New Latest Technology of 2020 Documentary HD



today partly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny west winds around 15 miles an hour in the afternoon it's 8 a.m. I'm not home but my home knows I'm coming the Internet is expanding and as it does it's giving us almost supernatural powers Alexa you forgot to butter my toast I'm not sure how to help you with that the Internet is no longer just a network of computers and servers now it's a network of things things that know us things that know what we like to eat how long we sleep how to open our front doors and even the rhythm of our heartbeats Alexa where are my keys your keys are in your bedroom at 8:30 a.m. you have a meeting the internet isn't just a cloud now it's got a body a body of devices limbs eyes ears and even a brain each device we connect to the Internet becomes part of it but are these devices at our service or are they secretly pulling the strings today the Internet is everywhere listening to us influencing us becoming part of us but if the internet now has a body how far can it reach the Internet is an intelligence amplifier but almost everything that you can think of a positive and beneficial use for there's also a negative use for human beings they don't end at the edges of our biological tissue tools our appendages extensions of who we are and those tools shape our behavior as much as we shape them as things in our physical life start to be on the internet and interconnected the number of things that could go wrong is just going to grow little robots are doing more things for us than we realize there are now billions of networked sensors they make up what is called the Internet of Things display watching the planet develop a nervous system the merging of a lot of these technologies is going to lead to the first true machine intelligence and then what never can be too careful it's about us controlling the devices before the devices control us but we'd never have our smart devices without the work of one man diagonal Bart Doug Engelbart done Engelbart Doug Engelbart a gang apart Doug was as monofin hiya close anybody I've ever met through his entire life he was focused on one thing intelligence augmentation the notion was the human beings were pretty good but with computers we could be a lot better he imagined networked computing in a way that was both highly technical and highly idealistic even utopian was alive for you all day infinite responses every action you have how much value could you drive from that it was in the fall of 1968 when Doug Engelbart staged what has come to be known as the mother of all demos come in Menlo Park ok there's Don Andrews hand in Menlo Park several thousand computer engineers were in a hall and they saw Doug Engelbart up on a screen using a computer to communicate with people who were not in the same room I'd like now to have a string in Jeff Willis incremental bark he's sitting one just like this and working independently hi Jeff and it was the first time any of them had ever seen computers as a true communication tool suddenly at that moment that roomful of people began to imagine not just computers or computer networks angle Bart is actually the person who invents the computer mouse was kind of like um a little wooden box that you could move around with your hand you think about that for a moment it's something that really accommodates the computer to the human body to the human hand you can see the devices that I'm using again the portrait mode display black on white suit looked like a piece of paper that accomplished he invented a mouse you can point through things on the screens controls through a potentiometer he invented hyperlinks so that you could connect a document to another document I want to I can say the library what am I supposed to pick up there I can just point to that and all I see overdue books and all this was a system which for all practical purposes was a worldwide lamb in a box thank you very much for coming to the dedication ceremonies Engelbart and his lab actually helped humanize the computer the computer would bring us together and by bringing us together would let us be more fully human Steve Jobs was the first one to really get this we're tool builders and that's what a computer is to me it's the most remarkable tool that we've ever come up with and it's the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds three things a widescreen iPod with touch controls a revolutionary mobile phone and a breakthrough internet communications to us these are not three separate devices this is one device and we are calling it iPhone I remember when the iPhone was first announced back in 2007 I could absolutely not wait to get one and when I finally did get my hands on one it felt like I was living in the future and now I can hardly remember what it was like to live without this it's a device made of plastic and metal that has all the answers all the world's knowledge and information that can summon cars that can move mountains that can make people do things all by rubbing a magic mirror and no place has embraced that magic more than Silicon Valley here you see the smartphone everywhere but it's also here that the next generation of smart devices is currently incubating to see them I'm paying a visit to beta Palo Alto z– newest analog store for digital devices hi welcome to beta thank you have you been in before I am NOT under I'm Katrina nice to meet you everything here is out of the box so you can touch it feel it interact with it see how it's gonna fit into your life it's a Bluetooth connected device so you can create light escapes bright day a sunset date night movie night you no longer have to carry your keys you can control it directly from your app 3d video viewing well any command that you would be able to give your phone you can do through the button will automatically water for you you can interact with it you can touch it and talk to it put it on your keys you can put it on your kid your dog your backpack whatever yeah we're talking I haven't oh my goodness I want the betta store feels like a toy store for grown-ups but as I was about to find out it's less a store than a research lab where they're collecting data about you our store was made to bring the best parts about the Internet to brick-and-mortar retail although our store does sell products we make no money from selling products which is very unusual in the in the brick and mortar world and back for the only store like that how do you make a profit if you're not making any money off selling products we have this really unique business model for retail where we directly rent space to companies and they partner with a company called retail next retail X has figured out how to use computer vision from overhead cameras to understand how people shop in stores at the betta store the most important sensor isn't on the shelves it's actually in the ceiling as you interact with products these cameras are watching you measuring how much time you spend at each station and learning what you like and the customers don't know necessarily that they're being tracked or if anything like this is the most naive version of track me out there I came to bata to look at smart devices but I was surprised to discover that they were actually looking at me to learn more about how smart cameras help retailers like bata I paid a visit to the maker of the sensor retail next wouldn't it be great to know your shopper to know what catches her eye introducing Aurora by retail next the first all-in-one sensor designed specifically for the complex needs of retail the next-generation sensor for shopper measurement so walk me through this you know someone comes into the store what sorts of data could you tell about that person you can tell a lot about the type of person coming into the store male-female approximate age and you can capture a lot of information about that path through the store how how can you tell age and gender of the people walking into a store yeah so it's using computer vision it works very similar to how human eyes work but it's all algorithms doing that automatically if you want to understand the type of custom in the shops a particular store at a particular time you can do that quite well retail necks cameras help retailers identify and target their best customers but other analytics companies take facial recognition to a new level the system does not need an exaggerated expression the system can also detect micro expressions some use cameras that can tell how you feel about a product whether you like it or not but while cameras are very useful sensors for retailers they're nothing compared to the one we have on us all the time our smartphone they want to use the unique identifiers that are associated with your cell phone to find out where you shop how long you linger in which section of the store for retailers your smartphone is like your digital fingerprint it tells them if you visited their store before and when you were there last if ten years ago someone said to you would you mind if I planted a little tracking device on you that would tell me where you are what you're reading what you're spending money on who you're talking to and what you're doing 24 hours a day would that be okay and you'd say hell no you kidding I would never let you do that now people sleep in front of the Apple store for three days for the privilege of buying an $800 sensor that does exactly that in a lot more [Applause] retail next insists that while they don't ask permission to track you your data is completely anonymous unless you opt in if you opt in you've let companies know exactly who you are and they can now track and target you in real-time but this kind of tracking didn't begin in stores it began online online retailers don't have cameras and sensors to track you they don't need them they have something better the cookie so what exactly is a cookie and how do companies use it to track us to find out I spoke to this guy that's good Lou Monte Lee invented the cookie in 1994 concepts a little bit like a fortune wrapped in a cookie a cookie is a file and the fortune inside is a unique string of text you can't read it but websites can each time you visit websites place cookies on your computer these bite-sized files help websites remember you this is what allows you to do things like shopping carts you get this fortune cookie and your hold on to the cookie you know you don't know what's inside of it it really don't you really don't care and when you visit the website again you give the cookie back and the website breaks up and reads the mess and says oh I know who you are you you're the guy who wanted to purchase a toaster and I will put that in your shopping cart and that was the idea harmless right something unforeseen happened it didn't take long before advertisers noticed cookies and ad networks started using them to track us you start this really terrible arms race and the arms race is to know as much about you as possible they could target advertisements in a way that never worked on TV because the TV is a medium that you watch the Internet is a medium that watches you as you watch it today every move you make online each cookie you receive it becomes part of a virtual profile or a dossier of you these profiles include information we don't even think of ourselves as leaking I were a Fitbit so I'm trying to lose some weight and what that means is a couple times a day I am reporting my physical activity levels to Fitbit which may well be aggregating and selling my data to people who want to put me on diet plans you get this sort of three-dimensional picture of somebody we can actually predict what they're going to do they now can find out exactly who's most susceptible to be manipulated to buying various products there are con men that are looking for older people and they know that that person has been online looking at places to invest money and how to best retire that get the phone call and invest your life savings in this new stock so if you have all that data you could target somebody who is in a weakened state that's the danger right now but the emergence of these virtual dossiers was predicted long ago this educational film from 1967 lays out a future all-too-familiar by the year 2000 computers will invade our privacy on a scale hardly imaginable they will be interconnected and unless prevented by new legislation we'll be able to sell information on where we travel how much we spend and in what restaurants and hotels whether and when we pay our bills what we do with our evenings and with hope they will be twenty typewritten pages of dossier on each of 230 million citizens in North America today your dossier has all this information and much much more but the company with the most valuable dossier is when you probably use every day Google Google knows a lot about us because Google knows our intentions and when we think about the world of advertising intention based advertising tends to be the stuff that actually works it was not so long ago that people were saying how does anyone think this company can make money by giving away search it was considered a silly idea Google's massive ad network which includes pop-ups generates billions of dollars for the company every month in fact 90% of the company's revenue comes from ads and Google only gets paid if people click now most of the web pages that you visit on the internet allow Google to track you most people love YouTube I love you too why did they purchase YouTube because it gives them more information why did they develop Chrome a browser why did they develop Android an operating system they're collecting information on us on more than 60 different platforms and we are completely oblivious when was the last time you read a 60 page User Agreement my guess is you probably just clicked I agree I certainly do and when we aren't actively online it's easy to forget that the Internet of Things is still watching us everywhere you go even when you're not actively using your phone it's still listening companies are finding very clever ways to get us engaged in helping them with their businesses and if they can't get us they're asking our devices to do it the devices that are going to inhabit our lives not just cell phones but your smart refrigerator your smart car all those things are basically going to be eavesdropping tools for someone maybe the most sinister of this is the talking Barbie dome introducing a whole new way to play with Barbie there's now a Barbie doll that when you turn it on will find your Wi-Fi network and will use the cloud to have a conversation with you about your interests what do you want to be when you grow up that's wonderful wanting to take care of sick animals is an amazing goal hello Barbie is recording all these conversations and sending them to the cloud to me this is basically a Barbie doll designed to interrogate an eight year old girl and get her to tell stories I want to be a scientist well I guess at school I really enjoyed chemistry and physics yes I have definitely fallen down a number of times in my life Barbie my right I think you are right Barbie I knew you were a smart cookie as long as our devices work for corporations they'll push us into being good consumers but what if someday soon our machines not only prompt us to buy they also offer us a new form of currency chairs we'll share our tastes our interests and even our private lives share your biometric data today 500 points your biometric data indicates you didn't sleep well are you feeling okay Lucy does your boyfriend know you're pregnant however strange this may seem now it will very quickly become the new normal today the devices that connect us to the world also – for information but none of this would be possible without a World War 2 era technology and the most beautiful woman in the world the technology of course is wireless but the woman you are the man I think you are you'll get miss Hedy Lamarr to seal it with a kiss what about it Eddie by 1938 American audiences knew the Austrian actress Hedy Lamarr as a dynamic and stunning leading lady funny I don't have an ear for beauty just a knife but she was no ordinary movie star she was an inventor Hedy spent her evenings inventing an improved traffic light and a tablet that carbonated and flavored your water but as she watched Europe descend into chaos ahead he turned her attention to inventions that could help the war effort it has a strange effect on me how she wondered could radio transmissions be secured from enemy eavesdropping then she heard this ballet mechanic this music was written in 1924 by an avant-garde composer George and tile who saw it as a celebration of machines as music makers his complex arrangement included three xylophones for bass drums three airplane propellers and sixteen player pianos player pianos used paper rolls with punch holes to generate the music but ballet mechanics roles were special they were synchronized hedy lamarr realized that the synchronized paper rolls were just what she needed for her next invention secure radio communication using player pianos as inspiration she and Anne tile designed a system called frequency hopping in which a secret message would hop across radio frequencies to do this the system used punch holes on a paper roll but unlike a player piano these holes wouldn't control musical notes they'd instead control frequencies the message would be sent in pieces and on the receiving side an identical paper roll would reassemble the message she done it frequency-hopping made radio transmissions impervious to eavesdropping Hedy immediately donated her patent to the military but the commanders weren't impressed they turned up their noses at the idea of a secure system of paper rolls her invention lay dormant for decades but Hedy had the right idea and it was not lost on everyone forever it was a hidden goldmine those who think getting a car phone is not for them whatever the reason haven't kept up with the booming industry of cellular radio telephones in the 1980s frequency hopping was finally Declassified and we quickly got the first cellular telephone this nokia moped a portable cellular phone is just 595 Hedy Lamarr's idea sparked a chain reaction an explosion of wireless devices since the year 2000 mobile data traffic has increased nearly 400 million times and much of this growth has come in the developing world the invention that Hedy hoped would save the world has instead transformed it cultures are now skipping a generation of technology developing cultures where there was no telephone there was no running water there was no electricity now you bring a cell phone into that village and its horizons expand unimaginably it'll be a billion handsets in Africa in 2016 which is extraordinary the poorest on the planet can afford a mobile phone this idea of wireless mobility will change the way people think about themselves about national boundaries about education about almost everything wireless now covers the earth almost like a layer of atmosphere it's easier than ever before to stay connected but are we really more connected to the people around us what is the impact of technology on our daily lives interactions are being always mediated by a technological device it is not all benign it's getting noisier and noisier you have to move away from the noise what if you could live somewhere truly quiet without all the wireless noise welcome to the quiet zone we're in the middle of what's called the National Radio quiet zone and it's an area that is unique in North America it's 13,000 square miles about the size of Massachusetts and Connecticut combined at the heart of the quiet zone lies the town of Green Bank West Virginia home of the largest steerable radio telescope in the world the quiet zone was created to protect it the Green Bank telescope is a Swiss watch the size of a football stadium but while it is so enormous its tolerances are measured in fractions of a millimeter we're talking about a telescope that stands taller than the Statue of Liberty but the reflector surface is 2.3 acres in size the bigger the bucket the more raindrops you catch today the telescope is on the cutting edge of SETI the search for extraterrestrial intelligence in recent years we've discovered with the Green Bank telescope the basic organic molecules the kind of things that in some sense are the building blocks of life floating out in the gas between the stars but these discoveries come at a price radio silence for hundreds of miles in all directions unlike traditional telescopes radio telescopes don't see they listen for radio waves in the 1950s astronomers built the telescope here because it was a quiet place to do just that listen the observatory started in the 50s and they picked Green Bank specifically they say we are the quietest place on earth so I don't know maybe this is the last quiet place there is for Green Bank residents this doesn't just mean radio silence it means Wireless silence yes the limiting green mag does have its challenges can't have a cordless phone forget a cell your phone there's no cell towers here at wireless speakers wireless headphones door openers caused problems electric fence around someone's garden microwaves Bluetooth devices from a control cars PS fours wheeze Nintendo's the craziest things that you would never think would cause interference that do put the telescope's biggest threat is Wi-Fi Wi-Fi here just completely overwhelms what we're what's also amazing though is that we're beginning to interact with the Internet as if it is the only other social being we have in our lives and that is the dangerous part I think Mike's idea made me wonder what about being a teenager in a disconnected town would you feel you're missing out this school asked me when she first moved here if we had something service she was like I can't get any service on myself that I was like you're not going to this is green banks middle school in the shadow of the Green Bank telescope say you're here and then you get in like New York or Maryland I think honestly it's like the internet crashed here right now and we had no internet we could survive city people sit on the side of the road and wait for all these people to come get them and we can get out and change our tire and get back in and go home like we need to we don't have to call people on our cell phones we actually drive to their house and knock on their front door I feel sometimes that we are the control population for a gigantic experiment being played on humanity by the telecommunications industry we are living without the benefits and distractions of cellular technology I'm basically shocked at what I see I see people standing next to one another diddling with their little devices it feels to me like while I wasn't looking the whole world took up cigarette smoking elsewhere the Internet is attached to you all of the time whether you're purposefully utilizing it or not it's doing something with your device even when it's in your pocket but you're tethered to it here you're not tethered to it it's interesting to think that something special has happened here but in fact it's almost the opposite is something weird has happened everywhere else Greene bankers may enjoy their radio silence but for the rest of us living without our mobile devices wouldn't just be unpleasant it would be impossible we are outsourcing our memories into these devices and we're so dependent on them now there's no backup system most college-age students say they can't go add a device free for many people the cell phone has become a body appendage they can't not be with it the information is essentially their third skin the library of all human knowledge is now just a screen away we may think this means we're getting smarter but we're relying more and more on machines to do the thinking for us what used to be research has been replaced with search Google search in 1998 Larry Page and Sergey Brin launched Google to unravel the tangle of information on the web they did this using algorithms they used one algorithm to index the web and another one to rank the results from the billions of pages in the index they gave you the ability to effectively search through every page of every book in the library PageRank Google's ranking algorithm decided which page would be in the coveted first place the more links you got the more PageRank score you get but could be that somebody could have fewer links but for more important places those links would count for more that was their secret sauce PageRank worked so well that Google quickly became synonymous with search but while search results often number in the millions or even billions usually only ten matter typically you see ten search results on the first page 50% of our clicks go to the top two search results 50% and most people never look beyond the first page but what we have begun to realize is that search rankings are impacting decisions people make about everything we let Google decide what's the best information for us but with millions of results that may match your query why do you get these 10 hey guys today I wanted to give you my answer to the big question how to rank number one in Google when Google designed its algorithm it inadvertently created a new industry search engine optimization today we're gonna talk about great SEO and what I believe Google wants there's a new Google ranking factor that's huge right now Rudi sneaky and really clever that tactic so make sure you implement that these experts have learned how to optimize a website structure or content to make it a top result the algorithm is the key to cracking Google now what if I told you that we have cracked Google's formula all too often we focus on beating the Googlebot rather than feeding the Googlebot whether a website knows how to feed the Googlebot might determine which brand of dog food you purchase it may affect where you apply to college and it could even impact an election we believe that because it's a computer program operating however it's happening we can trust it the algorithm has to put things into an order so what if the algorithm itself ends up favoring one candidate over another is the activity on Google in fact creating more interest in a candidate and in turn generating more votes but this problem isn't limited to search engines Facebook has run experiments and manipulating the outcomes of election I mean the way they do it is they can actually make you more likely to vote if Facebook just sent out go out and vote reminders but they sent them only to people of one political party if they did that on voting day they could easily flip an election backlash bring against Facebook former Facebook insider calling it quote absolutely by as an article posted Monday said Facebook workers suppress conservative-leaning news stories in it's trending section people thought this was outrageous because here's this neutral technical system and then opinionated humans were coming in and mucking with it but that's an absurd way to look at these things there are no neutral technological systems today the most advanced algorithms are artificial intelligence programs called neural networks like dogs these a eyes aren't programmed they're trained a process called machine learning toy duck yes that is correct the next generation of robots will learn like an insect or a baby it'll bump into things it'll learn how to walk learn how to navigate into this world rather than having all the lessons program from the very start but with machine learning artificial intelligence is no longer fully under our control machines become as intelligent as we are assuming that we are intelligent any machine that can make decisions choices which could behave in a way which is not predictable bias designers and there are many machines like this now I'm thrilled to be here to introduce a brand new product in 2015 Google released an AI program to organize photos using machine learning google photos understands what's important and helps you by automatically organizing your memories and was caught off guard when their algorithm labeled a photo of african-americans as guerrillas people who train these artificial intelligence systems train them on white people's faces these weren't necessarily racist people but their implicit biases of how they built and trained these systems end up embedding this incredibly set of racist assumptions and just because a machine can learn from humans doesn't mean they'll teach it the right thing as Microsoft learned from their chat bot teh humans love to corrupt AI the more you talk the smarter take X Microsoft designed a software to mimic the speech patterns of 18 to 24 year olds even the best algorithms make mistakes at scale it did not take long for internet trolls to poison tase my tase designers trained the bot to improvise based on what people said to her algorithms are a lot more likely to make mistakes some people are and they can also be tricked much more easily than people can xunte was ranting about Hitler watching racist and anti-feminist attacks these systems have amazing blind spots this happens all the time algorithms are used for everything from college admissions online dating hiring decisions loan approvals stock market investments through to studying influenza outbreaks and cancer research a series of programming algorithms are making decisions without any of us having insight how those decisions are being made and that's a little bit scary machines are gonna be running my life and everyone else's so I was curious to know how they learn and here at MIT they're learning something that up to now only humans could do drive welcome to ducky town ducky town may look cute but it's got a real mission to test the challenges of driverless vehicles quickly with the safety of miniature scale what's the advantage of researching autonomous vehicles in ducky town so the idea here is that well now we have this city where we can deploy 50 of these things very easily in an afternoon and we don't waste a lot of time with the logistical problems but the research problems are still preserved what it's doing right now is it's using the camera to identify the road lines mm-hm and then when it gets to an intersection it reads the intersection sign and then picks a random allowable direction to turn based on what it reads on the sign what are the really hard problems to solve and making a truly autonomous vehicle one big problem is that every piece of the environment has to be perceived somehow and that includes pedestrians cyclists other cars the hard part is being right about that 100% of the time to establish me to all the problems that they haven't figured out just yet unpredictable humans bad weather detours and what to do in the event of an unavoidable our self-driving cars have a lot to learn but unlike us they learn quickly really quickly there's this new idea that's very powerful in robotics called cloud robotics which basically is the realization you can interconnect every robot with the internet so if you're a robot and you learn something all of the robots will know immediately that's learning that's very different than human learning and it's not science fiction at all it's already being deployed in the self-driving car world our robots today understand space they understand their location in space they can navigate in space but not much more but what happens when robots can do everything we can do with artificial intelligence we are summoning the demon you know you know all those stories where is the guy with the pentagram and holy water and he's like yeah you sure you can control the demon then work out we should not be confident in our ability to keep a super intelligence genie locked up in its bottle forever sooner or later it will out a super intelligent AI has the potential to tip the balance of power if a cloud-based intelligence can communicate instantly how will we humans maintain control hello to find out more about machine intelligence I decided to videoconference with Kevin Warwick professor of cybernetics at Coventry University he's interested in merging human and machine intelligence to create a hybrid a cyborg what are your thoughts on artificial intelligence well if you can't beat them join them so taking the very powerful artificial intelligence system and linking it to you you become part of it it becomes part of you and so you take onboard the power of AI rather than have it acting against you Kevin explained that while humans and machines seem different our minds both used electrical signals and binary code brain cells fire or they dump fire just as artificial brain cells in the computer fire or danfa each brain cell is a binary signal just like a computer in fact you can send brain signals across the internet as though it's your nervous system Kevin doesn't just study the theoretical possibilities of using the Internet as a nervous system he's actually plugged himself in in 2002 Kevin implanted an electrode array in his arm and connected it to a robotic hand over the Internet becoming the world's first cyborg whoa I went to Columbia University in New York and the guys there helped me plug my nervous system into the internet and we link to a robot hand in the UK with the implants in place linked to the Internet when I moved my hand in New York the robot hand then moved from my brain signals in the UK my brain was receiving signals back from the fingertips and I was able to feel how much force the hand was applying on a different continent and that is incredible so with the internet and with an implant your brain and your body don't have to be in the same place that arm can be I mean ultimately it can be on a different planet do you think that ultimately down the track that leads us to kind of meld our nervous systems in a big Network this cybernetic network could help humans and machines understand each other better I mean when you look at how humans communicate and compare it to technology I mean you have to be embarrassed frankly it is terrible the interface we're still using even now I'm using mechanical pressure waves to communicate this car highly complex electrochemical signals in my brain and then I convert those to these trivial coded pressure waves it's terrible really I mean we've got to get with the times we have the technology now to upgrade humans so we need to do it some call this upgrade the singularity the point of no return since the birth of artificial intelligence we've wondered when AI would catch up to us perhaps the time will come and will we in the machines of the past in opposite directions Olivia transition point when we can't decide whether it's a man and a machine or a machine and a man but the question is what will life be like after the singularity you'll take a little pill it will arrange itself wire into your visual cortex into your hearing system to the rest of your brain and you know put you on the Internet welcome our brain will interact with all the chips in the room we just walk into a room mentally turn on the lights mentally turn on the Internet we simply blink and see all the information we need to know to conduct the day's business it's gonna start to change how we think of where we end in the world begins because more and more is gonna be who's gonna feel like each of us is living in our own personalized universe we're all going to be enveloped by an AI software shell you're gonna give your AI and permission to listen to every conversation you have read all your emails monitor all your your biometric body data and that a eyes mission is to make your life better but once the singularity arrives machine intelligence will quickly be out of our control as soon as a computer in some sense wakes up because it has access through the internet it has access to everything all human knowledge it will transform into something else if we do have a world of super smart robots if we are very very lucky they will treat us like pets however if we're very very unlucky they will treat us like food me I'm hoping for the pet scenario I call the internet the Internet's we have been building a nest for the first true machine intelligences that arise when you talk about unintended consequences yeah you end up with you know maybe something that we think is gonna be really good and that is it I think when you consider how reliant we are upon the invisible systems that surround us every day and provide us so much we're at a fork in the road what if the internet doesn't enslave us what if instead it becomes our guiding light from the moment were born we'll look to it for wisdom and beauty it will see our strengths and fostered it will guide us to realize our potential and provide answers to our biggest questions as humans we have always yearned to understand our connection to the cosmos our place in the universe perhaps our greatest creation the Internet well someday return the favor and enlighten us you

2 Comments

  1. Coach Cat said:

    Thank you world documentary for this!! Doug angle… um I learned a lot🤭🤣

    June 28, 2019
    Reply
  2. c clarke said:

    Helloooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooôoppppppppppppp

    June 28, 2019
    Reply

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