Space Heater Nonsense


This video will be a little bit different
from most of mine. I’m revisiting a topic from my very first
YouTube days, long before this channel was a thing. At the end, I’ll link to a follow up discussion
on my second channel where I talk about why I’m making this again. But for now, here’s what we’re doing. In the Northern hemisphere, it’s winter
right now. At least, well, at least at the time of this
video’s upload. Winter means cold and cold means sadness. But thankfully, I have a friendly space heater
to keep myself warm and my spirits high. These electric heaters are a useful, if perhaps
dangerous and expensive way to heat a space. But, there’s been something that’s annoyed
me about them for years. And to show you, we need to go shopping. Alright, let’s see what we got here. We have, “Medium Room”, 1,500W for $31.99. Take a step over, and we have “Small Room”, 1,500W. $12.79. Thi… that… that number’s the same. Why is that the same? Here’s a different one. “Medium room”, fif… fifteen hun.. Five.. Wha? OK… Here’s a different one, we got small… fif… hmmm. Well, store #2 is almost entirely out of heaters. Ugh, this is what I get for doing this AFTER
the Polar Vortex. Hmm. There we go. OK, so here we have an infrared quartz radiant
heater, which is being marketed as for medium sized rooms. Shocker of shockers; 1,500W. And also, this
is a radiant heater so really the size of the room isn’t as important as its application
but let’s move on. So here we have a personal desktop heater,
1,500W. This one is apparently some sort of genius,
um, don’t really get that but look at that. 1,500 W. Let’s look at this guy here. It’s a ceramic heater. Uh, 1,500W. One of these 360 degree things. Oh, it’s 1,500W. As you no doubt noticed, at every store we
visited, many of the space heaters for sale were categorized based on the size of the
room that they would be appropriate for. And yet, they were all rated 1500 watts. Now first let me say that there are definitely
reasons to choose some heaters over another. For instance, this infrared radiant heater
will do a great job of keeping you warm even in a cold room, because the infrared radiation
it generates will directly heat your skin and thus body from a distance. They’re even useful outdoors because of
their transmissive style of direct heating. But if you want to heat a space, as in heat
a room and keep it warm, all of these heaters are doing the same thing. They’re heating the air around them and
are thus increasing the temperature in the room. With this goal in mind, literally any of these
heaters will work. And they’re gonna work just as well as any
of the others, with few exceptions. It all comes down to that 1500 watts. Let’s take a step back and think about what
heaters actually have to do. Heat is really just energy, and the temperature
of a room is a way of expressing how much energy is currently concentrated in that room. Now, energy always likes to spread out, and
if there’s a temperature gradient between one space and another, the more highly concentrated
energy in the warm place wants to exit the warm place and spread out into the cold place. Once it reaches equilibrium, energy transfer
stops. And eventually, this leads to the heat death
of the universe. *sound of party blower* Now, to keep a room warm when the outside
is cold, we have to keep releasing energy into it. And we need to add energy at least at the
same rate that it leaves through the walls and windows, which hopefully are well insulated
to slow that process as much as possible. The amount of energy leaving the room is called
the thermal load. Now, I’m going to use the BTU, that’s
British Thermal Unit, for much of this video; I’m sorry for picking that unit, please
write your complaints below. The heater’s basic job is to replace the
energy that’s leaving the room. So if the room is losing 4,000 BTUs per hour
through the walls, that’s the thermal load, and thus we need a heater which can produce at least
4,000 BTUs in order to maintain the current indoor temperature. We’ll need more than that if we want to
increase the temperature. And if we can’t produce 4,000 BTUs, the
room will gradually get colder until the temperature gradient is small enough that energy leaving
equals energy being added, and we hit equilibrium once more. You may be asking what this has to do with
space heaters. Well children, it turns out that watts and
BTUs are both units of the same thing! That’s energy! Hold on, no. Watts are a unit of power, and a watt-hour
is a unit of energy. BTUs makes this confusing because people often
say “BTUs per hour” which I’ve already said at least once but, anyway, it’s a mess. Let’s continue. 1 watt equals 3.41 BTUs. Now, all of these space heaters are labeled
as using 1,500 watts. That means they all produce 5,120 BTUs. All of ‘em. Some of them are even kind enough to tell
you that. So then, I put forth to you dear viewer, how
is this heater more suited to a medium-sized room if it is producing the same exact amount
of heat as this heater which claims to only be suitable for a small room? Regardless of how much energy is leaving a
given space, both of these are capable of adding the same amount of energy back. That’s 5,120 BTUs. Now, we can argue as much as we want about
how these two heaters distribute the heat they create. But I do find it humorous that the one claiming
to be better suited to a larger room doesn’t have a fan to assist heat distribution. Instead it relies solely on the convection
currents that are created as the now hot, low density air rises up through it and pulls
cold, dense air from behind. This heater has a fan blowing air past its
ceramic heating elements. Surely it’s moving more air, you can feel
it. But honestly, it doesn’t need to do much
because of that little thing we call convection. No matter where heat is released into a room,
it will eventually spread out. Using a fan just speeds that process along. And for those who may want to point out that
the fan motor in this guy is part of that 1,500 watts and therefore it must cause the
unit as a whole to release less heat, I’ll counter that in addition to the motor being
a negligible part of the heater’s energy consumption, all of that energy will eventually
be released as heat anyway, either through friction with air molecules, or through the
wasted heat created in the windings of the motor itself. The reason why I know without a doubt that
these two heaters are both doing the same work is that they are both electric resistive
heaters. This means they’re taking the electrical
energy from the wall outlet and releasing it as heat. This is 100% efficient. In fact, when we talk about efficiency of
various household devices like light bulbs or laptops, we’re really talking about how
much waste heat they avoid releasing as they do their work. An incandescent bulb releases a ton of waste
heat, because it needs a lot of electrical energy to produce a given amount of light,
the vast majority of which is simply wasted. An LED bulb releases much less heat, because
LEDs are a more efficient way of turning electricity into visible light, which means less electricity
is consumed by the bulb to do the same amount of work. But if our goal is to create heat, in other
words if the work we want to accomplish is to take that electrical energy and spread
it out into the room as heat, 100% of the energy being consumed will be directly released
into the room. There is no such thing as a more efficient
space heater. There are better and worse applications depending
on the type, such as infrared radiant versus oil-filled convective, but simply put, energy
is energy. If this “medium” heater can’t release
more energy into the room than it’s “small room” counterpart, then those labels are
nonsense. And they are. We don’t even need to rely on the labeling. If we use an energy monitoring device like
this Kill-A-Watt, we can see exactly how much energy each of them is using. And, shocker of shockers, it’s the same
amount, within a small margin of error. Well, some may argue that the margin of error
isn’t quite that small, but in any case it’s pretty humorous that the small heater
is about 90 watts more powerful than the medium heater. Many heaters have multiple settings which
will switch between different heating elements, therefore giving you the option of a more
tepid amount of heat output. And, nearly all of them have a bimetallic
thermostat, if not a digital one, allowing you to control the temperature within a reasonable
degree. You might be asking why so many of them are
rated 1,500W. It turns out that this is the maximum amount of power a device that continuously
operates is allowed to pull from a 15A circuit according to the national electric code. A normal 15A household circuit is technically
capable of 1,800Ws, but if a device is expected to run for a long time, like a space heater,
it’s limited to using 80% of that capacity. This creates a margin for error and protects
against fires caused by not-quite-up-to-snuff wiring, and it also helps prevent overloading
in general. But a device that’s only used intermittently,
like a hair dryer, is allowed to use the full capacity. Since heating elements are phenomenally cheap
and easy to make, pretty much all space heaters are gonna bump right up against that 1,500W
limit. Now, not all of them do. I’m a big fan of these little personal heaters
that only use a couple hundred watts. I keep this one on my desk and it’s a great
little comfort boost on a cold day. But most “General purpose” heaters will
go ahead and push out as much heat as they’re allowed to. Now what was pointed out to me the last time
I made this video was that heaters such as this one store heat in the oil and thus are
able to release heat even when the heating elements aren’t turned on! That’s great, but it doesn’t mean it’s
more efficient. It just means that the heat leaving the heater
goes through a buffer. If the heater is running at a 50% duty cycle,
it more or less is constantly releasing 2,560 BTUs, when this heater would release 5,120
for 5 minutes, and then 0 for the next five minutes. The end result is the same, though, they both
release 2,560 BTUs over 10 minutes–this one may simply provide more consistent heat. If there’s one thing I’d like you to take
away from this video, it’s that any space heater that claims to be more efficient than
its competition is… well its lying. I’m particularly irked by these “premium”
space heaters that claim to save you money on your energy bills because of some new technology. One in particular rhymes with “Schmeeden
Glur”. Look, the way they save you energy is
by… simply being a space heater. That’s by turning down the temperature to
your whole house, and only heating the room that you’re in. Compared to any other space heater, this is
no more efficient and frankly, a waste of money. What’s worse is that electric heat is almost
always the most expensive kind of heat, in fact I made a video on why in cold climates
we usually burn fuels like natural gas for heat rather than use the electric grid. Yes, the heater itself is 100% efficient,
but electricity generation is not. At least not yet. And that’s kind of the space heater paradox. You can save money by using just one and lowering
the temperature of your central heating. But if you decide to buy a bunch of these
supposedly miracle heaters for every room in your house and use them instead of your
furnace, you’re gonna be spending a lot more on energy. But, let me be clear that the only reason
I know these are all the same is that we’re talking about resistive heat. If we venture into the land of heat pumps
or gas-fired furnaces, now there are efficiency comparisons to be made. Some heat pumps work better than others, and
condensing furnaces can release more than 95% of the energy from their heating fuel
into the space, compared to only 80% for a conventional furnace. But any ‘ol electric heater is gonna be
100% efficient. Whatever energy gets pulled from the wall
goes straight into the room. So, the next time you need to buy a space
heater, go ahead and buy a cheap one. Those expensive ones are… well they’re
just not worth it. This $10 wire-element heater will do just
as great of a job heating a room as will a $200 Schleeden Clure. Now don’t get me wrong, this thing is ugly
and noisy and has a primitive thermostat–that red mark is where I like to set it–so I’m
not about to say that this is objectively as good as one of those fancy-pants heaters. But I can say with confidence that it heats
just as well, and the cost of that energy is exactly the same. I will add that if there’s a room that always
needs supplemental heat, like a certain bedroom in a certain house I grew up in, I prefer
the oil-filled type because they’re probably the safest. A fan-forced heater will quickly overheat
if the fan fails, and then you’ve gotta hope that the overheat protection cutout works. These passive ones are pretty much immune
from that failure, and because the heat is spread out over such a large surface area,
nothing really gets that hot. Plus, they’re virtually silent. Which is nice. But, keep in mind that they take FOREVER to
get warm, so they’re really not great for short use. These baseboard style heaters are a nice compromise,
but their surfaces do get much hotter so my gut tells me it’s a little more dangerous. And allow me to express my bewilderment regarding
a companion product for a space heater that doesn’t seem to exist. As I said, pretty much all space heaters have
a thermostat built-in. But let’s be honest, they’re usually not
great. It does regulate the temperature, but it’s
more of a… let it run until the room’s as warm as you want, then slowly turn the
dial down until it shuts off. Not very precise, or consistent. And for those “Digital” heaters, having
the thermostat located within the unit itself (like this) means it will never get a very
precise temperature reading of the room. I’m surprised that you can’t just buy
a universal remote thermostat. I can imagine something like a 10 foot long
heavy-duty extension cord with a thermostat in the middle of it, letting you put it on
a table away from the heater itself, and set an actual temperature. You could actually build one yourself fairly
easily using a thermostat for baseboard heating, but it seems like a product that should just
exist. OK wait, it does exist. Look at that! An outlet thermostat. That’s actually a really good idea. Anyway, that’s it for now. Dishonest marketing departments and misleading
labels are some of the most annoying things we deal with on this planet, but thankfully,
with a little knowledge on how the world works, we can see right through them. Stick around a little longer for a few more
observations regarding my recent space heater adventures, and be sure to check out the Technology
Connections 2 video about why I remade this video. As always, thank you to everyone who supports
the channel on Patreon, especially the fine folks that are scrolling up your screen. With the support of people just like you,
Technology Connections has gone from my hobby to, this! And I’m very thankful for your support. If you would like to support the channel and
get perks like early video access, occasional behind-the-scenes stuff, as well as other
Patreon-exclusive content, please check out my Patreon page. Thank you for your consideration, and I’ll
see you next time! ♫ swelteringly smooth jazz ♫ Alright, so I was ready to buy a heater just
like this one for this video, as Pelonis was among my list of offending manufacturers who
categorize based upon room size. But, at least for oil-filled heaters, they’ve
dropped that. Now it simply says “whole room heater”. They’re apparently not quite out of the
woods yet, as this little thing is marked “small room” even though, you guessed
it, it’s 1,500 watts. But, I will give them credit for this very
handy and truthful guide to which type of space heater is appropriate for which application. Though there were apparently a few render
bugs when it comes to the illustrations. Comfort Zone is still happily slapping room
size suggestions on their products, but notably their oil-filled heaters, at least the ones
for sale here, have gotten smaller and are only rated 1,200 watts now. My guess is that this was a cost-cutting measure,
and if you reduce its physical size and thus surface area you’ll need to lower heat output, too. Both Comfort Zone and Pelonis used to rate
this style as for a “large room”, but perhaps as a result of the 300W reduction,
Comfort Zone has downgraded theirs to only a “medium sized room”. Which is actually even more humorous, because
this medium room heater produces less heat than this small room heater. Go figure. I find this example particularly egregious
because they’re suggesting that a physically larger heater, using the same ceramic heating
element technology, is better for a larger room. It’s got two heating elements! Surely it puts out more heat! No! This is just yet another design that you can
pick from. And hopefully you pick the most profitable
one! Oh. These things. I wonder how many watts this uses. Well, 5,127 prototypes, that’s useful I
guess. I guess I’ll have to look that one up online.

100 Comments

  1. blaine pond said:

    The difference is if it oscillates and the strength of the fan that blows the heat outit can have the same BTUs and Watts but if there's a stronger fan behind all of it it's going to cover more square footage

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  2. blaine pond said:

    That's sneaky how is it going to be efficient without the fan to circulate the air

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  3. blaine pond said:

    Good video dude 👍

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  4. Tony Lam said:

    I noticed that a long time already. The ones that claim storing the heat in oil still have the same basic output but delay some output because of the oil. I am a electrician. The other ratings I noticed are in home improvement stores.You see a big vacuum cleaner or compressor, claiming 2-5 Hp and they plug into a regular wall 15 amp outlet ! A regular outlet by CSA code (Canada) NEC (US) cannot draw more than 80% of a circuit's load, and for 15 amp it is 15 X 120V=1800 X80% =1440 watts. Round it out to 1500, or around 3/4 HP AC for a dedicated circuit for a washer. Even at 3/4 HP, the compressor motor can trip a 15 amp breaker the odd time, so I usually use a 20 amp ( it is legal).Do not confuse the 746 watts DC for a HP. If the lawyers call them, they have a fall back, they can claim the HP is peak, yes when you first turn the vacuum on, it is 5 HP for maybe a couple of milli seconds.I look for the motor actual nameplate amp rating, some manufacturers are so in bed with the appliance maker they deleted the HP on their nameplate as well, but they cannot fool people like me. The auto makers used to play the same trick with different HP ratings.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  5. Tony Lam said:

    It is always the same story, for every ignorant person around, someone are ready to exploit them to their benefit. Be it space heaters , climate change , auto repairs , luxury cars , assault rifles, religions etc The average person are as gullible and naive as a 6 year old, with the same attention span. That is how politicians get away with things and get reelected term after term, like in Calif.etc

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  6. tom mckelley said:

    lighting circuits use 14 gage wire good or 15 amps. outlets use 12 gage wire good or 20 amps. that is code in most places.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  7. Robert Hughes said:

    I once heated my home with an Air Force surplus jet engine and recycled deep fat fryer oil. As I said I only heated it the one time.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  8. steven baxter said:

    Assembly personal must be trained more specifically to their task on the production lines a bad crimping creats a fire risk due to high resistance and heat resulting in potential ignition of flame.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  9. brian pontiff said:

    I use, EXCLUSIVELY, oil radiators, and will never use anything else. They are inexpensive, safe, quiet, efficient, don't have fans to seize up, or burn out, and don't dry out the air.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  10. DOOSH MASTA said:

    I’ve had an outlet thermostat for like 4 years, I use to regulate a box fan during the summer months. It was about $30 on eBay and the instructions were all in Chinese.

    You’re late to the party buddy!

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  11. sleevey said:

    It interesting but I think you are confusing Watts with what hours or volt, amps on transformers. Every heater you see will be ne’er the same because they are all engineered to work off. 110v or 12o volt outlet depending on your provider, if you have 110v outlet to calculate the current draw p=ie. (e is volts, don’t ask) so mathmaticly to find amps or current draw you divide power 1500/by 110b and that gets you 13.63 amps. Most residential outlets are rated for 15amps so with cut breaker degradation over time and surge current when turned on you are about as far as you can be using 1500 watts without blowing the breaker. Now the could have used Newton’s or for temp Kilocalories but watts are about as far as most care or know of. This leaves only what you do with that 14 am-a (rounded up). Ceramic heats fairly fast and once heated the unit just has to maintain so the current isn’t on full bore. The oil filled ones take longer to heat but have much more surface area to radiate head, The there the worst on which for all intensive purpose is just a toaster and maybe a fan>. These are the fire starter , you get quick heat but you do so by drawing max current. They are a line resister of low impedance glowing red hot from current. If you have kids, dogs or even a old house with old wiring do not get a wire or toaster space heater.

    I can appreciate your zeel in pointing out the seeming scam for indentical output but I’m afraid there isn’t a smoking gun, just cheap and fast and unsafe hears and slower constant heat with less risk. Keep up the good work😎

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  12. Vladimir_Bone Spur_tRump said:

    I had one of those oil filled heaters one time and it worked quite well. Until one day when I was in the shower; got out and smelled something really funky. It was smoking and the wall outlet was cherry red. Needless to say, it's long gone. ALL space heaters need to be watched very closely.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  13. zeranzeran said:

    TLDR: They all say 1500 watts

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  14. roger smith said:

    NO logic to this.. heat travel per sqaure inch.. so a full heater moves at 4square inches of heat per secon.. a small one is one quarter.. blowing air around does not generate the same heat.. but learn how friction works first before assuming a blow drier give more heat.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  15. AngryRed Banjo said:

    I have some experience with these type of heaters and would urge you to skip the oscillating design. The wires move inside the unit and eventually break, wear through the insulation, or short out. If you already have one, I would urge you to not use the oscillating feature.

    A word about the ceramic style units; most of them have a filter but even in a clean house you will need to clean it often. If you don’t, dust builds up in the radiator grid and reduces airflow around the perimeter of the grid, increasing the temp at the electrical connections at the corners of the radiator causing burning and failure.

    The radiant ones are nice if you can’t get the air temp up in a large room. They really do “shine” on you like the sun on a cool day. Just be careful what is in front of them, air temp may not go up a lot but surface temps sure can. Most of these unit have a fan to protect the cabinet from overheating and they can be surprisingly loud.

    The oil filled ones are dead silent except for some creaking and popping whey they are first warming up. If you want a quiet one for the bedroom or whatever, that’s the way to go.

    The cool digital controlled one don’t work any better than the bimetallic (mechanical) thermostat ones, as he points out in the video it senses the the temp at the unit not somewhere else in the room. They will “act” the same no matter which style of controls they have.

    There is a basic unit commonly referred to as a “milk house” heater, a simple metal box with louvers on it. Cheap, rugged and safe, if you’re not concerned with appearance, that is the best choice.

    With the exception of the ceramic and oscillation units these small heaters usually die because of thermostat failure. If you are a fix-it kind of person they can be repaired when the eventually fail.

    November 13, 2019
    Reply
  16. Mt man 1949 said:

    So I might as well use my 1500 hair dryer

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  17. Jehosaphet said:

    Great informative video, as always. Quick request? I've always slept with a fan on, a box fan (on low), and I've also always had a roommate. Time and again the argument comes up that I'm wasting too much electricity with my fan running all night….its never NOT been an issue, going on over two decades now. I've read that fans have some of the lowest power usage out of any small appliance, something about their non-friction nature or something. Would you ever do a video about this whole fan argument thing? People seem to think that fans are huge energy suckers; I'm not so sure that's true. Help? Btw thanks for your informative videos…even if its a subject I'm not particularly interested in, you always seem to make them interesting enough to watch anyway. Thank you!

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  18. TENNSUMITSUMA said:

    How did you not get a dmca take down for that song?!

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  19. Frank Lightfoot said:

    Cool video

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  20. M W S said:

    Hopefully we won't get another polar vortex this winter. It hit on my last birthday.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  21. Dr. hillbilly said:

    You are measuring the amount of electric use, not the heat produced. It is like trying to tell how fast a car is by the miles per gallon. You did not measure anything of any value. BTU is a measure of heat. It is the ability to raise 1 pound of water 1 degree from 40 degrees f to 41 degrees. watts is the electricity used.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  22. Pit Viper said:

    This video is a great example of why I heat with wood. I spend 5 bucks on gas and 2 cycle mix and I'm good for the year. Not to many people can say that they only spend 5 dollars for an entire winter. I'm looking at incorporating water into the mix to make it even more efficient and really hold the heat in.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  23. Dale Kim said:

    Thank you

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  24. David Pyper said:

    I wonder how many Engineers fell for this marketing trap?

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  25. Joseph Zugoola said:

    Are you nesh?

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  26. Todd Gunter said:

    Great post. I was waiting for your comment on heat pumps as they are fully electric but only use 1/3 the electricity as these resistance heaters for the same heating. Not space heaters (yet) but a whole house alternative to fossil fuel.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  27. Paul O'Neal said:

    My heater has a fan…

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  28. Paul O'Neal said:

    If you have a room that stays cold then it probably isn't properly insulated.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  29. Don McCready said:

    Good Lord, even us Texans know you can’t heat Space. It’s too damn big.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  30. JENDALL714 said:

    I spent the extra money and got a good one. I paid $300 for mine, it uses 4 x 375 watt screw in heat lamp bulbs. So when the bulbs burn out someday, you just screw in another bulb. The ones sold off the rack at retail stores, use hardwired heat tubes, so once the bulbs burn, that's it, you now have a decorative end table or door stop. Good luck finding the heat tubes if you're lucky enough to know to remove the old tubes and solder in new ones.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  31. V V. said:

    So…. just my 2 cents here and general observation on this subject. You’re not wrong, however what you’re not considering is this- the fan size of those individual units. Yes both heat at a max of 1500watts, but how long does it take for the smaller unit to heat the larger area vs the larger unit with the larger fan. The area that’s being heated would, by your own accounts- take less time at 1500 watts with a larger fan compared to the smaller unit. Both will achieve the goal as long as the outside temp isn’t crazy low and your insulation is relatively anything greater then wet cardboard.

    Past that, you’re only focusing on the max heat output, not the speed in which the units will heat the area.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  32. Just Me said:

    I bet this guy is good with the ladies.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  33. Danny Zuehlsdorf said:

    So I shouldn't heat a room with my hair dryer?

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  34. Black Haze said:

    first off wattage is only there for how much power it draws. you want to go by the BTU rating. BTU rating is the maximum heat output.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  35. Nostrathomas85 said:

    the difference is surface area?

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  36. David Dugas said:

    How dare you?! heating yourself while polar bears are exploding, and penguins and stuff.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  37. Barbarus Bloodshed said:

    4:01 …hahahahaha
    Noice.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  38. Oddman1980 said:

    Watching this video made me wonder about something. I have a vacuum cleaner that uses a 120v outlet, just like that space heater. It claims to have a six horsepower motor, but that's almost three times what the outlet can supply. What's going on there?

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  39. Raver Magik said:

    I dont know how i got here… but a few comments.

    If you need to heat a room.. the best way is to OPEN ALL THE SHADES let the sun in. then pick a window or 2 and put large contractor bags taped on the shade rail.. this will create a thermal heater.. as the sun hits the black bag the space between the bag and window heats up.. and as the hot air rises the cool air is sucked up to be heated. This also will NOT dry your air out. Which means the heat lasts longer. Now that being said.. if you want to use a space heater.. Get a humidifier as well.. DRY air.. cools down faster than humid air. Since space heaters dry the air… you should add moisture to the air so your heat stays longer in the air.

    Lastly i want to mention night time heating.. never use a space heater while sleeping. Instead use a electric blanket. Turn it on low.. like 70 degrees and you wont have to worry about sweating and having to turn it down or off. As well as sleep with thermals or fleece on you wont be cold. I do want to mention sleeping… studies Have shown.. if you sleep in 60 degree air you sleep better.. so if you ARE going to use your full house heater.. Turn it down at night to 60 i can personally say i do sleep better on colder nights than hotter nights and i dream more.

    Its always cheaper to heat the person, rather than the room. One of my mentors taught me that and i live by it.

    Well i think thats all i got.. its 2019 and hopefully your warm.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  40. Lauren Henley said:

    first he ruined portable air conditioners, now he returns to ruin heaters

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  41. dwoodog said:

    This was a really really helpful video, thanks.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  42. carlos oliveira said:

    You obviously don't have a clue.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  43. Perrito Chihuahua said:

    Cableado Electrico eso es el por que no mas de 1500 watts,😁😜

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  44. charles hetrick said:

    Whata’bout the ballast in the LED bulb?

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  45. jon williams said:

    Put a box fan behind the space heater.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  46. Scott Breseke said:

    Yes, your understanding of the universe is basically flawed. The various heaters are not equal in their ability to quickly transfer their heat to the room. Larger heating elements transfer heat faster. Fans in the unit can increase the speed of heat transfer. My espresso machine is also 1500 watt, but does not heat up my room as well as the space heater does.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  47. charles hetrick said:

    But it’s infrared heat which is better than regular heat.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  48. TooLooze said:

    When I returned to a cold climate in an older house, I tried the oil units. He was right; they take forever. In the ten years since then, I've used the same cheapo Pelonis brand heaters from my mom and pop hardware stores. They last two or three years and work well for temporarily heating rooms. My power bill seems pretty reasonable even using in a couple rooms at a time.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  49. Charles Cox said:

    Are you sure it's 100% efficient? Some of them actually generated light. I'm fairly certain that light energy is energy.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  50. tavern2468 said:

    I live in Florida…

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  51. Spider Mcgavenport said:

    Interesting enough to keep space heaters lasting longer be sure to leave your space heaters fan to cool them off as you turn them off otherwise all that heat gets trapped in the top where the components just cook.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  52. Keeth Squinters said:

    The heaters without fans and the smaller heaters will turn off when the heater becomes dangerously hot, thus they are not as good for lheating a large room. Heat and power are not synonimous. Btu's are always a measurement of heat. Im not a physicist, but i think this guy may be a bit incorrect. Ok finished watching and there are some good points contained therein.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  53. Transane said:

    There is a very simple reason for this. It's a liability issue. The average household outlet (Nema 5-15) is rated for approximately 15 Amps. 20 Amp outlets (Nema 5-20) are more common in modern installations, but the heater must be designed for worst case scenario. In the united states standard household voltage is 120VAC. Power /Voltage = Amperage. 1500 Watts / 120 Volts = 12.5 Amps. This allows for a slight factor of safety and is common electrical engineering practice. Additionally, supply voltage can vary by as much as 15% on an average day, which as a result will draw more amperage. Source: I'm a mechanical engineer who specializes in designing environmental test chambers for the aerospace industry. It's funny- I purchased the identical heater of you and while shopping I came to the same realization and hence, this conclusion.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  54. Aaron Schumacher said:

    Wattage has not a lot to do with why they suggest a room size. Fan size and how long a certain heater can run has more to do with it.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  55. zillow131 said:

    Thanks for explaining.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  56. Tobie Allen II said:

    Bonfire 🔥 for the win

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  57. Tobie Allen II said:

    Love that background store music

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  58. Richard Smith said:

    They aren't technically 100% efficient. A very small amount of the power is converted into light 🙂 I know, splitting hairs 😛 They do have a perfect power factor though, in that the current is perfectly lined up with the voltage.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  59. Bill Kerr said:

    I've been playing with infrared heating panels. Pretty cool stuff. 400 & 600W units provide very good comfort at much lower home thermostat settings. It takes some care to install them where they will be effective and they do warm up slowly but they seem effective at reducing overall energy consumption in my all electric house in Texas. I am keeping careful records through the winter to get a firm understanding of whether they can be relied upon to save energy.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  60. The Tinker said:

    we perfer the oil filled space heaters as when the thermostat shuts down the heater is still giving ff heat but the forced air heater when the heater shuts down no heat
    so its cheaper to use an oil filled heater and yes they are electric

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  61. B Sc said:

    When the libtard govt forced the #climahoax tax on my province, the piddly amount of super clean burning NG I used was given a 300% tax on top. Yes thats right. i used 5$ gas all month, and $15 tax was added on top. THEN THEY ADD NEAR $60 admin and "carry fees" on top of that. Before its all RE TAXED at 5% GST.

    ALL THIS WHEN i heat the house 15c when present and let it go down to 11C when I sleep or leave. Thats why few visitors. And many sweaters. We have 6 months winter here. We know cold (but no idea about sneedon Gleures)

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  62. Glenn Webster said:

    They pull the same wattage as a hair dryer on high.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  63. Gary Schultz said:

    A Watt is a watt, and a BTU is a BTU, Butt……….
    Coil Heaters use 1500 watts, but produce less BTU's….. they suck !
    Ceramic and oil heaters are best. They producs higher BTU's at 1500 watts !

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  64. Randy Levine said:

    I think it has to do with fan size and rpm… Bigger fans will move more air faster thus heating a given volume quicker, thus equaling the time it would take a smaller fan to heat a smaller room using the same wattage (to a point, of course) … People want smaller 'looking' fans in smaller rooms because they look better and are quieter…. In other words you don't want a big fan in a small room as it might be too overpowering for the space, and 'look' to big and bulky…. And about internal thermostats. They are typically calibrated to take into account the enclosure's effect on the temperature.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  65. Aaron Peterson said:

    yay heatpumps

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  66. Daniel Griffith said:

    The 20-30 dollar space heater is the way to go. You want one that shuts off if it gets knocked over, and has a few settings. Mine has 3 settings for the fan and 2 for using one or two elements (High and Low settings). I have mine on a wall timer plugged into a surge protector.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  67. friedchicken said:

    my house's poor insulation has been melting the ice caps

    November 14, 2019
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  68. Aaron Peterson said:

    noise and duty cycle

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  69. Gene Pull said:

    Why do homosexuals think that emphasizing their S's makes them sound feminine? It only makes you sound like a homosexual.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  70. Mike Sadlier said:

    What about heat loss thru venting ducts on a central heat system which in room heating devices don't have?

    November 14, 2019
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  71. Dale Allen said:

    1500 watts = 12.5 amps which is the max amps on 14-2 wiring in residential housing.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  72. Marvin Bennett said:

    I got a small Pelonis heater . I crack my bedroom door slightly and this lil MF will blow your sox off. I keep my actual heating unit for the house at around 75 .

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  73. Alter Schwede said:

    Talkalotofcrap

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  74. Alter Schwede said:

    Brexit now, please. And stay out

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  75. Joseph Turner said:

    The thermostat product that you describe and claim doesn't exist- well, it DOES exist. You can find it in the same section of hardware stores as the kerosene "salamander" heaters they were designed to be used with. Nearly every construction contractor who works during the winter owns one. And the one you found at the store (where you said "oh wait, it does exist") is a bad choice, because typical outlets are too close to the ground whereas proper thermostat location is roughly the mid distance between the floor and the ceiling.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  76. Brent Krause said:

    Wattage has nothing to do with the size of a room.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  77. Christian Koehler said:

    Maybe those "large space" heaters are just more durable. At the same 1,500W the thing has to run longer to heat up a larger room than a smaller room and it has to run more frequently to keep it warm.

    A larger device with a larger fan can deal with that thermal load more easily. Probably it's even safer.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  78. Rau Kenneth said:

    Just shows how stupid the average consumer is.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  79. Lewis Brand said:

    V = I R , Ohm's Law. Simple

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  80. joodies g said:

    it is because 1500 watts is the energy it is pulling from the wall, but warmth is measured not in watts, but in BTU or Joules. So Basically, they are all the same power but some are more efficient than others, (more expensive=more efficient=more heat for the same electricity) usually

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  81. John Flaherty said:

    I'm not following why you're so irked by the markings on space heaters. Green energy has NEVER lived up to its billing, even when pushed by government programs. So, we shouldn't be surprised when most claims by space heater manufacturers are full of smelly bull. Remember, most heaters care far less about being scientifically accurate, far more about…selling product.

    Incidentally though, as I think about it, the marketing may be perfectly accurate. Though perhaps not quite the way you think. Power consumed isn't the only matter involved, means of heat transfer also plays in. I consider that convection heater likely more efficient. Because the air only rises because it's warmed (energy has been conducted), it's likely warmer when it leaves the heater than is the air coming through the fan. That is, the air coming from the convection heater likely possesses more joules per milliliter (or horsepower or BTU per cubic inch) basis than does the air coming through the fanned heater. Then too, the fan will cause more energy to disperse more quickly, as opposed to natural air currents–the convection part–dispersing the heat throughout the room much more gradually.
    Of course, neither heater will work very well if there's any drafting from windows or other openings.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  82. bigpappahemi426 said:

    Entropy sucks more during winter, I guess?

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  83. Andrew Riegel said:

    I thought it was about the "BTU's" not the Watts …but then huh….I know I have the left one…works well tho.. I'm in Oklahoma

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  84. Bandedcookie said:

    The only time i buy a more expensive heater for say 20 or 30 bucks, is if i know for a fact, it is better made than the el-cheapo heater. I hate having a heater last about 2 weeks then breaking.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  85. jenbill1602 said:

    So my supposedly new and improved heater is just a change in labeling kind of like the new and improved flavor of cat food has anyone put it to the test Ahahahahahaha!

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  86. Jay Dee said:

    I have to disagree to some point. If you stick a piece of resistive wire into the socket about 1 foot long as thick as a coathanger and have it drain 1500 watts, it will use 1500 watts but will produce bugger all heat. If you have a really long resistive wire then it will produce heat more efficiently. So those tiny heaters aren't as good as the larger once. If you look inside them you will see the wire is very thick. I have tried both and my larger heater with a fan is much more efficient. You really need to do some scientific comparisons. JD

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  87. I am gone forever said:

    Well i have more compact space heater that uses 2000w

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  88. Shannon Denham said:

    I knew being cheap would pay off

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  89. Yumpin Yiminy said:

    I never noticed they are all the same wattage thus the same energy.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  90. Jim Man said:

    all i know is if i put even one of the 6×6 space heaters with a fan rated @ 1500 watts, near me to stay warm and leave it on 24/7, my electric bill jumps almost $80 to $100 a month. so no matter what size heater if it,s 1500 watts my electric bill almost doubles. my electric bill is usually around $130. a month running just one big or small don't matter, 1500 watt electric heater will run my bill up as much as $210 to $230 a month. this is using it in conjunction with the propane house heater which runs me about $300 to $400 a year which is also used to cook with. a kerosene jet heater @ 110,000 BTU's heats a hell of a lot faster and warmer when set to kick on and off with it's thermostat and it's cheaper, costing me around $20 for 5 gallons of K1 kerosene. i can get by turning it off when not needed and get by with $40 to $80 a month depending how hot i want it and how often i use it. the thing is with only the propane heater running it still gets chilly in some spots. but no way will i run an electric heater. they have gotten crazy with the cost per watt of electricity, compared to other things that can be used for heat.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  91. Mig Mo said:

    go buy a fat ugly woman a hot chocolate and insulate a cardboard refrigerator box and get snacks, Bingo!!! Hot as two rats who discovered a viagara pill in a Wool Sock.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  92. John smith said:

    The high wattage small heaters are for use in the work place where you do not pay the electric bill.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  93. jay kaye said:

    Great video!! You expose the lies we're feed in our daily brainwashing diet.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  94. Jack Dale said:

    you SAID the RADIENT-HEATERS are the "best", because the exposed SKIN is heated, rather than the entire-room with the others. Wouldn't the "fire-hazard" for the radient types also be Greater? Still, if I had my choice, I think I'd GIVE oil-filled radiators to Family, and buy a radient for myself that I'd move from room-room with me, where-ever I am in the house at the time.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  95. Leo D said:

    There is no way that a resistant heater is 100% efficient. The glow of the filaments is energy wasted as light energy.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  96. Toni Moon said:

    Was expecting to see astronauts all warm n cozy on the shuttle 🤘

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  97. Major Payne said:

    Turn your hair dryer on … same.
    So much of a fire hazard, many peeps just don’t understand.
    A couple years down the road after running awhile one can tear 8’ of drywall out to replace your 14-2 wire that’s been ‘cooked’ by the poor wire insulation made brittle by the constant amp draw and connections to other circuits w/ the neutrals.
    Portable heaters… keeping fire persons and electricians at work for many, many years!

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  98. Brian said:

    Doesn’t really matter how many stores you go to if you’re only looking at one single brand of heater. They’re obviously going to say the same thing because you’re looking at the same thing.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  99. Brian said:

    It all comes down to whether or not there is a fan blowing on the heat source, actually. When you blow a fan on the heat source it cools it by moving the warmed air away from the heat source and out into the room.

    November 14, 2019
    Reply
  100. Mark Freedman said:

    You are right! Excellent video

    November 14, 2019
    Reply

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