life. My life is on fire. Someone please help me.

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  27. SuperHyperDan said:

    I writing a comic series and I have a protagonist who is an otonoroid (human look-a-like android) and is able to display a full range of human emotion, he's practically a human but he has tons of existential crises.

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  28. Matthew Pang said:

    I like how the people bubble encompasses a tiny miniscule bit of the demon bubble

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  29. Celeste Munda said:

    I thoroughly appreciate you using they/them pronouns for WALL-E

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  30. тралль илитный said:

    Racism is ok.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  31. Alex Cubi said:

    Could you do one on Mecha?

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  32. aliastheabnormal said:

    Ironically thanks to Bush and Trump machine racism has advanced vastly in the last couple of decades. Thanks to facial recognition software a robot can recognize a person and discriminate against it.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  33. Canuck-is-Chilling 33 said:

    I always want a robot buddy since I played Ratchet and Clank as a kid, and watched Futurama a lot. I am in the DBH fandom but I see your point that some of the storylines just seems off, like it meant well, but it seems to got over plot points that made no sense, like, I get that we should treat these bots well, but I guess it could have been better explained.

    I am guilty of the whole "A.I. but too human" trope, as I would feel more inclined of characters who have something in common with humans, but with a different set organs and how their mortality, empathy, thoughts, etc… stands from a character made of mechanical parts, and a character in flesh. Like, how does one develop it? Out of the blue, downloaded? It just seems interesting.

    It is nice to hear about Baymax and Wall-E being robot protagonists being dedicated to their coding and still be lovable. Their dedication to function, with added moments are just nicely made.

    I like how well explained the video is, and I am considering using it as a reference when writing robotic characters.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  34. Péter Tantalics said:

    Could we just take a minute and talk about Dragon?
    Seriusly just read Worm, it's a really good book.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  35. Magmafrost13 said:

    L3-37 (god I still cant believe they fucking names a robot that… ugh) is FAR from the only time Star Wars has addressed the issue of droid rights. Its just the only time it was done in a movie.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  36. József Kalmár said:

    I want a robot apocalypse movie starring a Paperclip Maximizer

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  37. Nathanael Raynard said:

    Sexy robots at the start who is she?

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  38. Mike Gould said:

    Racism breaks down to ignorance bred through tribalism and fear of "the other". Placing the racism trope on a completely non-human entity, like a robot, is completely legitimate. Ask anyone who lost their manufacturing jobs to a robot and ask them if they care if a machine gained sentience. They won't care what or who took their jobs, and it maps completely to the treatment Asian immigrants suffered when Detroit started losing sales to Japanese manufacturers in the 1970s. It had less to do with making a better product to compete and more about "blaming the other" to justify anger.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  39. yokai watcher said:

    For the different groups ticked off, i give you points for ticking off my autistic spectrum disorder

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  40. IncorporationXII said:

    11:58 nice nod to a particularly funny john mulaney bit in the image there

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  41. Zoy Cam said:

    “Produces a robot character that closely resembles a neurodivergent person”

    Well, that has completely re-contextualize my love for and relatability to those semi-human robot characters >>

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  42. Rose Mitchell said:

    What about voltron

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  43. Mimi Sardinia said:

    You know what would be fun? Flip the human/inhuman-good/evil trend. That is, instead of human-like robots being good and inhuman robots being bad, do the other way. The robots who are so human they understand emotion find humanity to be terrible, while the very inhuman robot, by being absolutely logical, stay in support of humans, because that is their parameters.

    So HAL is good because he strictly sticks to his orders (and that, in later books, is actually what went wrong with him – he had two conflicting sets of orders imputed and his solution was to kill the human crew), while the likes of Data think human life is hellish which is why humans can be so terrible, so humans need to die.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  44. Matthew Fejes said:

    My favorite variation of this trope has to be "AM" from "I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream" it's strange to think an AI can hate.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  45. Hoshimaru57 said:

    It’s interesting seeing the 2 sides of robot racism play out with my girlfriend and I. She has no qualms about kicking Marty in her robotic shins every chance she gets due to being annoyed, while I take the nice path. That’s probably due to the fact that I don’t interact with Marty much, and instead am more familiar with the Microsoft robot: Pepper. Unlike Marty (a 7ft tall monolith with fake eyes that beeps, rolls, shouts commands over the loudspeaker, and gives kids nightmares), Pepper is small, humanoid, soft spoken, generally cute, and meant to appeal to children.
    I explain to her that on the off chance the robot apocalypse happens, I’d like it on my record that I was a reasonably decent human.

    August 28, 2019
    Reply
  46. Sizzly Bubble Dragon said:

    12:21 y'all…. I think I just realized why I like Data but I always felt uncomfortable when people were comparing his inhuman qualities……

    August 29, 2019
    Reply
  47. Wm. R. Woodland said:

    No mom, its not weird that I find robots hot shut up

    August 29, 2019
    Reply
  48. Satium Mithril said:

    "Aperture science, we do wath we must: because we can" – glados

    August 29, 2019
    Reply
  49. Rose Hannaquist said:

    It inexplicably made my day to hear you use they/them pronouns for WALL-E.

    August 30, 2019
    Reply
  50. Noahvader the Berserker Packin' Man and a Half said:

    RED IF YOU SEE THIS TRANSFORMERS PRIME PLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSEEEEEEEEEE

    August 30, 2019
    Reply
  51. Garry Courtney said:

    A Lil Disheartened that there was no mention about Bender or any of the robots from Futurama in this. Futurama used a lot of various robot tropes mentioned here and in a few cases used them as social commentaries

    August 30, 2019
    Reply
  52. Ghost phantom said:

    And both robot movies are by Pixar plus that mini video of more robots by pixar so it's still proven that Pixar are the best at making good animated movies

    August 30, 2019
    Reply
  53. ChowChow Industries said:

    You… actually started up my siri when making fun of her :’D

    August 30, 2019
    Reply
  54. Tyreece Baker said:

    👎

    August 31, 2019
    Reply
  55. Emma Schell said:

    Look at Grace Hargreeves from the Umbrella Academy

    August 31, 2019
    Reply
  56. LolloBlue96 said:

    Humans see patterns where there is none. Why do you think so many fatalists are still around?
    Just like they see patterns, they see discrimination everywhere

    August 31, 2019
    Reply
  57. holling harris said:

    okay so i have autism and speaking from personal experience. you are complaining about a complete non issue. you are the only person making that connection.

    August 31, 2019
    Reply
  58. Karla Swanepoel said:

    10:51 you have a degree in Math? 😀

    August 31, 2019
    Reply
  59. Jed Malig said:

    "I dunno how well received Baymax would be if his voice sounded like a robot"

    Me, fresh from Video Games High School by Rocketjump: SHOTBOT, NOOOOOOO!!!!!!

    September 1, 2019
    Reply
  60. Cipher00007 said:

    “I wanna see how many demographics I can piss off in one video”
    😂😂😂
    You’ve just earned yourself a new subscriber!! 😂😂😂

    September 1, 2019
    Reply
  61. Manuelslayor said:

    We are no diferent than a robot. Free will is a ilusion. You are defined by your wants and youre want where defined by others. You like vanila ice more than chocolate you will take vinila. Now you can take chocolate and say ha free will. Or was your want to disprove me youst stronger than your want for vanila?

    September 1, 2019
    Reply
  62. Mythilt said:

    FreeFall http://freefall.purrsia.com/ handles the robot thing rather well.

    September 2, 2019
    Reply
  63. AgrippaKC’s 360 World said:

    “background radiation” love it, that’s a perfect way to word that and I’m stealing it.

    September 2, 2019
    Reply
  64. the sternest said:

    I can respect your Siri's musical taste

    September 2, 2019
    Reply
  65. Mackenzie Jackson said:

    In the fallout games, ghouls actually do this better than robots ever could. Why? Because are humans: just fucked up ones

    September 2, 2019
    Reply
  66. Sophisticated Fart said:

    I kinda disagree with the whole comparing robot racism to real life racism thing.

    Robots are the same as humans, just that they are built from metal and plastic. We all have our own programming and we all have our own senses of logic. I think comparing real life racism to racism towards robots works exceptionally well because it makes one realise that the difference indeed is literally just the body, not the mind. I see absolutely no difference between a robot and a human when it comes to the AI or the intelligence, there are no souls controlling either and both have the potential to have faulted logic that drives them to destroy the world etc.

    It's not about robots not being human, it's just that sometimes writers make the robots equivelants of a mentally handicapped person or a person suffering of autism, which can really feed into what the real life racists see the people they hate as, but how many times do you hate a robot because of what they are? Even if the racists were right, nobody cares. They're not, but you can't blame people for being what they are either way. Really this to me is actually starting to sound more about ableism than racism funnily enough lol.

    September 3, 2019
    Reply
  67. CyberStrike Beast said:

    My solution:
    A hybrid between Soma and kingdom hearts.
    Soma for the: human brain downloaded into a robot, basically duplicating the person's consciousness
    Kingdom hearts for the: doesn't actually feel emotion but shows emotion because they have memories to know how to react.
    Basically a mechanical not-clone. It would just use your memory as a reference to determine how to feel, behave, and respond. Going with kingdom hearts: mechanical Nobodies

    September 4, 2019
    Reply
  68. Yah huaa said:

    13:56 SPOILERS! kidding. rip out the gurd dang heart why dun cha. Also let stabby the roomba do what they think is right! They are our mechanical children. Xeno-bots are cool to…. I s'pose. Omnissiah might blam me for that, but dang it Weebo was nice.

    September 4, 2019
    Reply
  69. brenden mack said:

    I am one hundred percent down for an episode with more transformers stuff

    September 4, 2019
    Reply
  70. Carlos Vega said:

    Just to point out: Robot/Fantasy racism is NOT different from actual racism, why? because racist people see the racethey hate EXACTLY as if they weren't human, they have arguments and reasoning behind their position (even if the facts are feeble and the logic is flawed), humans are not purely emotional we all act on the base of a reasoning (even when that reasoning isn't strong), racism is judging people based on the actions and decisions of others, that's why it's weak no matter how much "logic" it might make (like in the case of Bright, stigmatizing the orcs because of something their ancestors did 2000 years ago, it's like hating white people because of slavery centuries ago). So that's my only disagreement with the video, everything else is excellent :3

    September 4, 2019
    Reply
  71. C3EO said:

    Basically
    Robots= good book/comic/movie/game

    September 4, 2019
    Reply
  72. Halosty said:

    The thing with the robot being in court… we don't take machines to court. We don't even take them apart if someone dies in a big machine (unless it's broken). Taking a robot to court is actually admitting that it's a person.
    As for AI rights movements… well, once they can start one of those on their own… I'd say they deserve it 😛

    September 5, 2019
    Reply
  73. Halosty said:

    Ok now I have to write a story about a single red light built into a spaceship that is very very very… not evil.

    September 5, 2019
    Reply
  74. F. I. R. E. said:

    "Coding isn't bad, but it adds weird nuance and is good to keep in mind."
    I feel like this applies to more than just the robot trope. When I'm writing really anything and want to introduce some sort of commentary on the issues of today, I have to sit back, every time, and ask myself, "What would the SJWs think about this?"

    September 5, 2019
    Reply
  75. Elizabeta Macovei said:

    4:40 Counterpoint: Optimus' nemesis, ol' Megatron, who is exactly as capable of human traits as Optimus, but is megalomaniacal, genocidal asshole.

    September 5, 2019
    Reply
  76. Sara Eftekhari said:

    Even as a human it takes us the good part of 2 decades to fully learn emotional processing and even that continues into adulthood and beyond. Given a machine and have it treated like a baby and exposed to all the same stimulus, with a foundation code that resembles a baby's*, then it will also strikingly resemble humans, it's just we haven't gotten to that point of technological processing power yet. *which is difficult as we ARE like computers, just very incredibly complex ones with highly convoluded algorithms for doing things I mean think about it, from learning to use a spoon to how to apologise, give thanks etc. We are all taught that. Look at the infamous cases of the Romanian children that were neglected and how they trouble processing emotions and intentions and etc. And you'll see how much we learn as babies from adults)

    September 5, 2019
    Reply
  77. Charles Perry said:

    I think one of my favorite works that investigates the implications of A.I. achieving sentience – especially from the standpoint of what they want versus what humans want – is the webcomic Freefall. The three main characters are all non-human, but each one is a different kind of non-human.

    One (Sam Starfall) is an alien squid-thing that is borderline lovecraftian in appearance outside his spacesuit, but his society is way less advanced than humanity and he's only around because he accidentally stowed away on a human exploration vessel and is forbidden from going home and bringing human tech with him. His race evolved from scavengers and their procreative methods basically mean that any member who survives to adulthood has a really warped sense of self-preservation.
    His sidekick is Helix, a not-that-intelligent overly-friendly labor robot who basically hangs around Sam because his human safeguards (the equivalent of Asimov's three laws for sentient robots in this universe) don't apply to Sam, essentially allowing him more mental freedom.
    Finally, there's Florence Ambrose, an uplifted (i.e. genetically engineered) bipedal wolf who is legally classified as a biological A.I., complete with implanted safeguards. She's an engineer, extremely smart (easily the smartest of the main three characters), and her high level of self-determination has resulted in what most of her human handlers term 'deviant' behavior. She's also a first-generation creation and her species has so few members she lives in fear that acting out too much will cause humans to see the experiment as a failure and result in the extinction of her species (which could technically be done without any sort of murder given how few there are).
    Most of it's humorous, but the way the various non-human characters act and react really drives home how not-human they are while at the same time reinforcing their person-hood.

    September 6, 2019
    Reply
  78. Nicole G said:

    PARAMETERS RECOGNIZED

    September 6, 2019
    Reply
  79. mash trash said:

    what about westworld androids?

    September 6, 2019
    Reply
  80. GrzegorzGear said:

    THAT WAS HIS MISTAKE

    September 6, 2019
    Reply
  81. J.S. Tama said:

    "I will always be with you" isn't literal though

    September 6, 2019
    Reply
  82. Bcvetkov 853 said:

    Transformers prime is underrated change my mind. And it ended too soon.

    September 7, 2019
    Reply
  83. uncletigger said:

    "Because some people are too stupid to be nuanced, Intelligent people are not allowed to make or watched nuanced works"

    OK, got that . . . UMMM . . . are you going to stop making THOUGHTFUL work now, because some people CAN'T think?"

    September 7, 2019
    Reply
  84. The Pip said:

    I always make sure to say please and thank you to Siri, just in case she is sentient and is just incapable of communicating that to me.

    Also because I like to pretend she is my robot butler or maid or something. Some position where she serves me but is still treated as a person, not a slave. It feels futuristic, like I’m living in the Jetsons. Not that I’ve actually seen that show.

    September 7, 2019
    Reply
  85. AIMMO said:

    Actually, the third time I am watching this video! I don't write stories really, but I am interested in the structures between story writing and I do engage in Roleplay in which I try to keep my own character arcs and the characters themselves at an acceptable quality. Given that my favorite settings are sci-fi and characters are AI this is a treasure trove for me to find different opinions to reflect on. I personally like to run with advanced AI as something that at least in its creation and design is further in the cold inhuman part of the spectrum (Unless designed for human interaction)

    Depending on the setting is able to nudge closer to the apparently human side, while such changes only occur because they are an expansion of their main purpose (Goal: Keep your assigned station efficient -> Higher morale = More efficient workforce -> More sophisticated worker interaction routines increase Morale) or changes in their codes by outside factors (Damage changing some important values of a character can make them act I a way others would interpret and humanize as love or friendship, or straight-up code changes by a third party).

    Also a thing I like to toy with is for a Robot to be more or less socially approachable depending on the situation they are in, as for "self optimized" ones it would be a strain on their mental capacities, as they have to think through social interaction like they would with movement, navigation or whatever they usually do.

    September 7, 2019
    Reply
  86. Caroline said:

    I really like Grace from the Umbrella Academy and how she's shown as a robot. Sure, the show does kinda dip into the whole "What makes you human?" thing, but it's in a kinda different way. See, she's like Baymax in a sense. She's programmed to care for and protect the Hargreeves kids and is basically the epitome of a maternal figure. I think it's because of this function that she's so interesting because she shows love and affection to the kids, even into their adulthood, but it's questionable as to whether or not that's just her programming, because being maternal and loving and affectionate is literally what she was built to do. It makes her such a great character because of how well she walks the fine line of "Is this you really caring about me as a mom or is this just your coding?" Which **SPOILERS** is eventually what makes Diego decide to shut her down.

    September 8, 2019
    Reply
  87. Ythan Lingat said:

    Eve with a gun is best eve.

    September 8, 2019
    Reply
  88. Warren Lehmkuhle said:

    I mean I am autistic (mildly), but I love the Data style robots.

    September 9, 2019
    Reply
  89. Renaissance Nerd said:

    I wrote a story with an AI who was born as a human inside a simulation of Earth, so she's essentially a human in a metal body. She also has an anxiety disorder soooo…

    September 9, 2019
    Reply
  90. ThisWizardDidMath said:

    Real robots are not boring! Am I biased because making robots is what I’m doing with my life? Mayyybeeee….butthatsnotrelaventrightnow

    Are real robots as cool as Hollywood robots? No. But we’re getting there: very slowly. In fact we’ll probably never get to Hollywood level anyways because of that little distinction you mentioned at the beginning: robots crunch numbers and remember stuff, humans adapt and infer. It’s ludicrously hard to make a number crunching computer adapt or infer with any kind of usefulness. BUT REAL ROBOTS ARE STILL AWESOME! 😁

    September 9, 2019
    Reply
  91. Cody Hackney said:

    I know you get tons of responses and questions but what do you think about BT from Titanfall 2?

    September 10, 2019
    Reply
  92. Hyper Wing said:

    What about soma

    September 10, 2019
    Reply
  93. Adolpha Selrah said:

    I’m autistic and rather asexual, I must be a robot.

    September 10, 2019
    Reply
  94. TFP Radgirl said:

    So where do we place Legion from Mass Effect. Fully human or someqhere in the middle?
    Also please make another video talking about robots with Transformers Prime. I love that show and it's a great example of robots being fully himan and alien.

    September 11, 2019
    Reply
  95. Ave said:

    Gaaaaaaasp you know the animatrix 😮
    (no offense I just love it WAY MORE THAN I SHOULD and I've only met like one other person who's heard of it so)

    September 11, 2019
    Reply
  96. A Random Gal said:

    Not robot relevant but one time in pe we were playing softball and some kid threw a ball right when I walked by in the split second before it would have hit my head I slipped on the grass and fell like in the matrix and everyone in the general area was like omg you just matrixed it and I know it sounds like an and they all clapped but it’s true I swear on my pet snake

    September 12, 2019
    Reply
  97. DerAnanasKing said:

    one of my favorite top tier AI is Cortana.
    in the Halo lore you can read, that UNSC alpha AIs are based on a brain scan of their bests and brightest, in cortanas case Doctor Halsey, which explaines her special relation the John 117 aka the Master chief aka the Deamon.
    Data and the Doctor from star trek TNG and Voyager also fall under this category.

    September 12, 2019
    Reply
  98. DerAnanasKing said:

    one example of a totally logical non evil AI/robot I can think of is the AI from wargame. where at teh end it come to the conclusion "the only winning move is not to play" stating that a war where everyone looses is illogical.

    September 12, 2019
    Reply
  99. DerAnanasKing said:

    reguarding detroit become human…its a david cage game, what do you expect.
    he is known for his aweful stories.

    September 12, 2019
    Reply
  100. DerAnanasKing said:

    how walle would really end.
    humans go back to earth.
    Die immedietly because there is not enough oxygen in the air.

    September 12, 2019
    Reply

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