Portable Air Conditioners – Why you shouldn’t like them


Air conditioners are pretty cool. *awkward pause* But there’s an increasingly
popular variety of them that figuratively and literally sucks. That would be… these bundles of joy. Portable air conditioners seem to be taking
the world by storm, or at least have taken the air conditioner isle of the hardware store
by storm. But are they any good? Do these cold-making machines have what it
takes to usurp the traditional window unit? No. Portable air conditioners are actually kinda… bad. Now it’s not like they don’t work! And some of them aren’t quite as bad as
most. Plus, they can really come in handy. This one here is serving duty precisely because
the window it’s venting through isn’t really suited to holding a window unit in
place with any sense of confidence. And I know because I tried. Yes, this here is the symbol of my shame. The air conditioner that was never meant to
be. But luckily for you I didn’t return it because
it’s gonna be a great visual aid! Now, in this video I’m going to argue that
if you need an air conditioner you should gravitate towards these simple window units
and away from those trendy portable units *if you can*. And to find out why, we need to learn a little
bit about air conditioning. Air conditioners are mechanical devices which
collect and concentrate heat energy in order to move it from one place to another. The cold air they create is in fact ordinary
air that’s had its heat energy sucked right out of it. And of course, we can’t just bottle that
energy up (though that would be super cool if we could figure that out) so instead we
move it somewhere else–usually to outside air. And inside every air conditioner you’ll
find three essential parts that make that happen. This is the basis of nearly every air conditioning
and refrigeration system in service today. The black cylinder contains a compressor which
squeezes a gas called a refrigerant into a small space, decreasing its volume and increasing
the pressure it’s under. The high pressure gas, which has now gotten
quite hot thanks to the fact that it just got compressed, travels through these pipes
into the second key component; the condenser. The condenser is a heat exchanger designed
to cool that hot gas down as quickly as possible. The densely spaced fins increase its surface
area to speed up the heat transfer, and a fan helps to speed it along even more by blowing
air across the fins. Since the refrigerant is now pressurized,
its boiling point has increased. And in fact, its boiling point has increased
so much that once we get it down to something like 130 or 150 degrees, it will condense
into a liquid. So, as the hot gas winds its way through all
these pipes and its heat energy gets transferred to the air, it slowly turns into a liquid,
releasing a ton of heat energy as it does so. Now here’s where the magic happens. That liquid is being held back by a metering
device such as a thermal expansion valve, to keep the pressure high in the condenser
and limit the amount of liquid refrigerant that can pass through. This basic air conditioner uses a capillary
tube, a long copper tube with a very small internal diameter, to restrict the refrigerant
and thus limit its flow. But once it makes it through to the other
side, it finds itself in a second heat exchanger, called the evaporator. This one is functionally identical to the
condenser, except the pressure inside here is much, much lower thanks to the suction
created by the intake side of the compressor. Once inside here, the refrigerant can relax,
and its boiling point suddenly shoots way way down, like into the well-below-zero territory. And that means it’s gonna spontaneously
boil –or evaporate– because, well, it’s too hot for it to remain a liquid. But to change phases back into a gas, it needs
to get energy from somewhere. And luckily, the fins of the evaporator help
it absorb the energy in the room, and the effect is that the room gets colder. In effect the heat energy inside the room
is being used to warm up the refrigerant as it evaporates. Thinking about this can be kinda weird because
we like to think of the evaporator as getting cold, which it is, but it’s getting cold
because it’s pulling heat energy out of the air and into the refrigerant inside of
it. Coldness is really just less concentrated
heat energy, and since heat likes to go towards cold places to spread out, it naturally finds
its way (with the help of a fan). After the refrigerant has absorbed as much
energy as it can, it reenters the compressor where the cycle starts all over again. Once it’s under high pressure, it will be
able to condense into a liquid again, releasing the energy it just absorbed to the outside
air through the condenser. Now, I don’t want to get too far into the
physics of how this works, nor talk about what makes refrigerants special and why they
have been and continue to be a notoriously tricky set of chemicals to manage, so all
I really need you to know for this video is there’s a compressor, a hot side, and a
cold side. If we’re cooling a room, we want the hot
side outside and the cold side inside. Then we can move the heat energy from inside
the room to the outside air, cooling the room. So, let’s take a look at where these components
are when the window unit is in operation. When resting in a window, the bulk of the
machine is actually outside of the space it’s cooling. The compressor and condenser are both outside,
and thanks to the generous amount of styrofoam insulation, we get a pretty good thermal barrier. When cooling, none of the actual air in the
room is moved outside–only the refrigerant, and thus the heat energy it’s absorbed,
makes it out. This maximises efficiency. If you have a central air conditioning system,
you probably have what’s called a split system. Here, the compressor and condenser (along
with a cooling fan) are contained in a single unit which sits outside, and copper refrigerant
lines are run into the building to a separate evaporator located in an air handler or incorporated
in a furnace. See? It’s a split system, as the evaporator and
condenser are split apart. These systems are highly efficient, with the
entire hot side located outside and away from the living space, and only a tiny hole is
required in the home’s thermal barrier to move the refrigerant in and out. Alright, and now let’s take a look at a
portable air conditioner. You may notice that the entire machine is
inside. That means not only is the cold side inside,
the hot side is inside, too. Well. That’s not great. We want the energy being absorbed by the evaporator
and released into the condenser to make its way outside somehow. So, what to portable air conditioners do? They suck in indoor air through these vents,
blow it across the condenser to cool it off, and then push it outside through that hose. That last sentence is very important. They pull in air through these vents, air that they just cooled, mind you, and blow it outside. That sounds pretty friggin stupid, just on
its face. Now, it’s not like it doesn’t work. If these didn’t work they wouldn’t be
nearly as popular as they are. Also! Two-hose portable air conditioners, which
suck in *outside* air to cool the condenser and then blow it back out in two separate
hoses, are available, but they are an increasingly rare part of the portable air conditioner
universe and the vast majority on sale are single-hose units just like this one. So, if this machine relies on drawing air
in through these vent slots to cool the condenser, and then has to barf the now hot air outside,
that means not only is it sacrificing some of the cool air it just generated, it’s
also creating a low pressure environment in whatever space it’s in. Now the air pressure outside room is greater
than the inside. And that means that outside air is going to
make its way in through the walls to replenish the air that just left. You can’t just expel air from a room without
it getting replaced somehow (otherwise you’re in a vacuum chamber and I advise you leave as soon as possible). And what replaces it is ultimately the hot
outside air that you’re fighting against. Genius! And thus we’re at the core of this issue. Single-hose portable air conditioners will
always be significantly less efficient than a window unit because they’re not just pulling
the heat energy out of your room. They’re also pulling the air out, too. In fact, if you go to a hardware store and
take a look at a fresh assortment of portable units, you’ll often find that they have
two cooling capacities listed these days. Why? Well, because newer testing methods are accounting
for the losses brought about by this hose, so while the unit may technically be able
to move 8,000 BTUs per hour, thanks to the warm air it’s drawing back in (as well as
its own cold air it’s blowing back out) it’s effectively only moving 6,000 BTUs
per hour. So, basically it’s 25% less efficient. But it’s actually much worse than that! This little 5,000 BTU window unit consumes
455 watts. If we take a look at this 5,500 BTU portable
unit from LG, you’ll see that it uses over a kilowatt! That’s more than double the input power
required to generate only 10% more cooling. A window unit that consumes that much power
can produce roughly double the cooling capacity. So yeah. Eek. Now I’m not here to say that these are terrible
devices and you’re a fool if you own one. ‘Cause I’d be calling myself a fool twice
if that were the case. But I will say that in general, these should
be your last resort. If you have the option to use a traditional
window unit, take it. It’s much more energy efficient and it will
cost less to run. And yeah, I get it. They’re ugly. They block your view from the window. They’re not exactly attractive from the
outside either. But it’s not just energy efficiency that
they’re better at. Air conditioners are noisy. They’re noisy because they’re mechanical
devices, with a buzzy compressor and two droning fans moving air around. With a traditional window unit, the compressor
and one of the two fans are outside. Thanks to that thermal insulation, you get
a lot of sound insulation, too. You’ll certainly notice a difference when
the compressor is on versus when it’s not, but it’s often pretty subtle. Especially because, as is the case for many
windows units, the same motor drives the indoor blower fan and the condenser fan, so the only
part that cycles on and off is the compressor. [sound of fan running] [sound level increases slightly as compressor kicks in] And of course, split systems are even quieter because the loud parts are nowhere near the
living space. [compressor and fan switch on] Compare that to this thing. Not only is the compressor now inside the
room you’re trying to work or sleep in, but so is the condenser fan. The result is that it’s not that noisy when
it’s only running the circulator fan. But when its thermostat calls for cooling,
it gets way, way louder! Suddenly, the compressor kicks in (which again,
is inside the room) and a second fan turns on to expel the heat from the condenser. It’s a good thing the condenser fan shuts
off when it’s not actively cooling, as otherwise it would suck even more air out the room. But it means there’s a stark difference
in noise levels between not cooling. [a moderately quiet fan noise] And cooling. [compressor kicks in, and a second, much louder
fan spins up at the same time] [it’s really quite dreadful] And if you’re trying to sleep in the same
room as one of these, you’ll have to put up with it going from pretty quiet to loud
as hell and back over and over again. This is a cheap in-house brand unit from that
place where you save big money so I wasn’t expecting it to be whisper quiet, but I’ve
also got a more proper unit from LG that, while a little more elegant in the way it
handles the transition from cooling to not cooling and vice versa, is still much much
louder when it’s cooling. [fan noise] [a second fan spins up] [compressor kicks in] I’m a pretty heavy sleeper, and even for me it can be a challenge to ignore the thing
and fall asleep. And another thing to consider is that while
window units steal a bigger chunk of your windows, they don’t steal your floor space. Portable units aren’t small and they can’t
sit flush against the wall thanks to the hose, so be prepared to re-arrange a little furniture. And by the way. That hose? It gets hot! That heat energy it just concentrated isn’t
gonna go away without a fight, and since this hose isn’t insulated at all, some if it
is coming right back into the room. Fantastic. But, I’ll admit. Portable A/C units are handy. Really handy. They don’t need proper installation like
a window unit does (which is quite a pain, I might add). They can easily be moved from room to room
thanks to the wheels they’re on (that’s why the call them portable). And they fit window types that might otherwise
be unable to accommodate an air conditioner, such as vertical windows or even patio doors. You could even run them through a small dedicated vent, if you choose. But sadly, their single-hose design makes
them, honestly, a terrible device when it comes to efficiency. I’d like to see more double-hose units available
for sale. They’re still gonna have the noise and floorspace
disadvantages, but they at least regain much of their efficiency back. Last year I tried a portable mini-split system,
with a separate outdoor compressor and condenser unit, and an indoor evaporator unit connected
via a flexible refrigerant hose. Sadly, my unit had a refrigerant leak and
stopped working after a few weeks. It looks like that’s a common problem, but
let me tell you it was blissful while it worked. Quiet, efficient, and effective. I’d like to see this product get more development,
but I also understand that it’s got way more limitations than even a window unit. Unless you want to get creative with some
sort of exterior wall bracketing, this is limited to a ground-floor room or a room with
a balcony or something similar. But anyway. If we’re gonna keep using these things,
can we please get more dual-hose units? I get that they’re less flexible, particularly
with vertical or narrow windows, and so are probably less desirable, but hopefully with
more people aware of the energy losses caused by continuously pushing the air out of your
home, we’ll see increased demand. Still, if you’re looking for an air conditioner
in a situation where a window unit could work–you’re seriously better off going with the window
unit. Contrary to what you might think, portable
units are certainly not an upgrade. Other than their portableness. That’s, that’s pretty cool. Thanks for watching, and I hope you found
this video to be as cool as a correctly charged air conditioning system. I do want to explore air conditioning a little
more because I find it fascinating. The way that we exploit the physical properties
of certain gasses to make heat energy move where we want it to go is kinda mind-blowing. Oh, and by the way, not all refrigerants are
crazy complex chemicals. Some small refrigerators and air conditioners
are starting to be charged with propane. Propane, also known as R290, is becoming an
increasingly common refrigerant thanks to its abundance and relative environmental harmlessness. Unfortunately it’s also flammable which
makes servicing these a little tricky, and makes it unsuitable for larger units which
need a lot of refrigerant. But especially for small, cheap units like
these things that are likely to simply be disposed of when they die rather than actually
serviced, it’s a great opportunity to use it. This machine, though, while it is charged
with a flammable refrigerant, uses difluoromethane, or R32. Of course, thanks to everyone who supports
the channel on Patreon, with a special thanks to the fine folks you see scrolling up your
screen. If you’d like to join these people in supporting
the channel, there’s now a new perk! All patrons have access to the patreon-only
Technology Connections Discord server. So, if Discord’s your jam, you can join
these other folks by linking your Discord account to your Patreon account. And as always, early video access, occasional
(very occasional) behind-the-scenes videos, and other patreon-only stuff is available
to you as well. Thanks for your consideration, and I’ll
see you next time! ♫ icy smooth jazz ♫ …the cold air they create is in fact ordinary
air, eh. Eugh, eugh blaugh ugh. I’m–this tone is all wrong. OK… maybe move at like a pace that makes
sense. Yeah, that’s written wrong. Well, that’s fine. And now I will record that line as written! Or at least have taken the hardware isle of
the air condition… the hardware! Arghh… nope. Air conditioners are nois… I should move this again. Coldness is really just less concentrated
heat energy, and sint he… Augh! Sint. Since heat! SINCE heat! It’s a wo…the Since! Since is the word. Since.

100 Comments

  1. briq4 said:

    why exactly do 1.7K people give this a thumbs down? Did they see the title and somehow get completely confused about what the video would be about?

    August 11, 2019
    Reply
  2. Matthew Jackman said:

    Just wanted to remind you these videos are excellent and you've improved so much since I subscribed, keep em coming man

    August 11, 2019
    Reply
  3. Andy Askew said:

    Mini-split is the way to go.

    August 11, 2019
    Reply
  4. D L Johnson said:

    Arctic air units work pretty good as a personal fan. I even used one outside working a parking garage lane.

    August 11, 2019
    Reply
  5. Alan W. said:

    I have owned both the single hose and dual hose air conditioners. Single hose air conditioners will never cool a hot room and are only good for spot cooling (i.e. standing in front of it and using it as a fancy fan). The dual hose units work fantastic but are loud when the compressor cycles on as noted. I increased the efficiency of my dual hose by sealing the case with packing tape around the compressor. I did this because I noticed that the housing around the condenser unit was not completely air tight. You can test for this by running a tissue around the case and seeing if the tissue gets sucked to the cabinet. Works almost as good as a window unit now but more noisy. The cool is worth the noise.

    August 11, 2019
    Reply
  6. Alan W. said:

    Convert any single hose air conditioner to a dual hose air conditioner:

    https://youtu.be/bikp-KDh6Po

    August 11, 2019
    Reply
  7. Alan W. said:

    This is also an option to a portable:

    https://climateright.com/climateright-10-000-btu-portable-air-conditioner-and-dehumidifier-with-heat-pump.html

    August 11, 2019
    Reply
  8. D Wood said:

    I have a 4 year old AeonAire. It has the single hose but keeps my bedroom at 61 at night even when it is still 90 degrees at 1am. Got it at Lowes during a Labor Day Sale for $169. I also like the white noise, sooo Im good.

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  9. Max Jerome said:

    I’m not sure why I watch this video from start to finish as I am not in the market for an A/C but I’m happy I did, I learned something new.

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  10. Keiya said:

    Wouldn't it make more sense to have a single hose unit outside that uses the hose to push cold air *in*? Sort of like a half-assed split?

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  11. shingshongshamalama said:

    Better idea: get proper ventilation throughout your home because you're probably breathing stagnant air.

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  12. Alan W. said:

    Try this, a home made adapter box to use a window air conditioner inside:

    https://youtu.be/URqijywTXOQ

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  13. Mary Joseph said:

    Buy the right product for the job and situation. – I have a portable that I love – it works well for my situation –

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  14. Derpy 1109 said:

    "and it would be super cool if we could"
    What if you just throw a stirling engine on it..?

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  15. spex357 said:

    Energy costs make these a rarity in the UK, plus we rarely have hot periods that last any amount of time.

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  16. terence w said:

    i used thermal insulation sheets to wrap the exhaust hose and other warm parts of the unit. it does help a little.

    August 12, 2019
    Reply
  17. Nicholas Hannah said:

    You just made me very happy I didnt spend the extra hundred bucks on a portable unit

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  18. VladTygr said:

    One apartment I rented forbade the use of window units. My bedroom would be in the upper 90s in the afternoon and if I worked mornings, sleep was impossible. A portable unit was a lifesaver, because nobody knew I had it running. The other drawback was high humidity. I had to run a hose from my portable to a 5 gallon bucket, which filled every day.

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  19. Aretus Smith Jr said:

    Great info, subscribed and liked

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  20. * * said:

    Your Menards references make me nostalgic, lol

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  21. Fred Virtuoso said:

    ignorant air is always being pulled from outside… that's reality, you never live in a sealed bubble. To me these units could work, just have the dual intake and vent hoses attached and it wouldn't be much different than a split system AC unit. If these portable units offer an easier way to insure no refrigerant leaks then they may be a great alternative to the 'refrigerant charge' scam which I just suffered, literally a repairman stealing or venting R22 which caused my previously functioning AC to freeze up and possibly damaged the A coil etc. Long story I had to complain to the BBB and it's unresolved, I want $2000 from them. Having a couple of portable units strategically placed in a home would probably work as long as they had the dual hose. It would be useful to have the intake and vent hose have nozzles you could aim, hot air vent aimed up or to one side, and the intake pulling from downward nozzle or the opposite side. It think that would be enough, or have the dual hoses attached at different windows within the same room.

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  22. Caiden Wichert said:

    10:50 sounds like a friggen jet engine tryna take off

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  23. konisuer said:

    if the room is hot, the AC will exhaust the rooms hot air while providing cold air. Once the room is adequately cooled you no longer need to run the AC therefore no longer venting the now cooled air.

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  24. Jim Varga & Co. said:

    I got one for free from my rents and it works pretty great. General electric 2011.

    August 13, 2019
    Reply
  25. Gen X said:

    Yes, the single hose one's are garbage, just found a dual hose variant that uses the same power as my old single – and it's 25% more efficient 🙂

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  26. Victor Bouché said:

    Why are Americans obsessed with air conditioning ? 🤔

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  27. OMG Ai said:

    Not to mention that a window ac can be low as
    $130
    While the portable ones are like $280 minimum

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  28. MgA said:

    4Words: Buy a Heat Pump.
    TIP Wrap insulation over your exhaust pipe going to the window.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  29. Michael Taylor said:

    Number one reason for me, was NOISE. I returned the portable air conditioner and installed central air.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  30. J Alenichev said:

    Definitely a bitchy bottom.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  31. Dodged a Bullet said:

    Most condo associations, apartment complexes and other home associations don't allow "window A/C units" because they are unsightly, drip water constantly and pose a risk for injury if they fall out from the window. You have to remove them for winter too. Nothing says trailer trash quite like a window A/C!

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  32. Gerry Hernandez said:

    I’d like to thank both you and the Phoenicians.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  33. Johnny Red said:

    I'd like you to do a video on the pros and cons of evaporative coolers.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  34. thisisacrummyname said:

    You are wrong!

    1.Window mounted air conditioners are a doggie door for burglars. They are a good way for a burglar to gain entry to your house. With their larger size they are two heavy to just take in and out of the window as you come and go from your house. That and mounting a window air conditioner, the mount has to be screwed into the house and the window frame so you have to unscrew that to close your window all the way.

    2. Unless a window air conditioner is on a second floor, any thief can just take the air conditioner out of the window and steal it. Now you have lost $130.00 to $400.00 depending on brand and size.

    3. Window air conditioners are not any quieter then portable air conditioners. For me it doesn’t really matter because the white noise helps me sleep.

    4. Since you are comparing apples to oranges 🍎🍊, yes both are air conditioners but your logic on how the portable one works is actually isn’t accurate.

    I have a whole lot more reasons why the portable is better than the window style, I just have better things to do right now.

    The best part of the portable is when winter comes, I just wheel it to the hall closet and it sits next to the vacuum until next year summer. I don’t have to lug that 50lb air conditioner out to the garage, unscrew the stand take it out until next year where I have to reinstall the stand and carry that big ass air conditioner all over again.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  35. Johnny Red said:

    It took a while but after listening to your explanation of how portable ACs work, I see how they SUCK. They literally suck the air out of the room, which brings in hot air from outside.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  36. FireflyJack said:

    So the double hose portable ac units are better than the single hose ones? I used a double hose portable ac unit for two nights and it seemed to work perfectly.

    August 14, 2019
    Reply
  37. SandySez said:

    I had to come back and comment w/ my testimony (and also thank you for the EXCELLENT video!). I came across this just days after my central A/C went out and I temporarily installed one of these, and a small window unit. NOTE: I was able to exhaust it through a pet door, so it was barely 16"-20" from the wall and directly out, not 'up' to a window. I cut a custom hole in the sealed pet door and resealed around THAT, I wrapped the exposed exhaust hose in 3 layers of insulation and sealed it w/ duct tape. THIS THING STILL doubled my power bill! Doubled from a previously running old, inefficient 2 ½ ton dinosaur central A/C! JFC! I repackaged this POS and got a refund. Also … i swear, I would listen to you talk about paint drying, you are addictive.

    August 15, 2019
    Reply
  38. Scott Theis said:

    These definitely have their place. I have one in a server room as a supplement. Of course the bulk of the exit air comes from the office, which is large area and also leaks profusely as notes every time there is a strong windy day. I also installed one in a bedroom where there was no option for a window unit and saves running the central air at night. Any place else is a waste.

    I don't think you mentioned the condensed waste water. The portable units either require a drain or evaporate the water into the exhaust stream, adding to the energy usage and inefficiency.

    August 15, 2019
    Reply
  39. Christopher Stewart said:

    This is an oddly interesting video..

    August 15, 2019
    Reply
  40. Luke Johnson said:

    My family had a two-hose portable AC unit which worked pretty well. I was actually very confused by the proliferation of single-hose units these days. It doesn't make sense to me that single-hose units are so popular when double-hose units were available close to 20 years ago.

    August 15, 2019
    Reply
  41. George Moua said:

    LMAO, you got me with that pun. Noice

    August 15, 2019
    Reply
  42. Jay Marion said:

    Well done video and very informative. I do find fault with your concerns regarding noise. I have had several conventional window AC units in my small studio apartment and have switched to the freestanding portable unit out of necessity. The high rise apartment I live in will fine you $500 if your window ac drips condensation (each occurrence) dripping window units can create slippery mold on sidewalks, a large potential liability for condo associations. Properly setting up the window unit to drain into the house and into the plumbing drainage system was really expensive and not practical. You are right about the efficiency, the portable units cost twice as much to run but in my case there was not much choice. The one benefit is I find them to be much quieter than the previous window units. The condenser fan cycle seems to be much less jarring then the window units. I also noticed that as window units age they start to produce lots of strange noises, creaks, thumps and rattles all of which are far more disturbing to me than the steady white noise produced by fans. My portable is only a couple years old and it too may start getting noisy as it ages but not yet. However, all that being said I liked your very professional presentation, good work!

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  43. Kazeshini said:

    How dare you. How dare you make me learn stuff!!! All jokes aside, thanks for explaining this in a video and thanks to youtube algorithm I guess for showing this to me. Saved me from making a mistake since i was a novice when it came to air conditioners. Lived all my life only using good ol 16 inches fans and during summer where i live the temps can go above 35C quite often, just last year we had a week and a half of temps above 40C straight. But my big gripe with AC is when you have to go outside during heat waves. It's a killer going from cool environment to BANG smoldering heat and when you reach the store BAM back to cold etc etc. I found it makes the heat even worst so i usually avoid AC places, easier to bear.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  44. Cheap business guide Guyana said:

    Lol

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  45. stopglobalswarming said:

    I have one by GE. It’s great, for one room.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  46. stopglobalswarming said:

    110v window units are ok, but mounting is always the problem. Hanging a heavy product on a windowsill is a PITA, and security problem. The portable ac can blow air and water out a dryer hose outlet pipe and a small water hose.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  47. stopglobalswarming said:

    I got a 10,000 btu portable to cool a couple rooms when I get off work from 84F to 79F. It’s fine.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  48. stopglobalswarming said:

    Mine isn’t as loud as my box fan.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  49. Gary Holden said:

    I'm glad I watched this video, I was considering buying a portable unit and had no idea how many drawbacks they have compared to window units. Thanks!

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  50. Voro Kusanagi said:

    I happened to have the opportunity to test out a portable AC unit, and my very first thought was "it pulls from the same area it pushes the room? How is this supposed to work?" Good to know there's supposed to be a hose, or something, involved.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  51. cslloyd1 said:

    You never mentioned what happens to the condensate water in these single hose designs. The chilled water from the evaporator coils is used on the condenser coils to cool the hot refrigerant and is evaporated away through the exhaust hose, thus requiring less exhaust air than otherwise. This solves the issue of drainage (huge issue for installation) and adds the the efficiency since in a split system, the chilled water is discarded down the drain.

    Its obvious that there are energy issues with using interior air for the condenser, but I suspect that for my patio door installation, I lose more to the lack of insulation and air leaks around the plastic insert. Of course, this can be addressed by installing some more insulation (eg foam board or the like) on that insert, which I plan to do soon.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  52. Kevin Jones said:

    I hear ya on the 3 am thing. I get addicted to YouTube constantly.

    This gentleman is very thorough, has a great understanding of whatever subject matter he’s covering, and is very entertaining. Great job on the channel!

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  53. Ken Daniel Murphy said:

    Well this explains a lot. When I was using a portable unit, the entire area on the side of the room with the air conditioner was hot even though it was pushing out really cold air. I did notice the hose, but did not suspect the outside air. Outdoor smells were flooding my room periodically. The outdoor air fighting to fill in the space would likely be why.

    August 16, 2019
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  54. Professor Eggplant said:

    Does heat really like or magically drawn to cold? Or is it more like the Thermodynamics 2nd law where thermal energy always moves toward equilibrium.. I'm going with the actual scientific law instead of the pseudo-science description. Explaining the equilibrium principle is just more accurate and not complex and it doesn't give people a false understanding of science. Be the hero and do what's right.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  55. Professor Eggplant said:

    You should consider the same when you operate the clothes dryer in your house in the summer or the stove. Every little therm of energy will be disbursed into the environment and countered by your air conditioner. Your monitors, computer, refrigerator etc are all generating tons of heat energy that now have to be battled by your air conditioning unit.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  56. Professor Eggplant said:

    You can employ the same principle in your car air conditioning for a quicker response. Put the windows down to disperse the *hot initial inside air then make sure when the windows are up that the system is set to recirculate vs drawing outside air.

    August 16, 2019
    Reply
  57. CMG30 said:

    You are absolutely correct in your overall assessment of the single hose design. That being said, I have found one benefit of the single hose unit. (I have a unit that's even cheaper than the ones you shown us. It's so cheaply built that it only has one giant cylinder fan which blows air into the room and the bottom portion is redirected to exhaust outdoors. The effect is that as long as the fan is turning it's pulling air out of the room.) As I live in a more temperate area of the world, rooms heat up throughout the day but often the outside air is much cooler in the evenings for several hours before things equalize. Now I could just open a window in the evening and wait for a few hours for everything to cool down but by using the portable air conditioner in fan mode, I am able to create a vacuum in the room and pull cooler outside air through the window into the room at a significant rate. I have been able to slash the amount of time it takes to cool the room almost in half from the time it takes from an open window alone. No condenser needed and thus much less electricity used.

    Granted, this this is a very niche case and this minor convenience in no way makes up for the fact that when you really need the air conditioning you're pumping your cooled air outside at a furious rate every time the condenser portion cycles off. That being said, this is a case of how understanding how things work that allows somebody to exploit what's frankly a design flaw for a slight benefit. That's why it's such a good thing that people should understand how things around them work. Even if it's at a basic level. So thanks for your hard work in this regard!

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  58. Wandering Ghost said:

    Loud noise….??? Call it ambient noise. 😂😂😂

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  59. mss burr said:

    I hate the winder units because it destroyed the otter wall of my parents house.. they had to have a contractor to replace their wall. expensive storm windows, and remove black mold…

    Along with security reasons… In my old house that is how the broke into my house…
    So I will never have another window unit…

    With my portable on.. I can just take the house insert out and lock the window before I leave…

    If they break in while I am at home… they just get shot.. lol…

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  60. Sherry Nelson said:

    The only time they make sense is if you live someplace that does not allow window units.
    You will be amazed at the lengths you'll go and the money you will spend to keep cool😠And you left out the fact that you have to empty the condensed water ugh😠

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  61. Dan Peña said:

    Move to south Texas and flap yer gums when it's 98 degrees at midnight.. they are awesome! A blessing! Don't be a pendejo!

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  62. J B said:

    Maybe do a hack of turning a single hose into a twin hose design…I think it is possible.

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  63. TarTarus Zelus said:

    Ya my windows all have bars and my house is from 1925 so a window mount unit is not really an option.

    August 17, 2019
    Reply
  64. Ted Kidd said:

    And with reversing (heating) capability

    August 18, 2019
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  65. keagan said:

    I like seeing the bloopers at the end

    August 18, 2019
    Reply
  66. Andrei2000PC said:

    Looks more like a leaf blower with an AC accessories

    August 18, 2019
    Reply
  67. John David said:

    Now this is a good solution for outdoor cooling, just like a normal fan.

    August 18, 2019
    Reply
  68. Harry D said:

    Yeah! I never learn, bought 2 of them, regret it.

    August 18, 2019
    Reply
  69. david blume said:

    That outside unit needs to be caged in to protect it from copper thieves. Copper thieves love unprotected outside condenser units.

    August 18, 2019
    Reply
  70. Xorcist Bat said:

    Half the battle is knowing when to turn the portables off so you don't get that heat loss exchange. It's easy and I love mine 🙂
    You pay for the ability to take it with you, not have to knock a hole in your wall, etc…

    August 19, 2019
    Reply
  71. Jay Jones said:

    I had one and it was fuckin awful. Never buy one ever!!!!!!

    August 19, 2019
    Reply
  72. EDWARD J. FOX said:

    Love the shirt… I've been checking out some of those EPCOT design offerings on RedBubble as well… lotta cool options… oh, and also, I LOVE every single video I've seen from you… super informative (obviously), & your overall presentation style & sense of humor have me (already subscribed) always clicking the LIKE button. THANK YOU!! Don't stop!!

    August 19, 2019
    Reply
  73. G Voice2 said:

    Look, portables are a COMPROMISE. If you don't understand that, can't comprehend that or aren't willing to live with the result of this compromise, don't buy one.

    HOWEVER, if you need one due to various limitations (window configuration, covenants, liability, aesthetics, etc.) or because you want a unit that is easier (not easy) to move around or to conveniently use OUTDOORS (YES, outdoors – THINK about it), then, just get one and stop worrying about perfection.

    I would advise trying to find one like the Haier 8,000 Btu unit that will exhaust MOST of the condensate (moisture) right along with the hot air. That way, you do not have to empty the reservoir nearly as often – IF EVER.

    I have a Haier 8,000 and it performed exceedingly well to cool my office when the main A/C unit failed. It also cooled my work space during a months-long project in my basement. AND, that was with a 20 foot extension hose!

    I have NEVER emptied a single drop of water from it – Never.

    August 19, 2019
    Reply
  74. 8MoonsOfJupiter said:

    That was probably the easiest to understand explanation of how air-conditioning works that I know of – great stuff!!

    August 20, 2019
    Reply
  75. Ovy Licker said:

    central air is still the gold standard

    August 20, 2019
    Reply
  76. biwwdabeah said:

    One thing I don’t like about portable units is the humidity they let into the room during the the cycle when they are not cooling.

    I have a two hose unit, it’s more efficient than a single hose setup. Do single hose unit have the same humidity leaking back into the room issue?

    August 20, 2019
    Reply
  77. VikeeVeekie said:

    Many people were talking about taping an extra hose to the condenser intake of a portable unit, been there and tried that myself. It only worked on cooler days when it was 30c outside, once the temperature got higher in the week the compressor actually overheated on multiple occasions! https://i.imgur.com/KXJgh7U.jpg

    To set the scene, this was a portable unit that's supposedly 12K BTUs(3.5kW) that I used in my battle against the hottest week of the summer when we approached temperatures of 42c. In the first couple of days it was able to bring the room temperature down to 22.8, maybe even lower because I was getting cold so I set the unit to cycle more often using the thermostat. But as the days passed, our concrete house soaked in the heat in the walls it became a lost cause. The compressor overheated multiple times and on the last day before the heatwave I could only get the room down to 26.5c, and the unit overheated a few times and cut off the compressor which left me waiting for over half an hour for it to cool down while the room temperature was skyrocketing up to 29c.

    Seeing how this is seemingly going to happen every damn year and mini-split systems are getting cheaper,I had enough of it. Bought one and installed it myself and brought in a technician to vacuum the system, perform a pressure test and release the refrigerant. It only took me a week to get it fully up and running, although I could have had it done within a few days if it wasn't for the fact that I was installing it in the middle of the heatwave. But either way, as TC already mentions in the video they are a LOT more efficient. My split system is 9000 BTU (2.5kW) and uses between 450-1100w depending on the heat load in the room. It's actually so efficient that it's double over capacity but it was the 'smallest' unit I could get.

    Also TC, thanks a lot for the video as you inspired me to give the double hose hack a try despite that it didn't really work!

    August 20, 2019
    Reply
  78. Blue Collar Studio said:

    I'm not sure why no one has created an opposite portable AC Unit where the unit is OUTSIDE and the hoses connect to the INSIDE? The only ones I've seen are for the Mini RV market called Climate Right.

    August 21, 2019
    Reply
  79. Joseph Fitzler said:

    Pretty cool stuff

    August 21, 2019
    Reply
  80. Mark S said:

    Window unit cut into a wall works great.

    August 21, 2019
    Reply
  81. Walt S said:

    👍Well done and very helpful!

    August 21, 2019
    Reply
  82. Garrett Powell said:

    I would love to see combined inlet/outlet hose designs

    August 22, 2019
    Reply
  83. WojtekTechTips said:

    What if I tape a second hose to make a 2 hose ac

    August 22, 2019
    Reply
  84. Gustav Krause said:

    I love how you're pointing out the obvious but without actually judging anyone

    August 22, 2019
    Reply
  85. 48956l said:

    LOL this guy HATES portable acs!

    August 22, 2019
    Reply
  86. bunberrier said:

    Very well explained!

    August 23, 2019
    Reply
  87. None of your Business said:

    It's the same weakness that open fireplaces in houses have, or even tile stoves (as long as they do not have an external fresh air feed completely separate from the air insinde the building): yes, they heat up the room, but they also suck in cold air from outside through the combined cracks in doors and windows in the entire house.
    For all their drawbacks, these AC units do, however, still beat what is being sold as "cooling" devices around Europe these days: water evaporators. No, I am not talking about moisture farming (although the result is pretty much the same…), these "AC" devices simply dissipate liquid water into air moisture by blowing the room air across a damp membrane. And these are sold as "cooling" units. Call me stupid as well for trying one because I couldn't believe the dozens of customer reviews reporting solid cooling effects, but of course this was bound to fail on an epic scale:
    Evaporating one or two litres of water in my bedroom in summer completely and utterly failed to lower the temperature during the day, it just managed to slow the heating up by maybe one degree Celsius. At the same time, of course, air humidity skyrocketed from 55% to over 80%, with my humidometer giving me a stern warning to let in some fresh air to vent all the water. If I hadn't, I would have invited the mold to make itself comfortable all over my wallpaper in rain forest climate.
    I have no idea where all the positive reviews for this crap as a cooling unit come from. They can't all be fake. For that, spelling and grammar were just too all-over-the-place. Are people really this stupid?

    August 23, 2019
    Reply
  88. Al Bundy said:

    Another Great video.. Thanks

    August 23, 2019
    Reply
  89. julesdownunder said:

    0:20 UGGH

    August 23, 2019
    Reply
  90. julesdownunder said:

    What do you think of air conditioners without outdoor units? Where they just have two holes on the outside – eg. Unico (Olimpia Splendid), Innova 2.0, Airtemp. How do they compare to the portables and window units? I'm thinking they may look a lot better than both, but may be noisier than a window unit because the motor is inside, just like a portable. Haven't heard one running though.

    August 23, 2019
    Reply
  91. dahuman said:

    Pro tip, use those cheap emergency blankets and cover up the hose, they are the perfect heat reflectors for portable ac hoses.

    August 23, 2019
    Reply
  92. ItsInTheDetails said:

    Why can I not stop learning…
    More data more data!

    August 24, 2019
    Reply
  93. happydorkgirl said:

    Thank you VERY much for this highly informative, science-based video. I have the unfortunate duality of being extremely heat sensitive and highly reactive to allergens/odors/my neighbor's cigarettes thanks to a health condition, so I'm kind of on that line of needing both high efficiency and a one hose system that doesn't bring in air from the outdoors. Looks like I have a big decision to make. 🙁

    August 24, 2019
    Reply
  94. Q G said:

    I have the same LG and can sleep fine with on. This dude just wants to complain about the noise.

    August 24, 2019
    Reply
  95. Damien99 said:

    I bought a Honeywell portable heat pump/AC without really knowing what I was getting. It never worked as well as I expected. I got lucky on 2 items with this portable without knowing that I should be looking for it I bought one with dual hose capability and the Honeywell is quiet compared to the ones in this video. You can hear the air blower of course but when the compressor kicks in you can barely tell a difference in sound level. I have owned it about 4 years. Last week I saw this video and immediately bought a second hose kit for it. (it only came with one) The difference in its cooling ability is amazing. If you have 2 hose capability I highly recommend you use them both.

    August 24, 2019
    Reply
  96. KamakaziOzzie said:

    Sounds like a serious first world problem

    August 24, 2019
    Reply
  97. jacko lantern said:

    EXCELLENT comprehensive review

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  98. gaussminigun said:

    "air conditioners are pretty cool"

    SEINFELD THEME SONG

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  99. Mike ES said:

    No portable for me!!

    August 25, 2019
    Reply
  100. Natsume-Hime said:

    If you read this and you live some place you can make alterations: GET HIGH EFFICIENCY SINGLE ROOM SPLIT SYSTEMS. Like the Mitsubishi Electric ones, the ones that require a punch-out in the wall. Why? Well all the advantages of both a window and a central split system, but… You can also control which rooms you're cooling and when, so you won't be cooling rooms you're not using. They're also installed above windows, so instead of taking up window, or floor space, they take up wall space that you generally won't be using anyways. Plus they're usually more energy efficient even than window units. So they're cheaper to run and better for the environment. Finally, they're also nice and modular, making them also much easier to clean.

    August 25, 2019
    Reply

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