RSA ANIMATE: Changing Education Paradigms



every country on Earth at the moment is reforming public education there are two reasons for it the first of them is economic people are trying to work out how do we educate our children to take their place in the economies of the 21st century how do we do that even that we can't anticipate what the economy will look like at the end of next week as the recent turmoil is demonstrated how do we do that the second though is cultural every country on Earth on Earth is trying to figure out how do we educate our children so they have a sense of cultural identity and so that we can pass on the cultural genes of our communities while being part of the process of globalization have we square that circle the problem is they're trying to meet the future by doing what they did in the past and on the way there alienating millions of kids who don't see any purpose in going to school when we went to school we were camped there with a story which is have you worked hard and did well and got a college degree you would have a job our kids don't believe that and they're right not to by the way you're better having a degree than not but it's not a guarantee anymore and particularly not if the route to it margin eise's most the things that you think are important about yourself and some people say we have to raise standards if this is a breakthrough you know but really yes I we should why would you lower them you know I haven't come across an argument that persuades me of lowering them but raising them of course we should raise them the problem is that the current system education was designed and conceived and structured for a different age it was conceived in the intellectual culture of the Enlightenment and in the economic circumstances of the Industrial Revolution before the middle of the nineteenth century there were no systems of public education not really I mean if you get educated my Jesuits you know if if you had the money but public education paid for from taxation compulsory to everybody and free at the point of delivery that was a revolutionary idea and many people objected to it they said it's not possible for many Street kids working class children to benefit from public education they're incapable of learning to read and write and why are we spending time on this so there's also built into the whole series of assumptions about social structure and capacity it was driven by an economic imperative of the time but running right through it was an intellectual model of the mind which was essentially the Enlightenment view of intelligence that real intelligence consists in the capacity for a certain type of deductive reasoning and the knowledge of the classics originally what we come to think of as academic ability and this is deep in the gene pool of public education of the really two types of people academic and non-academic smart people are non smart people and the consequence of that is that many brilliant people think they're not because they're being judged against this particular view of the mind so we have a twin pillars economic and intellectual and my view is that this model has caused chaos in many people's lives it's being great for some there have been people have benefited wonderfully from it but most people have not instead they suffer this this is the modern epidemic and it's as misplaced it's as fictitious this is the plague of ADHD now this is a map of the instance of ADHD in America or prescriptions for ADHD don't mistake me I don't mean to say there is no such thing as attention deficit disorder I'm not qualified to say if there is such a thing I know that a great majority of psychologists and children pediatrician think there is such a thing but it's still a matter of debate what I do know for a fact is it's not an epidemic these kids are being medicated as routinely as we had our tonsils taken out and on the same whimsical basis and for the same reason medical fashion our children are living in the most intensely stimulating period in the history of the earth they're being this with information and course there attention from every platform computers from iPhones from advertising hoardings from hundreds of television channels and were penalizing them though for getting distracted from what no boring stuff at school for the most part it seems to me it's not a coincidence totally that the instance of ADHD has written in parallel with the growth of standardized testing now these kids are being given ritalin and adderal and all manner of things often quite dangerous drugs to get them focused and calm them down but according to this attention deficit order increases as you travel east across the country people start losing interest in Oklahoma they can hardly think straight in Arkansas and by the time we get to washing they've lost it completely and there are separate reasons for that I believe it's a fictitious epidemic if you think of it the arts and I don't say this exclusively the arts I think it's also true science and of maths for the lemming I said that particular because they are the victims of this mentality currently particularly the arts especially address the idea of aesthetic experience an aesthetic experience is one in which your senses are operating at their peak when you're present in the current moment when you're resonating with the excitement of this thing that you're experiencing when you are fully alive an anaesthetic is when you shut your senses off and deaden yourself to what's happening and a lot of these drugs are that we're getting our children to education by illicit icing them and I think we should be doing the exact opposite we shouldn't be putting them asleep we should be waking them up to what they have inside of themselves but the model we have is this it's I believe we have a system education that is modeled on the interests of industrialism and in the image of it I'll give you a couple of examples schools are still pretty much organized on factory lines ringing bells separate facilities specialized in two separate subjects we still educate children by batches you know we put them through the system by age group why do we do that you know why is there this assumption that the most important thing kids have in common is how old they are you know it's like the most important about them is their date of manufacture I mean well I know kids who are much better than other kids are the same age in different disciplines you know or at different times of the day or better in smaller groups and in large groups or sometimes they want to be on their own if you're interested in model of learning you don't start from this production line mentality these are it's essentially about conformity in increasing it's about that as you look at the growth of standardized testing and standardized curricula and it's about standardization I believe we've got to go in the exact opposite direction that's what I mean about changing the paradigm there is a great study done recently of divergent thinking published couple of years so divergent thinking isn't the same thing as creativity i define creative there's the the process of having original ideas that have value divergent thinking isn't a synonym but it's a an essential capacity for creativity it's the ability to see lots of possible answers to a question lots of possible ways of interpreting a question to think what Edward de Bono's probably call laterally to think not just in linear or convergent ways to see multiple answers not one so I mean there's test for this I mean one kind of code example would be people might be asked to say how many uses can you think I'll for a paper clip while those routine questions most people might come with 10 or 15 people are good at this might come with 200 and they do that by saying well put the paper clip be 200 foot tall be made out of foam rubber you know like does it have to be a paper clip as we know it Jim you know now the test of this they gave them to 1,500 people of soup in a book called break point and beyond and on the protocol of the test if you scored above a certain level you'd be considered to be a genius at divergent thinking ok so my question to you is what percentage of the people tested of the 1500 scored at genius level for divergent thinking now you need to know one more thing about them these were in the Garten children so what you think what percentage of genius level 80 make 18 okay 98 percent now the thing about this was it was a long to two dnal study so they retested the same children 5 years later age of 8 to 10 what you think 50 they retested visit them again five years later ages 13 to 15 you can see a trend here come now this tells an interesting story because you could have imagined it going the other way opinion you start off not being very good but you get better as you get older but this shows two things one is we all have this capacity and two it mostly deteriorates now a lot of things have happened to these kids as they've grown up a lot but one of the most important things and I'm convinced is that by now they've become educated they know they spent 10 years at school being told there's one answer it's at the back and don't look and don't copy because that's cheating in outside schools that's called collaboration you know but in settles now this isn't because teachers want it this way it's just because it happens that way it's because it's in the gene pool of Education we have to think definitely about human capacity we have to get over this old conception of academic non-academic abstract theoretical vocational and see it for what it is a myth secondly we have to recognize that most great learning happens in groups that collaboration is the stuff of growth if we atomized people and separate them and judge them separately we form a kind of disjunction between them and their natural learning environment and thirdly its crucially about the culture of our institutions the habits of the institution and the habitats that they occupy you

42 Comments

  1. Sarah Terhune said:

    there are absolutely no sources given??? Where is he getting any of his information from???

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  2. Connor Stanley said:

    good god please get a better recording device my ears are going to start bleeding

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  3. wavecloudproductions said:

    School = child abuse

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  4. Blue Bolt said:

    Interesting

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  5. James Paterson said:

    There are many good things taught in many schools (notwithstanding the paradigms they were conceived in) but I agree that fundamentally there are flaws in what we are currently doing with education (some major and some quite subtle) .. And the result is that this paradigm is helping to neutralise / dumb down millions and kill creativity and innovation when – as is explained in the video – we need to waken young people up (and many adults also) to what we are doing to the world and how to think constructively and collaboratively how we might address these challenges.
    If you accept the arguments made in the video (mostly about education) it also becomes clear that we need to be more thoughtful about the power of mainstream media (and the quality of journalism), how we use social media, and the time people spend on gaming, and be more aware of the culture of most workplaces.. There is good to be found in all of these, but there are many ways in which these platforms playing a role in distracting people from the negatives of what is actually going on right now… 
    This sort of systemic thinking – and also an acceptance of paradox and diversity in the world – is what we need much more of.. 
    We need to see the very good in what's being done in the world and at the same time the very bad – because by doing this we will get better problem solving on a multi-disciplinary basis, not just in silos and also by trying out new ways of being.. 
    I think we do need to radically overhaul many of our current systems and processes but I think we need to be careful that we don't automatically assume that change can only be resolved by a revolution, which could frighten many, polarise society and create more resistance / divides at a time we should be doing exactly the opposite! ..

    June 30, 2019
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  6. JoeyN said:

    I disagree. The reason one goes to school is to avoid having to fix sinks and toilets with blue-collar jobs

    June 30, 2019
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  7. K_ Mpatzi said:

    10yrs later almost, still no changes welpwlepsppspapsjbs

    June 30, 2019
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  8. Afflictamine said:

    i wish i saw this in 2010. that was the year they tricked me into thinking i had to go to university

    June 30, 2019
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  9. Natalia Crosdale said:

    Sudsbury schools as an alternative maybe?

    A Sudbury school is a type of school, usually for the K-12 age range, where students have complete responsibility for their own education, and the school is run by a direct democracy in which students and staff are almost equals.

    June 30, 2019
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  10. Bill Bell said:

    Try getting any agreement to this from teachers in the public unions in Ontario, Canada.

    June 30, 2019
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  11. Francis Sawyer said:

    I think he glosses quickly over some concepts that are far more complex than he gives credit. He's biting off a bit too much IMO.

    June 30, 2019
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  12. Threelly AI said:

    Old town roads is full of weird comments…
    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/threelly-ai-for-youtube/dfohlnjmjiipcppekkbhbabjbnikkibo

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  13. Julia Amosa said:

    Thank you for the gift of wisdom and Sharing this information. So valuable.

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  14. Leung Joyce said:

    Ioving the illustration!

    June 30, 2019
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  15. aalever said:

    In Europe, the assessment for ADHD is much stricter than in the US. The patient has to have exhibited particular symptoms in a range of circumstances their whole life, as well as having all other possible causes (including boredom) eliminated. I wonder if the reason the US won't up their game to European Standards is related to the capitalistic nature of their health service, which profits from the provision of treatments irrespective of their efficacy.

    June 30, 2019
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  16. Troy Gardner said:

    @8:52 a link to the study/ book "breakpoints and beyond" is here https://www.google.com/search?client=ms-android-mpcs-us-revc&biw=360&bih=560&ei=vUi5XIOxJNqv0PEP75mhiA4&q=breakpoint+and+beyond&gs_ssp=eJzj4tFP1zc0SspNtzTNKTJgBAAe5QPy&oq=breakpoint+and&gs_l=mobile-gws-wiz-serp.1.0.46i275j0l7.11163.19355..22964…3.0..2.324.3965.0j22j2j2….2..0….1…….8..0i71j35i39j0i22i30j46i39j46i67j46i273j0i67j46i131i67j46i131i273j0i273j46i131j0i131j0i10j0i20i263j46.NbcxIFD0zt4

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  17. Builder said:

    I been diagnosed with ADHD and I can say it's bullshit. 2 min evaluation and boom eat these drugs kid.

    June 30, 2019
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  18. rabbagast said:

    which talk or talks is this based on?

    June 30, 2019
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  19. abidjan1981 said:

    WOW! Just WOWThis made me see education in a new light. Everything in this video is true.

    June 30, 2019
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  20. Horstianator said:

    Noch wer Fachdidaktik II? xD

    June 30, 2019
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  21. Tone _ said:

    Im watching this in school rn lmao

    June 30, 2019
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  22. A. Nestor said:

    When all people all over the world will be "properly" educated, there will be no reason to have wars, politicians and stock exchanges.

    June 30, 2019
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  23. Ami Moore said:

    7:45

    June 30, 2019
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  24. P J M said:

    Everyone in the comment section was saying how good it is and how much this video has helped them but here I am trying to figure out how on earth am I supposed to do a mind map for this video

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  25. Michael Morrison said:

    The conclusion of this presentation was as I anticipated: group thinking and a divergence away from capitalism are what is best for the educational purposes of sustainability and the mental health of our youth. However, as a current student in Arizona learning about critical thinking and bias, the obvious anti-Semitic undertones at the 2:10 mark and the belittling of entire States and their populations at the 5-min mark are nefarious ways to support an academic hypothesis. I found the audience's reaction to the presenter's attempt at humor to be troubling. As an individualist, generalizing the negative perception of Oklahoma and Arkansas for the sake of levity is remarkably questionable at best and ineffective to the lucid, critical thinker. The presenter's bias is distracting.

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  26. UBC MET said:

    Fascinating talk with valuable ideas that are needed to create a shift and change in education.

    Makes me think of the TEDxWarsaw Talk one of our grad students gave on Permission to be the Other: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-LkNjQyHww essentially stepping outside the mould of what is expected of you, and allowing yourself the freedom to follow your own path and explore your own desires.

    Adding this video to our This Month in EdTech Playlist.

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  27. Ben Q Myburg said:

    Being quite divergent / creative myself, my child has been taught this way since age 5 and the results are astounding BUT be ready to be challenged often. Excellent video !

    June 30, 2019
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  28. Delta Hill said:

    Sadly this is still the case in most institution-based schooling. No wonder so many parents are opting to home school. It's the only way you can personalise learning to suit the child's needs.
    My high school ran under the VMG (Vertical Modular Grouping) system. VMG structures are different from horizontal structures in which students study at year levels, for example, years 8, 9 and 10. In a vertical system, students of any year level are often in the same class. This arises because in VMG there are four levels from which to choose. Students are guided into the level which is appropriate to their ability in a given subject area. While adhering to the Victorian Learning Framework, our classes were based on the student's interests rather than a prescribed content. English, for example. We were given a choice as to what kind of English we would like to study. Literature, Poetry, Science Fiction, Horror etc. And our assignments and assessments were all based around our specific area. It made the learning process so much easier as we were able to absorb and retain information when we were genuinely interested in the subject matter. Within a year level, you were required to earn a certain number of credit points before you were considered ready to move up to the next year level at school. Each successfully completed class earned you a point. There were set classes you needed to earn points in each year, such as Mathematics and English, but we had the space for two electives each half year slot. This allowed us to take part in special interest areas such as Arts, Sports, Human Development, or even additional English or Mathematics classes if they were what we chose. They would equally earn us a credit point which would go towards our final assessment. We were learning with other students at our level, not necessarily our age, and twice a year we were given the opportunity to move up or down levels, depending on our current understanding of the topic. This worked particularly well within Mathematics. While a student may be at a level 3 while studying geometry, they may require classes directed at a level 2 for algebra.
    My school wasn't considered a "specialist" school. Just a regular high school with irregular teaching methods. Our student body consisted of a wide range of abilities and we had a large number of students with additional needs. Everyone was able to take part in this style of curriculum because we weren't expected to be at a certain level by a certain age. You were able to continue to learn at your ability level until YOU were ready to move up. You were still given a unit point for passing the class. Additional supports were in place to help students who needed them, but it was completely up to the student and their family as to whether they would take advantage of these supports, such as literacy and numeracy aides.
    To this day, 20+ years later, very few schools utilise this wonderful system. I would love to see this style of curriculum introduced into more high schools and even spread to early education institutions. It would make the whole school experience so much more appealing and effective for all learners.

    June 30, 2019
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  29. Vanessa Suteja said:

    can someone give me a 150 word summary of the video please

    June 30, 2019
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  30. jenny martin said:

    As a teacher for https://24hwritemyessays.com/ my question Is our higher education system a failed paradigm or just full of awful teachers?

    June 30, 2019
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  31. Alison Vogelaar said:

    This is very interesting information and I love the move to animation but it's pretty amazing how every single person is white (except for the weird caricatures of people from different nations at the beginning). Probably time to think about representation by RSA artists.

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  32. Dakota B. said:

    I have to write an essay now because you made this and I'm not happy.

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  33. Mohan Singh Rawat said:

    Amazing Video. Here are some helpful tip for students to crack the final exams: https://bit.ly/2KP5fQ8

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  34. Mr. Kat said:

    Can somebody please check to see if Washington, Oregon, and Idaho are okay? They seem to have died and become one franken-being, WashIdaGon. Timestamp : 3:44

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  35. Rangkap Selari said:

    Great video, was taking it seriously until I heard the 'fifteen hundred',.. you do know there's a proper term for those numbers? It's called a thousand.. One thousand five hundred, a thousand five hundred, two thousand, three thousand, so when you reach ten thousand you can describe ten thousand, maybe eleven thousand, heck even twenty thousand, a hundred thousand, who knew that there was such amounts…

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  36. Brandon Potts said:

    It is important to incorporate learning into play during a child’s development. https://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/learning-through-play/

    Check out Snapology that uses LEGO blocks to teach STEM concepts to children. https://www.gofundme.com/snapology-of-westchester?pc=ot_co_dashboard_a&rcid=f859a90264424903b4a9531b55ddb549

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  37. Sneaky Snec said:

    I had to put this on 0.75 playback speed ._.

    June 30, 2019
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  38. TulipsAcademy said:

    Just love watching this video. Wish my parents had seen this some 30 years ago

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  39. Shawn ¿ said:

    The revolution and framework for change is in place, now the educators and their policy makers need to recognize and implement the new paradigm.
    A shift cannot happen unless some brave and ambitious thinkers take action against an archaic philosophy.
    Sir Ken Robinson is a genius mind

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  40. Adil khan said:

    again he is speaking Osho. mark my words

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  41. Edwina Thomas said:

    at about the four minute mark he says ADHD is a fictitious epidemic. Really?

    June 30, 2019
    Reply
  42. Noveske said:

    In short: The education system is outdated and doesn't contribute to the development of a person, but rather drags them out into the world, through the same pipe hole as everybody else, even though there was a vast system of special pipelines that could have been explored by that person and that would have been better suited for his personal intellectual development and identity. However, he was forced by an unfair system to use the same path as the mass, which culminates to the person never having any real power over his future self.

    June 30, 2019
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