Science can answer moral questions | Sam Harris


I’m going to speak today about the relationship between science and human values. Now, it’s generally understood that questions of morality — questions of good and evil and right and wrong — are questions about which science officially has no opinion. It’s thought that science can help us get what we value, but it can never tell us what we ought to value. And, consequently, most people — I think most people probably here — think that science will never answer the most important questions in human life: questions like, “What is worth living for?” “What is worth dying for?” “What constitutes a good life?” So, I’m going to argue that this is an illusion — that the separation between science and human values is an illusion — and actually quite a dangerous one at this point in human history. Now, it’s often said that science cannot give us a foundation for morality and human values, because science deals with facts, and facts and values seem to belong to different spheres. It’s often thought that there’s no description of the way the world is that can tell us how the world ought to be. But I think this is quite clearly untrue. Values are a certain kind of fact. They are facts about the well-being of conscious creatures. Why is it that we don’t have ethical obligations toward rocks? Why don’t we feel compassion for rocks? It’s because we don’t think rocks can suffer. And if we’re more concerned about our fellow primates than we are about insects, as indeed we are, it’s because we think they’re exposed to a greater range of potential happiness and suffering. Now, the crucial thing to notice here is that this is a factual claim: This is something that we could be right or wrong about. And if we have misconstrued the relationship between biological complexity and the possibilities of experience well then we could be wrong about the inner lives of insects. And there’s no notion, no version of human morality and human values that I’ve ever come across that is not at some point reducible to a concern about conscious experience and its possible changes. Even if you get your values from religion, even if you think that good and evil ultimately relate to conditions after death — either to an eternity of happiness with God or an eternity of suffering in hell — you are still concerned about consciousness and its changes. And to say that such changes can persist after death is itself a factual claim, which, of course, may or may not be true. Now, to speak about the conditions of well-being in this life, for human beings, we know that there is a continuum of such facts. We know that it’s possible to live in a failed state, where everything that can go wrong does go wrong — where mothers cannot feed their children, where strangers cannot find the basis for peaceful collaboration, where people are murdered indiscriminately. And we know that it’s possible to move along this continuum towards something quite a bit more idyllic, to a place where a conference like this is even conceivable. And we know — we know — that there are right and wrong answers to how to move in this space. Would adding cholera to the water be a good idea? Probably not. Would it be a good idea for everyone to believe in the evil eye, so that when bad things happened to them they immediately blame their neighbors? Probably not. There are truths to be known about how human communities flourish, whether or not we understand these truths. And morality relates to these truths. So, in talking about values we are talking about facts. Now, of course our situation in the world can be understood at many levels — from the level of the genome on up to the level of economic systems and political arrangements. But if we’re going to talk about human well-being we are, of necessity, talking about the human brain. Because we know that our experience of the world and of ourselves within it is realized in the brain — whatever happens after death. Even if the suicide bomber does get 72 virgins in the afterlife, in this life, his personality — his rather unfortunate personality — is the product of his brain. So the contributions of culture — if culture changes us, as indeed it does, it changes us by changing our brains. And so therefore whatever cultural variation there is in how human beings flourish can, at least in principle, be understood in the context of a maturing science of the mind — neuroscience, psychology, etc. So, what I’m arguing is that value’s reduced to facts — to facts about the conscious experience of conscious beings. And we can therefore visualize a space of possible changes in the experience of these beings. And I think of this as kind of a moral landscape, with peaks and valleys that correspond to differences in the well-being of conscious creatures, both personal and collective. And one thing to notice is that perhaps there are states of human well-being that we rarely access, that few people access. And these await our discovery. Perhaps some of these states can be appropriately called mystical or spiritual. Perhaps there are other states that we can’t access because of how our minds are structured but other minds possibly could access them. Now, let me be clear about what I’m not saying. I’m not saying that science is guaranteed to map this space, or that we will have scientific answers to every conceivable moral question. I don’t think, for instance, that you will one day consult a supercomputer to learn whether you should have a second child, or whether we should bomb Iran’s nuclear facilities, or whether you can deduct the full cost of TED as a business expense. (Laughter) But if questions affect human well-being then they do have answers, whether or not we can find them. And just admitting this — just admitting that there are right and wrong answers to the question of how humans flourish — will change the way we talk about morality, and will change our expectations of human cooperation in the future. For instance, there are 21 states in our country where corporal punishment in the classroom is legal, where it is legal for a teacher to beat a child with a wooden board, hard, and raising large bruises and blisters and even breaking the skin. And hundreds of thousands of children, incidentally, are subjected to this every year. The locations of these enlightened districts, I think, will fail to surprise you. We’re not talking about Connecticut. And the rationale for this behavior is explicitly religious. The creator of the universe himself has told us not to spare the rod, lest we spoil the child — this is in Proverbs 13 and 20, and I believe, 23. But we can ask the obvious question: Is it a good idea, generally speaking, to subject children to pain and violence and public humiliation as a way of encouraging healthy emotional development and good behavior? (Laughter) Is there any doubt that this question has an answer, and that it matters? Now, many of you might worry that the notion of well-being is truly undefined, and seemingly perpetually open to be re-construed. And so, how therefore can there be an objective notion of well-being? Well, consider by analogy, the concept of physical health. The concept of physical health is undefined. As we just heard from Michael Specter, it has changed over the years. When this statue was carved the average life expectancy was probably 30. It’s now around 80 in the developed world. There may come a time when we meddle with our genomes in such a way that not being able to run a marathon at age 200 will be considered a profound disability. People will send you donations when you’re in that condition. (Laughter) Notice that the fact that the concept of health is open, genuinely open for revision, does not make it vacuous. The distinction between a healthy person and a dead one is about as clear and consequential as any we make in science. Another thing to notice is there may be many peaks on the moral landscape: There may be equivalent ways to thrive; there may be equivalent ways to organize a human society so as to maximize human flourishing. Now, why wouldn’t this undermine an objective morality? Well think of how we talk about food: I would never be tempted to argue to you that there must be one right food to eat. There is clearly a range of materials that constitute healthy food. But there’s nevertheless a clear distinction between food and poison. The fact that there are many right answers to the question, “What is food?” does not tempt us to say that there are no truths to be known about human nutrition. Many people worry that a universal morality would require moral precepts that admit of no exceptions. So, for instance, if it’s really wrong to lie, it must always be wrong to lie, and if you can find an exception, well then there’s no such thing as moral truth. Why would we think this? Consider, by analogy, the game of chess. Now, if you’re going to play good chess, a principle like, “Don’t lose your Queen,” is very good to follow. But it clearly admits some exceptions. There are moments when losing your Queen is a brilliant thing to do. There are moments when it is the only good thing you can do. And yet, chess is a domain of perfect objectivity. The fact that there are exceptions here does not change that at all. Now, this brings us to the sorts of moves that people are apt to make in the moral sphere. Consider the great problem of women’s bodies: What to do about them? Well this is one thing you can do about them: You can cover them up. Now, it is the position, generally speaking, of our intellectual community that while we may not like this, we might think of this as “wrong” in Boston or Palo Alto, who are we to say that the proud denizens of an ancient culture are wrong to force their wives and daughters to live in cloth bags? And who are we to say, even, that they’re wrong to beat them with lengths of steel cable, or throw battery acid in their faces if they decline the privilege of being smothered in this way? Well, who are we not to say this? Who are we to pretend that we know so little about human well-being that we have to be non-judgmental about a practice like this? I’m not talking about voluntary wearing of a veil — women should be able to wear whatever they want, as far as I’m concerned. But what does voluntary mean in a community where, when a girl gets raped, her father’s first impulse, rather often, is to murder her out of shame? Just let that fact detonate in your brain for a minute: Your daughter gets raped, and what you want to do is kill her. What are the chances that represents a peak of human flourishing? Now, to say this is not to say that we have got the perfect solution in our own society. For instance, this is what it’s like to go to a newsstand almost anywhere in the civilized world. Now, granted, for many men it may require a degree in philosophy to see something wrong with these images. (Laughter) But if we are in a reflective mood, we can ask, “Is this the perfect expression of psychological balance with respect to variables like youth and beauty and women’s bodies?” I mean, is this the optimal environment in which to raise our children? Probably not. OK, so perhaps there’s some place on the spectrum between these two extremes that represents a place of better balance. (Applause) Perhaps there are many such places — again, given other changes in human culture there may be many peaks on the moral landscape. But the thing to notice is that there will be many more ways not to be on a peak. Now the irony, from my perspective, is that the only people who seem to generally agree with me and who think that there are right and wrong answers to moral questions are religious demagogues of one form or another. And of course they think they have right answers to moral questions because they got these answers from a voice in a whirlwind, not because they made an intelligent analysis of the causes and condition of human and animal well-being. In fact, the endurance of religion as a lens through which most people view moral questions has separated most moral talk from real questions of human and animal suffering. This is why we spend our time talking about things like gay marriage and not about genocide or nuclear proliferation or poverty or any other hugely consequential issue. But the demagogues are right about one thing: We need a universal conception of human values. Now, what stands in the way of this? Well, one thing to notice is that we do something different when talking about morality — especially secular, academic, scientist types. When talking about morality we value differences of opinion in a way that we don’t in any other area of our lives. So, for instance the Dalai Lama gets up every morning meditating on compassion, and he thinks that helping other human beings is an integral component of human happiness. On the other hand, we have someone like Ted Bundy; Ted Bundy was very fond of abducting and raping and torturing and killing young women. So, we appear to have a genuine difference of opinion about how to profitably use one’s time. (Laughter) Most Western intellectuals look at this situation and say, “Well, there’s nothing for the Dalai Lama to be really right about — really right about — or for Ted Bundy to be really wrong about that admits of a real argument that potentially falls within the purview of science. He likes chocolate, he likes vanilla. There’s nothing that one should be able to say to the other that should persuade the other.” Notice that we don’t do this in science. On the left you have Edward Witten. He’s a string theorist. If you ask the smartest physicists around who is the smartest physicist around, in my experience half of them will say Ed Witten. The other half will tell you they don’t like the question. (Laughter) So, what would happen if I showed up at a physics conference and said,”String theory is bogus. It doesn’t resonate with me. It’s not how I chose to view the universe at a small scale. I’m not a fan.” (Laughter) Well, nothing would happen because I’m not a physicist; I don’t understand string theory. I’m the Ted Bundy of string theory. (Laughter) I wouldn’t want to belong to any string theory club that would have me as a member. But this is just the point. Whenever we are talking about facts certain opinions must be excluded. That is what it is to have a domain of expertise. That is what it is for knowledge to count. How have we convinced ourselves that in the moral sphere there is no such thing as moral expertise, or moral talent, or moral genius even? How have we convinced ourselves that every opinion has to count? How have we convinced ourselves that every culture has a point of view on these subjects worth considering? Does the Taliban have a point of view on physics that is worth considering? No. (Laughter) How is their ignorance any less obvious on the subject of human well-being? (Applause) So, this, I think, is what the world needs now. It needs people like ourselves to admit that there are right and wrong answers to questions of human flourishing, and morality relates to that domain of facts. It is possible for individuals, and even for whole cultures, to care about the wrong things, which is to say that it’s possible for them to have beliefs and desires that reliably lead to needless human suffering. Just admitting this will transform our discourse about morality. We live in a world in which the boundaries between nations mean less and less, and they will one day mean nothing. We live in a world filled with destructive technology, and this technology cannot be uninvented; it will always be easier to break things than to fix them. It seems to me, therefore, patently obvious that we can no more respect and tolerate vast differences in notions of human well-being than we can respect or tolerate vast differences in the notions about how disease spreads, or in the safety standards of buildings and airplanes. We simply must converge on the answers we give to the most important questions in human life. And to do that, we have to admit that these questions have answers. Thank you very much. (Applause) Chris Anderson: So, some combustible material there. Whether in this audience or people elsewhere in the world, hearing some of this, may well be doing the screaming-with-rage thing, after as well, some of them. Language seems to be really important here. When you’re talking about the veil, you’re talking about women dressed in cloth bags. I’ve lived in the Muslim world, spoken with a lot of Muslim women. And some of them would say something else. They would say, “No, you know, this is a celebration of female specialness, it helps build that and it’s a result of the fact that” — and this is arguably a sophisticated psychological view — “that male lust is not to be trusted.” I mean, can you engage in a conversation with that kind of woman without seeming kind of cultural imperialist? Sam Harris: Yeah, well I think I tried to broach this in a sentence, watching the clock ticking, but the question is: What is voluntary in a context where men have certain expectations, and you’re guaranteed to be treated in a certain way if you don’t veil yourself? And so, if anyone in this room wanted to wear a veil, or a very funny hat, or tattoo their face — I think we should be free to voluntarily do whatever we want, but we have to be honest about the constraints that these women are placed under. And so I think we shouldn’t be so eager to always take their word for it, especially when it’s 120 degrees out and you’re wearing a full burqa. CA: A lot of people want to believe in this concept of moral progress. But can you reconcile that? I think I understood you to say that you could reconcile that with a world that doesn’t become one dimensional, where we all have to think the same. Paint your picture of what rolling the clock 50 years forward, 100 years forward, how you would like to think of the world, balancing moral progress with richness. SH: Well, I think once you admit that we are on the path toward understanding our minds at the level of the brain in some important detail, then you have to admit that we are going to understand all of the positive and negative qualities of ourselves in much greater detail. So, we’re going to understand positive social emotion like empathy and compassion, and we’re going to understand the factors that encourage it — whether they’re genetic, whether they’re how people talk to one another, whether they’re economic systems, and insofar as we begin to shine light on that we are inevitably going to converge on that fact space. So, everything is not going to be up for grabs. It’s not going to be like veiling my daughter from birth is just as good as teaching her to be confident and well-educated in the context of men who do desire women. I mean I don’t think we need an NSF grant to know that compulsory veiling is a bad idea — but at a certain point we’re going to be able to scan the brains of everyone involved and actually interrogate them. Do people love their daughters just as much in these systems? And I think there are clearly right answers to that. CA: And if the results come out that actually they do, are you prepared to shift your instinctive current judgment on some of these issues? SH: Well yeah, modulo one obvious fact, that you can love someone in the context of a truly delusional belief system. So, you can say like, “Because I knew my gay son was going to go to hell if he found a boyfriend, I chopped his head off. And that was the most compassionate thing I could do.” If you get all those parts aligned, yes I think you could probably be feeling the emotion of love. But again, then we have to talk about well-being in a larger context. It’s all of us in this together, not one man feeling ecstasy and then blowing himself up on a bus. CA: Sam, this is a conversation I would actually love to continue for hours. We don’t have that, but maybe another time. Thank you for coming to TED. SH: Really an honor. Thank you. (Applause)

100 Comments

  1. Abin Mathew Abraham said:

    Again… How?

    June 26, 2019
    Reply
  2. Michael Rivera said:

    One thing Sam left out is that our so called internal moral compass was designed by evolution to help secure our prosperity So morality has that consequential out to come as the objective basis for morality

    June 26, 2019
    Reply
  3. Pierre Beckmann said:

    Is never implies ought

    June 26, 2019
    Reply
  4. kukalakana said:

    Did not say how science can tell us what is worth living for (which was the question raised at the beginning of this talk).

    June 26, 2019
    Reply
  5. Louise said:

    Religion is the reason for women in veils, capitalism is the reason for almost naked women on magazine covers. Both need improvement.

    June 26, 2019
    Reply
  6. Stinky Monkey said:

    I couldn’t even believe what I was hearing. This guy got up in front of all those people showing off how stupid he is. Post a video for everyone to see and is shameless, ignorant fool. I started to laugh towards the middle of this.

    June 26, 2019
    Reply
  7. TheGreyHollowRoad said:

    The most ridiculous title for a speech EVER. Why? Well, "morality" is not a natural thing. It's not made of atoms, it's not made of energy, it has no mass, and doesn't take up space. Science deals with the NATURAL world, and so has nothing to say about morality even existing. Sam Harris is literally pointing out that God exists when he claims immaterial morality is a real thing in this natural material world. You need an outside immaterial standard for morality. I thought Harris wanted to argue for atheism. 🙂

    June 26, 2019
    Reply
  8. ArizonahasCactus said:

    Sam. Just knocking another one over center field. He's like the Mickey Mantle of clear reasoning.

    June 27, 2019
    Reply
  9. 222Lightning said:

    The initial idea that we could be wrong that your cat's pain and happiness is more important than the cockroach you squashed in your kitchen last night is something I've pondered. Or a garden spider in the middle of the pines is less worthy of being recognized as a being with desires and disappointments than someone in prison for mass murder. Its all relative to how it moves "your tribe" forward. We are not programmed to create some perfect society where no ones feelings get hurt. The tribe of people behind this notion doesn't practice this in their own country! What we are programmed for is serving "your tribe" and that is directly related to morality. I like to watch these old Indian and Cowboy movies….in how intricate the interaction was between the "Us and the Them" is portrayed. Sometimes their is mercy between the savagery. We are not better than "animals" or "insects"…….we exist in a different "bandwith" than them. Do humans possess some "morals" given from god.????…..….if you examine history……..basically their are good times and their are bad times of "group violence" or war. All groups of humans have wared amongst each other since whenever and when we weren't at war w them it was amongst each other. When you look at someone else or a living thing……..you have an instinctual judgement of them on a genetic level. Is that the moral of science programmed in our DNA?

    June 27, 2019
    Reply
  10. Raman Deep Vashisht said:

    Support for Beating kids in classroom is not entirely on religious basis. I'm an atheist and i support the principle behind this. Obviously brutal beating is inhumane but for little kids a believable threat of physical punishment is sometimes necessary. For eg, a mild slap by teacher to a kid who beats another kid and don't stop even after explaining>counseling>warnings i.e. failing to behave with civility after three fair chances.

    June 27, 2019
    Reply
  11. Warwick The Kingmaker said:

    Arbitrarily deciding that morality is about the well being of humans doesn't make it objective and answerable by science. I can easily object and claim that the highest moral good is to exterminate all humans, or that it is about the well being of animals rather than just humans, which would still mean that exterminatus of humans would be the way to go.

    Generalizing and saying that humans evolved to value certain things is nothing but a generalization that you aren't allowed to make. Objective moral values can't be decided by majority vote because then they aren't objective, and clearly there are exceptions to the claims about human moral values.

    June 28, 2019
    Reply
  12. John Oliveira said:

    There got to be a moral standard.

    June 28, 2019
    Reply
  13. Bmchaney Bmchaney said:

    you do see the general Truth on Matter and that's what I love about you

    June 29, 2019
    Reply
  14. Agent L said:

    11:56 he's really emotional not to cry so much

    June 29, 2019
    Reply
  15. brianandcindy1 said:

    He is ignoring an underlying assumption that cannot be derived from science–that life and flourishing are better than death and suffering, and that we should want that for everyone, not just ourselves. Now that we value life and flourishing, we can use science to help bring those about.

    June 29, 2019
    Reply
  16. Supreme Reader said:

    Sam has two daughters, you can really see he’s thinking about that at 11:26.

    July 1, 2019
    Reply
  17. Mark Simmons said:

    Emotional arguments to attack religion. Sounds like Sam Harris to me.

    July 2, 2019
    Reply
  18. Laurent Bajrami said:

    Where real men cried

    July 2, 2019
    Reply
  19. Auxtas said:

    Brilliant but Sam gave a wrong answer to the issue. Science is secondary to the “ought.” The ought comes before the act to better our life. What science does is not to teach us why you should love and be charitable rather it is devising a means to get to those values. On issue if abortion science says it’s a baby in the womb even though some say it’s a tissue. But science doesn’t give it values and dignity and that’s why it is arguing about pain stage abortion. Still to show that science doesn’t teach ethics, hat argument no longer hold for them because they now struggle with mother’s right. However human right is not a scientific discipline.

    July 3, 2019
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  20. Auxtas said:

    Sam Harris one question for your argument. What is the scientific stand on the morality of abortion?

    July 3, 2019
    Reply
  21. Edward Paterson said:

    One of sams major miscalculations is that he sees religious people following rules just because they are written in a sacred text. but that doesn't account for people who come to religion because through experience, recognize the value of the practices. theres also people who may give a sacred text the benifit of the doubt, and yet find ways to test and verify the validity of a rule. however, dont get me wrong, I do love sam and his sense of logic.

    July 5, 2019
    Reply
  22. Baelor Mournfang said:

    Wow… he makes quite a leap from values to facts. He doesn't go deep enough.
    Understandeable, since he also argues that there is no free will. So what does morality even matter?

    July 5, 2019
    Reply
  23. Austin said:

    False. Science can help us make informed decisions consistent with our values, but science cannot tell us what our ultimate values should be.

    July 6, 2019
    Reply
  24. smart guy in a hoodie said:

    Without beating children there would be no Beethoven.

    July 6, 2019
    Reply
  25. Yuri Yu said:

    Well, at the beginning he states a false: “the science deals with facts”… it supposed to do so but now scientists decided to explain my origin, meaning and destiny. That’s not a science anymore, it’s another religion.

    July 6, 2019
    Reply
  26. keepa1 said:

    A bunch of incoherent emotional observations which do not answer the question at all. The Islam example actually proves the anti-thesis. Why is that wrong from a materialist perspective? Why is the opposite, the hyper-sexuality in the West, wrong from a materialist perspective? The materialist cannot give a satisfactory answer.

    He consistently makes the same error throughout his talk, he confounds different categories of knowledge. Moral questions cannot be answered by a materialist framework, scientific questions cannot be answered by a moral framework. Attempting to shoehorn all categories of knowledge under materialism fails from the start.

    July 6, 2019
    Reply
  27. John Dillick said:

    Very interesting and thought provoking topic and talk. I'd love to play devil's advocate for a moment. We saw the stark stratification present with the evocation from the values of rock, ant, ape. This suggests there is an objective hierarchy of value around conscience, and indeed Sam concentrates his focus on obtainable objective landscapes of morality in the sphere of "well-being" to some extent around the idea of sentience or consciousness, and perhaps around the awareness of being and suffering. However, consider adding a few more items to the list: a coma patient, a person under complete anesthesia, human fetus. With this new set, the moral landscape becomes much harder to partition, and we become far less certain of the wisdom in the attempt.

    Although we are tempted to use the analogy of science to see these data points as "facts" or "truth", I'm disinclined to agree. Gravity and electromagnetism simply are, and the truth of them is an inescapable reality. Does morality objectively exist and is it true? What if the well-being of the human race means the eradication of 3/4 of the world population because the Earth's biospheres cannot sustain the burden of the current human population? Does that make the extermination of billions of people a peak in the landscape of morality?

    What if we discover that the sun going to inflate to a red giant in precisely 10 days, wiping out all the planetary bodies in our solar system? Should I share my extra bread with a starving man?

    July 9, 2019
    Reply
  28. Kevin FitzMaurice said:

    “Almost all the questions of interest to speculative minds are such as science cannot answer.” —Bertrand Russell

    July 9, 2019
    Reply
  29. HornyPopcorn ! said:

    I watched this talk many times, everytime I watch it, I understand something new.

    July 10, 2019
    Reply
  30. firefoxhits said:

    TED is a forum for ideas. Everyone on TED speaks their truth, but not necessarily the truth.

    July 10, 2019
    Reply
  31. Troll Hidden Cave said:

    cool TALK but as a man who works out doors wearing loose fitting clothes that cover ur skin is the best way to dress to prevent skin cancer and
    reduce chance of heat stroke if Burkas were white or tan they would be ideal wear for a desert.

    July 10, 2019
    Reply
  32. Andrea Basso said:

    1) Declarea "ought" can be derived from "is".
    2) Immediately assumes that morality rests in the fact of suffering-avoidance, an assumption for which there is no empirical evidence.

    July 10, 2019
    Reply
  33. Marc Padilla said:

    Where in the world does rape rate an honor killing. Is there some kind of paternal consent being the standard over the daughters body and her decision to have relations ;and if she does defy her father's authority on the matter of sexual relations ,does that mean she was raped. If the priority is family honor and cultural integrity then threats to the contrary are constant i.e. the real possibility that the culture will collapse completely.

    July 10, 2019
    Reply
  34. Dop3matt3r _ said:

    Lol the ending , that guy was lowkey outraged on what he heard😂

    July 11, 2019
    Reply
  35. denzali said:

    Would we ask a super Computer if we should have a child? We already use computers to direct most of our lives so I’d say yeah tbh

    July 12, 2019
    Reply
  36. Ricky & Peggy-Sue Jones said:

    Oh Sam. Thanks very much for being Sam.

    July 12, 2019
    Reply
  37. Truth Seeker said:

    This guy really knows how to deceive his audience. Verily Rasul saww alluded to the fact that some speech can have the effects as sehr (crudely magic) . The deception is real when his argument is constructed on the basis of lies.
    To link honour killings to a particular religion shows his ignorance.

    July 12, 2019
    Reply
  38. Sean Kelly said:

    Yeah, no it can't. Not even going to stay and watch this crap cause I know the drill. TED talks are terrible propaganda

    July 13, 2019
    Reply
  39. gearhead 130 said:

    I'm not convinced that spanking children is such a bad thing. It's true that many people spank their children incorrectly and they are basically assaulting them. You should never be angry nor should you ever WANT to spank them. It's done out of necessity for the child. I've seen how effective it can be when used correctly, and how DETRIMENTAL it can be when done incorrectly. You could assign as many punishments to a child as you like but they don't have to follow though unless there is some ultimate punishment they will receive for not doing so. "Go to time out" – NO! "Go to your room" NO! See what I mean? It's not a coincidence that the children that have no discipline act naughty and aren't as successful.

    July 13, 2019
    Reply
  40. Fred Midtgaard said:

    This is very, very American! My first thought is that he is unaware of Greek philosophy. The second is that he seems unaware of his own culture. There is a joke in Europe: What do you call someone who speaks many languages? Multilingual. What do you call someone who speaks two languages? Bilingual. What do you call someone who speaks one language? American! It doesn't really point to languages as such but points to the total lack of understanding of even the existence of other cultures! They are just plain wrong in the American view. That's a characteristic of a culture in decline. The Greeks, The Romans, The Brittish, and now The Americans. And it is creating a divide between Europe and the USA. I am not an English speaker but I speak more than eight languages. This gives insight into cultures that are vastly different. Not having cultural experience is riding the American society as a nightmare. Whites play Egyptians, Africans (with makeup), Chinese and so forth in Hollywood movies because you don't think people from other races or cultures can do the job. Despicable!

    July 13, 2019
    Reply
  41. Raw Engineer said:

    Another so-called atheist trying to impose his stupid rules on me. I'm a proper atheist. There are no rules. I don't want any rules. I don't care what happens to humanity after I die.

    July 13, 2019
    Reply
  42. Cartoon Love said:

    religion says we know it is wrong to kill human beings because God says so, that foundation of "God says so" is the premise behind all religious morality. Sam says God doesnt exist and religion is not needed to explain morality…then he says we know that human suffering is wrong, and im like, im sorry What!? how do we know that human suffering is wrong

    you just cant say we know that human suffering is wrong…you have to rationally and logically explain why and how we know that human suffering is wrong. you have to show your work. You can't just assume it's objective fact that human suffering is wrong. Its like he takes God out of the equation then smuggles God back in and says we just know that human suffering is wrong…well how do we know for sure objectively factually logically speaking that human suffering is wrong and keep in mind that for that statement to be the foundation of an argument in favor of science based morality it has to be absolute. which means in every possible conceivable context human suffering is always absolutely wrong.

    This is the fundamental flaw in Sam Harris argument for science based morality.

    July 14, 2019
    Reply
  43. Roger Roger said:

    You have to laugh at many of the comments here. The man has a PHD in neuroscience and many of these people in the comments must surely posses an equivalent or superior degree or knowledge because they make a lot of claims that Sam doesn't know or understand what he is talking about. lmfao. I would love to see any of them sit down with Sam in a one on one to discuss where exactly he is mistaken and explain to him exactly why. Just like all the other "experts" we have these days, especially in politics, who think they know more than scientists who have spend their entire careers studying their individual fields of expertise.

    July 15, 2019
    Reply
  44. Robert Binner Mattfeldt said:

    11:30 Judeo-Christian-Islam is a foul, and dangerous religion. It is based on tribal pagan lore, and it has absolutely no monopoly on morality!

    July 15, 2019
    Reply
  45. Fanny Anzai said:

    It is Objectivism. Sam olny missed the proper name.

    July 15, 2019
    Reply
  46. Nicolas A. Garcia said:

    14:44 Like if you recognize Adrian Paenza at this frame XD

    July 15, 2019
    Reply
  47. MrPorkncheese said:

    Sam is talking about personal morals but the thing with personal morals is that it is subjective.
    Eg; a man is sent to prison for 1 year for a crime that he didn't commit. Throughout that year the level of resentment grows large. When he's released he goes and murders the judge who wrongfully sent him to jail. In his mind he is justified. This is where one should use the morals of his religion to stop from acting out this sin of aggression.
    Then there is societal morals. Should we allow homosexuality? Should we teach it to young kids? Should we allow beastiality? Should we allow abortion? There are people on both sides of the fence, some say yes others say no. Well then who is right? Again the choice of people depends greatly on their subjective experiences whereas these laws should be based on sustaining society. Where will society end up if most people practiced homosexuality? There will be even less child births and there will be an epidemic of STDs. Eventually that society will be taken over

    July 17, 2019
    Reply
  48. David Letwin said:

    17:00 says it takes people to admit that, without any overarching structure, they define their morality absolutely and enact it perfectly. Therefore science can answer moral questions? Ppfft. All you gave was proof that science can help provide us with solutions to problems. No moral or ethical justification or maxims. Nothing just trust in science they arent like ISIS… I enjoyed the talk but the intellectual aspect of empiricism dealing with pre empirical questions is rightly nonsense. Use science like we did to asylum patients? You dont ever acknowledge the separation of empiricism and ethics that has existed in ethical debates since the British empiricists.

    July 17, 2019
    Reply
  49. Ashton Gardner said:

    'The Divine nature and eternal power of the Creator are seen through what has been made, easily observable through the natural senses as well as formal science and biology'. Pauls letter to the Romans.

    July 18, 2019
    Reply
  50. hwd71 said:

    There is a difference between
    Tssues and Issues.
    Syndromes and
    Sins.

    July 19, 2019
    Reply
  51. hwd71 said:

    The Science of embryology can tell you the unborn are whole, living and distinct human beings, but can't tell you that murdering them is wrong.

    https://www.princeton.edu/~prolife/articles/embryoquotes.html

    July 19, 2019
    Reply
  52. Jim Willis said:

    Thanks for having captions for the Deaf – found you via Ravi Zacharias – RZIM

    July 19, 2019
    Reply
  53. Lord Goose said:

    You take moral truths to be self evident, but anyone can easily scientifically argue that we should put cholera in the water for any number of logical and rational reasons, if they hold different values that you.

    The fact of values doesn’t answer where the value comes from, it just acknowledges that value exists.

    (P.s.) i know he wont read any of this. Just thinking it through.

    July 20, 2019
    Reply
  54. Terry Thompson said:

    There will be no progress until a medical cure for psychopathy is generated. Also, there will be no total resolution until ALL people realize we have to stop competing and collaborate.

    July 21, 2019
    Reply
  55. Isaac Long said:

    The guy at the end asked some interesting questions but also displayed some very under minding and disrespectful behavior through body language and the framing in which he asked his questions. Politically he may have had to seem that way due to the mentioning of the Middle East. Sam gave excellent responses and tried not to leave too much of anything up for interpretation through out the entire talk. In conclusion this was an excellent mind expanding talk that would benefit anyone truly searching for truth with the slight addition of a rude person at the very end.

    July 22, 2019
    Reply
  56. Incognito said:

    2200 idiots living in cloth bags disliked this video.

    July 22, 2019
    Reply
  57. Erwin Rexel Anacleto said:

    The idea of moral relativism is what measures our diversity of opinions through different cultural landscapes and we were fragmented because of this which questions or contradicts the universal/absolute conception of Morality

    July 24, 2019
    Reply
  58. Christine Wood said:

    We CANNOT overcome religious dogma and extremism without dismantling patriarchy.

    July 24, 2019
    Reply
  59. Ravi Bhujun said:

    Chris Anderson is a businessman not a deep thinker. He uses his position as Ted creator to try to discredit Sam in his way at the end. I listened to his podcast with Sam and it's just a pity to hear him trying to play the intellectual one!

    July 25, 2019
    Reply
  60. Anime Oz said:

    What a fucking moron XD

    July 25, 2019
    Reply
  61. Daniel Chettiar said:

    Title: Science can answer moral questions
    So where was the answer in the video?

    July 27, 2019
    Reply
  62. Noah Slade-Joseph said:

    I appreciate the sentiment behind the video, but that is one extremely oversimplified idea of ethics and morality. I wouldn’t necessarily be opposed to these ideas or even comment about it if they weren’t dangerous, but they are. Combining a blatant dismissal of complexity with a doctrine that demoralizes the idea of tolerance and creates a ranking amongst worldview (all while having no distinct reasoning or logic aside from a few circumstantial analogies) is a recipe for bigotry and social division. There’s so many things left unaddressed or dismissed in this video about the nature of mankind that about 30 minutes on Crash Course Philosophy could more effectively address. I like the sentiment and I agree that we need to find some sort of basis for morality that we can all share if we’re going to help society function as a whole- but not by being simpleminded like that.

    July 31, 2019
    Reply
  63. Slavic Soldier said:

    I feel like he made some good points but at the same time said a lot of easily refutable points as well. There are a lot of holes in his speech for sure.

    July 31, 2019
    Reply
  64. Martin Hindenes said:

    Thank you. I can now reference this video when people disagree with me that there exist objective moral truths. Extrapolating further, there must be objective good and evil. That's a strong pointer in favor of a religious worldview being close to the objective reality in which we live.

    July 31, 2019
    Reply
  65. Eli Terrell said:

    He may be right but his definition of corporal punishment is way off, raising large bruises and breaking skin on a child is not legal anywhere in America. Spanking like with a wooden spoon or a switch and pinching are legal however

    August 1, 2019
    Reply
  66. Jarom Hall said:

    Let me sum this up for you. Thanos was right.

    August 2, 2019
    Reply
  67. Jarom Hall said:

    The fact that Sam thinks that life expectancy in Classical Greece was 30 is extremely disappointing considering how high a pedestal many put him on.

    August 2, 2019
    Reply
  68. justice4all said:

    The more we share or expose Sam to people, they will awaken. He is one of the best orators ever!

    August 3, 2019
    Reply
  69. Ben Sommer said:

    Dripping with presumptions: “fellow primates”, “minds are just brains”

    August 4, 2019
    Reply
  70. Արման said:

    Only uneducated people who do not understand the scientific method can say that science can not answer moral questions.
    Morals are the concept of right and wrong, and although right and wrong is subjective for each person, we certainly know that there is a one and only solution that will be beneficial and hence right for the majority. That is how our whole civilization is constructed, for the benefit of the majority. If that is the case, than all we have to do is find the objective right and wrong answers for the majority.

    And now answer me what tool do humans use to find an objective truth? "knowledge about or study of the natural world based on facts learned through experiments and observation" is definition of science, in other words the objective description of reality.

    In the example of womens rights that he talked about, those practices are directly detrimental to the majority in their population, both to women and the men that love them (fathers, brothers) etc, hence that practice is objectively wrong.

    August 5, 2019
    Reply
  71. Chua Wu said:

    He's calling for more common sense instead of science

    August 5, 2019
    Reply
  72. Chemwi369 said:

    It seems like what Harris has done here is to define utilitarianism again. One of the great critiques of utilitarianism has been that utility (a synonym for flourishing) is difficult to calculate and so as a practical system of ethics it is difficult to implement. With brain imaging it may become easier, but we have to remember that what looks like healthy behavior is harder to define than Harris seems to believe. Should we just maximize enjoyment? Should we maximize productivity? What exactly does human flourishing mean? Harris has a sort of hand-wavey argument here that conceals the fact that he’s just pushing value judgements into the ill-defined sphere of “human flourishing.”

    August 5, 2019
    Reply
  73. John Nowakowski said:

    I don't remember in all this him ever defining what morality is and why it is what it is, or why we should accept why it is what it is other than science deals with facts…

    August 5, 2019
    Reply
  74. Greg Bond said:

    Blah blah blah. Unnecessary words.
    It’s very simple. Below are actual beliefs past and present.

    —invisible Gods —talking snakes —talking
    bushes that are on fire —gods with 4 arms and the face of an elephant—People coming back to life —people dying and turning into dust but reincarnated as a bird or a water buffalo or a duck—global flood killing millions of children and babies— a man surviving 3 days inside a whale that swallows him —a monkey face god who helps you maintain celibacy—
    a god who controls the wind speed an air temperature—a woman turning into a block of pure salt—a woman who controls all the waters of the world— a half horse half man creature—a seven headed beast who comes out of the sea with crowns on its head,
    actual dragons flying around breathing fire—god who lives in the sun , a man flying through the heavens pulled by powerful flying goats while shooting lighting down on his enemies.
    I’m tired now sorry.

    August 6, 2019
    Reply
  75. Jun Jon said:

    You are ignorant of the biblical version of morality …

    August 7, 2019
    Reply
  76. William H said:

    Disagree with the premise . Values aren't a type of fact.

    August 8, 2019
    Reply
  77. United Drone said:

    This guy needs to do a lot more research. It's definitely illegal to punish any student with pain in any way. This includes paddling. If he can't get that right he's probably missing a lot more. He's trying to win the audience with fake news and it's working. Don't believe anything you hear.

    August 9, 2019
    Reply
  78. Sankha Subhra Bakshi said:

    Do Sam Harris know Jonathan Haidt?

    August 10, 2019
    Reply
  79. syed amer said:

    Islam nowhere teaches honor killings. you can't label the acts of a particular group of people to their ideologies.
    just like if we have more gamers in Korea doesn't mean the Korean government made a law for its citizen to be a gamer from age 15 – 30.
    The best thing about you is, you did misrepresentation of Islam very well

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  80. Armands Liniņš said:

    I feel like he only gives the direction for general morality, and I'm afraid many parts of the world have already mostly adopted that. His metaphor for food/poison is not really working, though, since some foods can be worse for you (or a bit more 'poisonous') than others while remaining more or less healthy. There is a continuum of healthiness, and that's where a lot of debate and clash comes in, since we don't actually know what's healthier or equally healthy, or more moral, to bring it back. At least in the long term.

    August 15, 2019
    Reply
  81. Mohamed Ahmed said:

    Dude is a Fuckup Using Generalization in it's worst form to spread hate that's what's immoral .

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  82. A T said:

    I am an immigrant from a culture that doesn't oppose reasonable disciplinary action such as spanking a child, this is to teach the child the concept of boundary, the idea of right and wrong, the idea of consequences of one's own action, I don't advocate the physical aspect of this, however, I myself see plenty of sorry grow-ups without disciplinary actions in their upbringings, we must morally define what is reasonable disciplinary action raising our children for our own & their sake.

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  83. noego jimmy said:

    Intelligent and logical man. Shame he generalizes Muslims(that is his daily thing) cause that undermines him. He could had easily used any example for his logic, yet threw all of his speech he (mostly and in peak places with even slight touch of drama) chose to use examples of poor peasant radical Muslims to point what is wrong, evil, dark, obscure…
    I am free minded, logical person (at least I hope so) and to me radical Islam is not even among first 20 examples of wrong doing in the world…
    Lecture with beautiful logic and the ugliest agenda.

    August 18, 2019
    Reply
  84. Matthew Tenney said:

    His idea is that the emotions of empathy, sympathy and compassion are the true bedrock of morality. The problem with that is that feelings have no authority over us. Who has a moral obligation to obey a feeling? In fact, it's usually best to suppress feelings. For example, it's usually best to suppress panic, resentment, and rage. You should suppress your empathy also. So once you suppress your feelings in order to make a clear-headed decision, Harris's entire foundation for making the decision is gone.

    This lecture is so arrogant. For thousands of years philosophers and everyone else has known that science does not say whether something is right or wrong. Oh but none of those ancients knew about empathy which was only recently discovered by Sam Harris as the true foundation of moral action.

    August 18, 2019
    Reply
  85. Fringe Fringe said:

    Values (in general meaning) are not well-being… He just took utilitarianism (a specific set of values) and tried to convince people that its obvious its the only possible set that exists… Its not… This is rather nasty eristics.

    August 24, 2019
    Reply
  86. zongora123 said:

    This is very frightening…. AI is ment to answer moral questions ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsZ90xJHrqw

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  87. andrea piro said:

    Start to fight the white knights, the social justice warrior, and when you've exterminated them.. MAYBE there will be a light at the end of the tunnel… But untill they are free to talk and to say things, this world will be lead by non sensical discussion and "don't hurt my feelings" .

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  88. Rusty Shackleford said:

    This makes sense in a practical sense, but it's just bad philosophy.

    August 26, 2019
    Reply
  89. A Zambrano said:

    I do not think an atheist has an argument when it comes to morality, as they are thing in this world that cannot be understood, for instance, a cuckoo bird, the minute its born it knows it has to kill every other egg and if you watch how clever or cruel the cuckoo bird carries out that task you become amazed at the way it does it, the same with a caterpillar, for its life it eats leafs small insects until its strong enough to build a cacoon then it seals itself in until its starving and tries hard to break out it struggles real hard and if you try to help it it will fall down and die if you leave it to struggle it will turn into a butterfly,
    they are many examples in nature deep in the oceans or amazons that will make you come to the only conclusion GOD, an atheist thinks its all a massive accident,

    August 27, 2019
    Reply
  90. Geçmişim ve Ben said:

    Bu adama sadece "yazık" diyebilirim.

    August 29, 2019
    Reply
  91. Sheik Emuranah Abubakar Feika said:

    He talked about people being totally free to interpret their form of morality, is anyone allowed to join the program naked??? There are people that find it pleasing to be totally naked.

    August 30, 2019
    Reply
  92. Jesus Garcia said:

    Why People Mention Hitler On Morality? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nkNlTe6OA8

    September 1, 2019
    Reply
  93. Riccardo Raccis said:

    "I want an objective, quantifiable morality; which can have different outcomes; and exceptions. Whatever, just accept what I say and remake society the way I want."

    September 2, 2019
    Reply
  94. Hannah Smith said:

    He talks a lot about suffering, human consciousness, and well being – these are central topics in Buddhism – a religion, which can be characterised more as a philosophy – that emerged in the 6th century – these ideas are not new – we've had other humans before Sam think, speak and teach about this, and it's not just in Buddhism, other religions and philosophies also address these issues – as humans we've been pondering these questions FOR A LONG TIME – modern day science I think begins in the 19th century. It's just that there is a wealth of human culture and history – worldwide – often in the forms of stories, folk talks, traditional stories, religious stories, philosophy, culture, and now even modern day stories and literature – that think and discuss morality. WHY WOULD YOU NOT draw on this cultural and historical wealth of human thought? It's not a matter of separating science and morality, it's about recognising that humans have a diverse capacity for science, philosophy, the arts, anthropology, history, psychology etc etc. etc. Not only are we interested in finding out what everything is and how everything works in the universe – we also want to know how we can best live in it, and use the time and our skills while we are here. It's like you have a whole tool box to describe, see, experience, think and discuss the world and our experience of it and all you want to use out of the toolbox full of different tools is a hammer, or just the screw driver, to answer everything. WWWHHHHYYYYYY??? Also he didn't really answer the question, he makes some interesting points, but doesn't really attempt a strong answer.

    September 2, 2019
    Reply
  95. Gregory Mandara said:

    There are aspects of the personality that transcend the modus operandi of neurons firing. There is more to life than "on off on off on off." The brain is, simply put; a tool. It has more to do with confusing consciousness, than creating it.

    September 5, 2019
    Reply
  96. Hideo Kojima said:

    Ben stiller is kinda an asshat. This was only slightly more enjoyable than zoolander.

    September 6, 2019
    Reply
  97. hokiturmix said:

    exploding intro outromusic is FUCKING ANNOYING!

    September 6, 2019
    Reply
  98. Joy Bradford said:

    Sam. You can listen to all the noise about all that you say. Disregard that bullshit! You nailed it on this one brother!

    September 7, 2019
    Reply
  99. J R said:

    There is a different between good and bad, right and wrong.

    Human suffering is bad but does not make it wrong.

    September 9, 2019
    Reply
  100. Ace Fighter said:

    wow, its interesting the support he gets from atheists when there are so many holes in his arguments. The deeper he digs, the more questions arise. Trying to create a concept from a broken foundation is just that, broken.

    September 11, 2019
    Reply

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