LTE Cat-M and NB-IOT Hype Webinar



everyone thanks for joining us today welcome to our webinar on the hype and realities behind CAD m and MB IOT I'm joined here today with our CTO Brian Ray who will be on chat and potentially chiming in from time to time I'm Glen Schatz I'm our VP of business development and I also head up our product line of cellular products I'm really excited to be here today we've been talking about cellular on technologies for the last couple of years and I think we're at a point where we really are starting to see them hit the market and become reality so I decided to host this webinar really because ever since we announced the first end device certified on the Verizon network about a year ago we've had hundreds of phone calls with customers and we get a lot of questions about it and we're as guilty as anyone else about some of the hype between when we first sort of find our device and now there have been a lot of changes in the market more announcements technology has matured a lot and so what I really want to do today is focus on the state of the market today the state of devices today and stay away from any tremendously forward-looking guesses I don't want to talk about the billions of devices that are we connected to the Internet I really want to focus on what's real today do the diverse nature of the attendees I'm going to try to keep it at a very high level and potentially oversimplifies some things so if you're an expert and you find my explanation wanting feel free to reach out I'm happy to have a more detailed technical conversation with you in the future and also preface this with I'm not sharing any insider information I've had a lot of questions about talking about specific costs of specific carriers or devices I'm gonna stay away from that it keeps us at a high level but again happy to talk to you afterwards if you reach out so without further ado the presentation so just some housekeeping we're gonna talk about today is just an overview of CAD m1 and M v1 all interchangeably refer to it as LTE M and M be IOT we're gonna cover the low-power operations which are the most important features of these technologies and then go through some of the design and business considerations behind it trying to be as specific as possible thinking about the future and then I received a lot of questions beforehand I'll address some of those as well as take some some live questions here just some housekeeping if you want to submit a question you can go to our forum you could sign up start a new topic or like I said Brian our CTO is in the chat window and he'll be able to to help out with the with any live questions yeah I'm not seeing the full slideshow maybe you want to try to share your screen in a different way sure yeah did you share the stop sharing and then just share your desktop yeah how's this no I'm pretty behind so I'm like thirty seconds or more behind so go ahead and just okay so I'll link labs link Labs has been a an innovator in the low-power wireless space for several years every application you see on the screen is something that we've done or helped our customers do everything from Rhino tracking to golfcart tracking to gas and water meters agricultural sensors alarm systems shipping you know you name it we've we've done something with it you know in addition to our OEM business where we sell components we also have a pretty robust professional services division that helps our customers implement some of these technologies as all address throughout the presentation designing for low-power is really hard and so one of the benefits of these new solar technologies is that they are low-power but it's not as simple as slapping a module on an existing device and connecting to the internet there's a lot more that goes into it than that so I'll try to touch on that throughout this presentation just a brief overview of cat m1 and M b1 I'm again I'm gonna keep this at a pretty high level I'm not gonna get into any 3gpp history or any of the real details behind them but just some things to note Ken m1 has a simplified design a 1.4 megahertz front end as opposed to 20 megahertz from a traditional cellular module or key attritional 40 cellular module lower uplink and downlink speeds one of the nice things about CAD M is that they can be deployed in existing LTE bands in a lot of cases they can be upgraded with just software km one supports mobility it supports photo LT location-based services and voice over LTE and be one of the other hand is even simpler has a tuna kilohertz front end so the chips that's can be a little bit less expensive 10 to 20 percent or so less expensive than CAD am a little bit slower and depending on if you're using a single tone versus multi tone for uplink you know can be as low as 20 kilobits per second the nice thing about MB one is that it can be deployed in a lot of different ways including in existing LTE bands and guard bands and reef arm spectrum some countries are putting out specific IOT bands which MB IOT can be put out in some of the downsides is that it requires new base station hardware and doesn't currently support mobility and so you know we see M v1 is more designed for static assets and the way I trying to think about it is when on the hook atom it seemed to me always like part of the 5g roadmap where's MV IOT came out as really competitors or some of the other low-power wider and networks that are out there like Laura and sig Fox and so you know there's there's some reasons you might use one or the other we are focusing on ket m1 initially because that's what's being rolled out in the United States we think that power is a more diverse set of applications as well so that's what we're focused on one thing to note about both technologies is that you'll get better coverage all other things being equal then existing LTE networks by about 10 to 20 DB which you know in practical sense will get you a little bit deeper building penetration so maybe one wall deeper even to potentially battery performance which I'll go into later on is gonna be application specific one thing to note is that MV 1 has a lower peak current so you might have some more flexibility in battery selection but in general the battery selection is going to be very very application specific I'm gonna spend some time focusing on the different parts of cellular IOT system and this applies to to all some of our IOT systems and not just CAD m and MB IOT there's a lot of confusion over you know when you use the word module what that means how the different platforms fit in and so just going from left to right on the screen a typical cellular IOT system will have the application so which is a sensor or actuator or some other type of i/o a host application processor that controls that application as well as does some you know local logic if that is required and handles the interface with the the modem you know there's a battery involved there there's some power management in memory then there's a cellular module typically and that involves a an our front end a baseband chip set some power management and some memory a sim is involved somewhere in the process it could either be on the application board or the or the module board depending on how your system is set up it will communicate to a network that network will then send it into the cellular networks internal systems the data will be then passed somehow to the to the end user so just to break down each component again to avoid confusion there are four providers right now of KM baseband chipsets sequence who we use Altair Qualcomm and Intel all provide baseband chip sets this is the lowest level piece of the stack when it comes to solar IOT the chipset itself is typically pretty challenging to implement unless you're producing millions of devices or your module manufacturer you typically wouldn't use the chipset on its own the next level up which is what most of us talk about when we talk about a cellular module includes the baseband chip set some sort of RF front end potentially some power management as well as some memory I have a bunch of different vendors here these are all the vendors that currently have CAD M or MB IOT products announced so you know C Kwan's again makes their own module Gemalto u-blox quick tell Sierra tell it 5a comm Huawei WNC and simcom what didn't won't leave anyone out but so these modules are typically FCC certified or ranked have regulatory certifications but they're not something that you can just go and put on the network so they all have to be certified by the carrier but that carrier certification isn't enough to go put the the modules on the network and I'll get into that a little bit later the next type of device in the system was what I would call a hardware platform different companies call this different things they call them systems platforms modems you know this is where link Labs plays the the red lines you know in quipment compass a lot of different things that vendors incorporate in their hardware platform it may include simplified hardware interfaces like pinnate interfaces that are standard across a product family proprietary software stacks that do different things the sim holder or the ECM might be in this platform there might be some power management and might tie into a cloud platform there might be some sort of free certification on various carriers and so when you hear of a hardware platform or a socket modem or some sort of system on a module this is what vendors are typically talking about and it's best to understand how this plays with your application what the development looks like and how you might use it rather than trying to you know just look for different features because in the end they're all just different ways of incorporating the same types of cellular modules that are out there so brief slide on network availability I put this light up there it's it's hard to see and that's on purpose you know this is from several different vendors they're different outlook on what the market is in terms of what networks have which types of coverage whether it's CAD M or MB IOT what I'm trying to put forward in this slide is to trust what you can test you know there's there's a lot of hype in this market still around Network announcements and now it's been said certain devices in certain areas but I can tell everyone that's listening today is that Verizon has a Kadim network we use it it works it has all the features that you need for a kind of network AT&T has a kind of network we don't currently use it but we have trusted partners that are using it and we will be using that network as well soon outside of that I have a lot of discussions with carriers different carriers have rolled out test networks I'm not going to get into the different carriers here I would suggest that you make sure you engage with your local carrier beyond just the marketing folks and talk to the device technologies people some of the more technical people about when network availability is is going to be where you need it to be for deployment and then also make sure you're talking to the hardware vendors because the hardware vendors are often network specific and so you know for example you might have a module vendor that can support lots of different bands but they may have only certified on a couple carriers so you know again in order to get behind a from the hype and into what you can actually deploy you just need to ask the questions of the people that are so you either service or hardware and I'm happy to talk specifics with anyone if you have specific questions about specific carriers you know if you reach out directly I can talk to you about that so this is the part of the presentation where I'm going to focus a lot of time on the different low-power modes and how low-power operations work the two main low-power modes the two that that CAD M&M B IOT support are PSM or power savings mode as well as EDR X extended discontinuous receive mode there are different types of power savings modes that have different use cases PSM is designed primarily for event or time or driven uplink or or a high latency downlink like a mailbox check if a device moves during the sleep period you might have some power degradation and wake up as it's you know updating its tracking area as it's looking for towers you'll still have some power savings over just turning the device on and off but you know what I would say here is make sure you're piloting before you're taking any any risk over fully deploying a battery-powered system because your performance in the field is going to have a lot of variability and depend on signal coverage and how often your advice moves and lots of other things and how your battery performs in the real world versus in the lab or on a spreadsheet in your X is a little bit different than PSM it basically is a replacement for an always-on device that can afford a little bit more latency a typical LTE paging cycle is one point two eight seconds and the device can be reached by the network if try because hewed for it during that cycle DRX extended that paging cycle to up to ten point two four seconds but that that window is still not going to give you enough battery savings for multi-year types of applications and with EDR ex-cat m1 and n b1 extended the normal idle window to five point one two seconds for Ken m and twenty-eight point 40 seconds for and B and it basically tells the network how many hyper frames that can sleep before it's checking back in for traffic and one of the nice things about EDR X is that you can adjust the paging cycles up to a maximum of 44 minutes roughly for Ken m and three hours for Mao T so it's basically like a you know always-on device that is only going to be able to receive data at certain intervals so we like EDR X for devices that are always on that don't necessarily require super super low latency downlink or queuing from the network so there are different reasons you would use both either one you can use both you know the more you mess with power and the more complicated your design gets so just keep that in mind as you're thinking about it at linked labs we've tried to make this easy for customers and you know basically by helping them choose which power modes are best for their applications and I'll discuss that again a little bit later on in this presentation so rather than talk through specifics about you know the battery sleep currents and peak currents and the different cycles I decided to talk through some example applications and these are applications that we've actually tested our estimated battery lives are based on unreal performance in the field in different modes and so you know the I decided to start with the most complicated application or one of the more complicated applications out there a GPS tracker with GPS trackers the GPS fixed itself matters a lot so deciding what your fix interval is goes a long way in understanding your battery life you know the more logic that can be built in using accelerometers or other types of technology to extend battery life are really important for a GPS application so for the the application I've listed here I put them super GPS tracker so it has a relatively small battery the device you see on the right is a reference design that we have it's about the size of a credit card about half an inch thick you know you can see the battery life varies significantly based on the fixed and transmission interval and the different power modes actually don't make a ton of difference from a you know from a a battery life standpoint it carves off some some days and so but you can see with a tracker like this you can get several months checking in you know once a day or help times a day you know if you're using this device for something that needs to check in more regularly you probably want to charge it daily but there's still pretty good performance for a device this small with this small battery the the last two where I left him there just as a comparison if you use PSM mode versus just toggling the device on and off so what that would show is an improvement over a traditional cellular device that you could still do some of these low-power operations with but you couldn't get quite as low as you would if you implemented PSM I see Brian smiling over here so you guys must all be asking him some interesting questions now really that were joking about ceccacci voters oh if we do like to cache enclosure so another example application would be Environmental Center with some sort of alarm condition you know this has a much much longer battery life because it doesn't have the GPS fix and so you can see you can get nearly a year of battery life or you know 10 months of battery life checking in once a day in PSM mode again this is a relatively small battery so 450 million power battery compare that with your cell phone which are typically 2500 million powers or more so in battery selection was important for your application you know you can potentially use for something like this three double A batteries you know there's there's lots of different outlet options for batteries but this is just kind of an example of different types of battery lives under different use cases another thing to note as you're thinking about battery is that cell modems require much higher sustained peak currents than say like a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth tracker so it can be up to 400 milliamps for you know seconds in the dozens of seconds sometimes so only certain chemistry's will work and so that's going to potentially increase the cost of your device because you're gonna have to use a more expensive battery so you know the idea of using a coin cell or something with a cell device is not really an option for you so we had a lot of questions come in before the webinar about about batteries batteries are very complicated conversation epicly Frank and one that will typically work with customers on a professional services basis typically battery selection as part of our scoping phase so feel free to reach out and I can get you in touch with the right folks at link Labs I can that our battery experts that can help you with with that problem and then the last application you know we we hear a lot of talk about these 10 year plus batteries powered applications like gas and water meters and really what I'm showing you here is that that's a real that's a real claim with a seven point seven amp power C cell battery which you can get out there virtually relatively easily you can get you know over ten years checking in a few times a day with a gas meter one of the nice things about water and gas meters is they're static so once you've done your initial testing you don't really have to worry too much about the cell network performing differently in the real world as you might with a mobile asset and you know this is just to show you that you can almost double battery life using PSM mode versus maybe using a 2g modem and just turning it on and off so you know I think I see a lot of these applications over time incorporating 10mm or MB IOT because it's just it's a no-brainer so I mentioned some of this earlier but you know chemistry is really important only certain types of batteries will work they tend to be more expensive and a little bit more boutique batteries so make sure you're thinking about that early on batteries are typically a very expensive on a percentage basis cost of your bomb and so as you're talking to vendors about the various costs you know make sure you're focusing on on battery and you know being able to right-size your battery is really important and so we see a lot of people you know we have this reference GPS design and we see a lot of people ask us well can you just get us an off-the-shelf version of it but the first question I ask is what's your application how long does need to last and then we start thinking about battery and you know if you're doing 10,000 devices or 5,000 devices shifting from a one amp hour battery to a 450 million power battery might save you a few dollars on bond cost which you know would make it worthwhile and doing a specific design for your application same thing goes for enclosures as well but batteries especially and then the final consideration that I would say is make sure you're testing your device in the real world you're getting real data you know you're testing in different types of environments different locations because your battery's gonna perform on a real cell network a little bit differently that it does in you know the lab or in your office so make sure you're testing Brian do we have any emergent questions on the first half yeah i'm celina as they come up okay awesome that's why it's good to have your CTO as your sidekick you can typically take on take a lot of all comers so the next next part you know I had a lot of questions around cost and as I mentioned I'm gonna stay away from specifics on costs a lot of this is gonna be you know based on who you are as a buyer you know if you're coca-cola chances are you're gonna be getting a better price than Joe start up down the street trying to do a dog tracker so I will talk some specifics and specific ranges just to give everyone a sense of orders of magnitude but when it comes to specific components really go through your distributors go directly to the vendors one thing that people also sometimes don't consider when they're talking about the cost of a device is the design considerations so you know the more integrated the the device the cheaper the component cost will be but also the more complicated the design will be so you know a lot of people say well why can't I just implement the Qualcomm or sequence chip you know the baseband chip and I got a bunch of smart people my company we can we can build out the rest of it and you know my response to that is sure you can maybe get that baseband chip for five dollars but you're gonna be putting you know in the seven figures into both the design and development as well as the certification once you start doing that so you know keep in mind is not all about the chipset cost or the component cost it's really about the total cost of ownership as well as the complexity of managing it throughout and then you know certification and testing is an important consideration it's usually more predictable but it's worth noting a lot of questions around how much these IOT plans costs I'll dress that a little bit and then there's another wouldn't say it's a hidden cost but it's a cost that people don't think about it's how do you manage tens of thousands of devices as a company if your company's business model is to sell gas meters or to you know build smoke alarms are you really in the business of managing tens of thousands of devices over you know the nation or the world and we'll talk about that a little bit as we go through so again these are just you know ranges really you want to consult with your distributor or your your vendors directly for these ranges I'm assuming about ten thousand units a year so just keep that in mind the block on the left is the host application so you're typically the host application PCB your memory your microcontroller connectors other components are gonna cost you somewhere between ten and thirty dollars and that's delivered so that includes assembly testing through your CM again this is just a range it can be much more than this you'd be hard-pressed to get it much less than this at them all you but it can definitely be more and then there's the cellular module piece of it and so there's the the actual module so all the vendors I had above you know we've seen publicly advertised ranges everywhere from seven to twenty dollars at these volumes so you know if you're using ten to fifteen dollars as an estimate of the module itself that's probably a good place to be but then there's also the sim which is a couple bucks and there's a sim holder which is you know 50 cents to a dollar and then there are level shifters and connectors and by the time where I left off was talking about antennas don't underestimate antennas they're expensive in terms of the percentage cost of your device there are inexpensive antennas out there but antennas are definitely one of those things where you get what you pay for and then batteries we've addressed and the enclosures also be not to not to yeah you know a lot of companies if if you have internal industrial design teams you know that that's not as much of a concern for you and you're already very experienced it with it but if your startup and you're looking at this don't don't forget to consider off-the-shelf enclosures I think so I made a joke about the Takashi enclosure earlier but we like using off-the-shelf enclosures more possible another cost that is important to remember our certification and testing there's a lot of confusion around what certification is required where so I'm going to try to alleviate some of that confusion here but what I would recommend is that you talk to both the carriers that you're working with as well as design houses to get a lot more deer start test houses to get more detail on certification testing costs you know this is one of those things that one when we first started working with cellular IOT was a little bit confusing so I'm gonna try to summarize it here but again make sure you're talking to the carriers talking the test house so PTC are be testing is required by some carriers it's a it's a it's a way for the carriers to kind of push off testing to an accredited testing organization PTC RB tests can can range in in cost but you're typically looking at you know somewhere in the low five figures for the actual test and then additional a few thousand dollars to register the device with PTC RB in the US AT&T requires PTC RB other carriers like Verizon require carrier specific certifications and typically those tests you know can range and the thousands of dollars to two more all the carrier trying to make this a little bit easier and it more expensive because they realize with IOT devices it's not like putting a handset on the network but don't underestimate the time and money that it costs take these tests outside of North America GCF for the global certification forum takes the place of PT CRP and the requirements are pretty similar the requirements for having a GCF certified device again vary from carrier to carrier so make sure you're talking to your carrier communicating with them about what their requirements are GCF has an annual membership fee and the you know so I think it's around 5,000 euro so just keep that in mind as well if you're certifying your device and then there of course the regulatory certifications which again the testing typically cost in the the low five figures attend a thirty thousand dollars or so you know if you were using the the baseband chip set itself and building from the ground up you're probably looking closer to a half a million dollars worth of certification to get that it's combined with you know the regulatory certifications as well as the different carrier certification so just keep that in mind if you have aspirations of building from the baseband chip setup you know that there's a lot of risk mitigation by using something that's pre certified and so the module vendors that that I listed above will typically all certify their devices with carriers and then a lot of the hardware platforms like Lync labs will do pretty certification of a hardware platform that either precludes the need to do additional carrier certification or takes a lot of the risk out of it because you're essentially using a device that already is certified by a carrier so the next big thing that we're going to talk about our costs of data and one of the things that I always have to reiterate with with customers are talking about cost is that these IOT plans are typically very inexpensive on a per device basis and you're talking you know one to two dollars a month you know in higher volume just maybe five dollars a month in lower volumes but what you're for that data for that that dollar is actually much lower so if you'll have a traditional-style cellular plan you made to pay $10 for a gigabyte of data a month so that works out to about a dollar per 100 megabytes with a Ken M plan or an MB iot plan you're looking at you know $1 per megabyte and so you know it could be a hundred times more expensive per byte so efficiently transmitting that data is really really important and a lot of the time you're not actually paying for the data you transmit so even if you're sending 20 bytes of data for your application you're paying for the overhead no I'm not talking about control plane overhead that keeps the cellular network and signaling alive but when talking about is just the protocol overhead so if you implement you know MQTT which is a very efficient way of transmitting data you're still looking at 500 bytes or so of overhead per transmission if you do HTTP you're looking at you know kilobytes of data of overhead if you want to send secure status securely so just keep that in mind I'll talk a little bit about link labs approach here in a bit but you know the data can can be expensive if you're not managing it correctly with these plans then finally there's the the managed service event a lot of carriers have platforms that cover some of this a lot of vendors like like link Labs and others have pieces of this that they manage but each of the different blocks that I have on this slide are all really important to consider about you know when you're building your device over the lifetime of the device so if things like you know Simonton device management typically you can do directly with a carrier but it does require work especially if you're managing tens of thousands of devices managing firmware over-the-air is also very important typically if your device is in the field for years you're gonna have to push for more updates to it there are various ways to do it you know is but it's not as simple as getting a device that's you know where the module itself is lightweight m2m approved and then just doing lightweight m2m typically on the application side you're gonna have to implement your own firmware so over-the-air so just keep that in mind as you're as you're developing your devices for the future that's a big part of it and that can cost you know money as well for the data that you're using or if you're using you know a client for for FOTA they may charge on a monthly basis or on a purchase basis so just keep that in mind as you're thinking about costs and then just more broadly some other risks and challenges this is a relatively new market even though you've been hearing press releases and announcements about the stuff from last couple years I mean components are just now starting to come on the market in any production quantities and so as you're working with vendors make sure you understand their timelines and availabilities make sure you look at that with a skeptical eye and be conservative and you know I would say that any engagement with us be a skeptical about timelines anyone else its software it's hard things slip so you know on the bright side a lot of the stuff that we've been talking about for the last year is available now but you know this it's worth talking to your your vendors about same thing with network availability there's a difference between testing a device on a network and having the network be able to support your application across your customer base everywhere typically the networks are gonna be tested in a couple key markets and then rolled out across the nation or the coverage of the carrier so make sure you're you're asking your carrier the right questions that you're testing your devices on the network you know that we're all used to being able to have a single sim and device that roams globally we're not quite there yet with with this technology it has nothing to do with any technical limitations but it's more to do with inter carrier agreement Vince which markets are actually going to have these networks deployed and then because typically these devices are more streamlined the devices may only support one or two bands and so even you know if carriers have agreements and you have roaming agreements your device may not support all the bands that are necessary for global roaming so we look at this as a market by market and carrier by carrier push at this moment maybe 18 to 24 months from now we can start talking about true global coverage and you know multiple multiple carriers multiple bands support more complex devices just keep in mind though you're also paying for that complexity so if you're going to be supporting multiple bands and multiple sims that's that's going to be a more expensive device I've already touched on data usage and an exposure as you're thinking through plans there are different types of IOT plans out there some of them are you know prepay some of them are month by month you know as you as you think about which plans are are useful to you make sure you really understand your applications data usage it's really important and same thing with with power as I mentioned before you really need to test your application in the field and battery performance can vary based on application specific network specific requirements that aren't always clear at the bench or in the lab so I'm going to talk through and this last bit about link labs approach to helping our customers get their cellular IOT devices on the air well I will say going into this is that this is an approach that we've built based on a lot of our experience implementing low-power devices in the unlicensed band for customers and some of the challenges they've had implementing our hardware this isn't the right approach for everyone if you have a lot of experience implementing cellular devices you may not need some of the pieces that we offer but what I can say is that we've tried to make it as easy as possible to take advantage of the LTM and yo T specific features such as low power as well as optimize the data plans to minimize any sticker shock on your cell bills and we think it's a good approach for it for a lot of the customers that we work with so I'm going to go through the different pieces of it and how we think about building an IOT device so we have a simplified hardware and software interface and what I mean by this is that our module is highly optimized for extremely low power operation and to do that we have we've abstracted some of the different types of interfaces that a module vendor might give you so a typical interface with a module is via 80 commands and what we've done is we've bundled a lot of the different options that you might have to implement using 80 commands and really and just giving you a you RN API and you know firmwares never simple but this is about as simple as it gets you send a wake signal to our module and you send a data it responds with acknowledgment and you can be confident that your data is gotten at least to the network you know we have different power modes and power settings that you can also control via this UART API so rather than having to implement PSM mode on your own we've done that for you where possible we've pre-certified our module with carriers so in some cases you can use this module and tech directly to the network we have included approved khatm SIM cards we've pre-negotiated pricing plans so a lot of this is uh is really to make getting on the network a lot easier for customers and then one of the things that we've also tried to do is we've made it easier to send data efficiently and so you don't really have to make a lot of choices around which protocol you're going to use and you know the different module vendors offer different types of IP stacks that you can use but all those typically have a decent amount of overhead we've tried to to remove some of that for you just to talk a little bit about our efficient communications layer so there are lots of trade-offs when making decisions around which protocols to use one of the things that's really important to our customers and to link Labs is that the communications be secure and so if simply saying we're gonna send raw data in a very efficient way it wasn't enough for us and so what link Labs has done is worked with carriers to essentially develop a private internet connection to your device for you and the reason we've done that is because that way you don't have to implement any high overhead SSL or other types of encryption on the end node because your data is never touching the public Internet and again this isn't for everyone but we think that this is a really good implementation for a lot of our customers who are also very cost conscious when it comes to the amount of data being used just a brief example a typical link labs message using our data efficient communications layer and is going to be transmitting 100 to 200 bytes for a 20-byte payload whereas if you were to do that same thing using HTTP you would be looking at you know upwards of five kilobytes for the same message doing all of the certificate exchanges as well as just the the overhead of the message itself and again security is really really important to us and so we've done everything we can to keep this data secure and from touching the public Internet at all so it basically goes directly from your device to your back-end without any you know any exposure to potential threat vectors and then on the backend side we've tried to simplify device management like I said a lot of operators cellular operators have device management portals and platforms they are various degrees of user friendliness what we've done is we have one single managed service platform that allows you to connect to any cell network that we support with our hardware with a standard set of open api s that allow you to manage your devices the other types of modules that we have in this that are available are things like rules and alerts for devices warnings around data power and data management reporting which will help you with billing as well as a module that allows you to manage over their firmware updates for your devices and so if you're developing an application you have access to this REST API and it allows you the flexibility of having to develop once and then be able to translate that development to whichever type of cell service or or device that you'd like to use that we support so you can develop a CAD M device from Verizon now and develop your application on that and it will work the same way with a MB IOT device for orange in the future maybe that was a bad example an MBI Oh is he device from Vodafone in the future sorry and the reason I say that is because orange is gonna support Ken M primarily first and then you know right before I open it up for additional questions and address some of the questions we got before I wanted to share one example that we've developed in-house using CAD M as well as some of the the battery characteristics of that specific example so we have a technology that we call air finder which is a real-time location system using ble and so in this particular example we have a mobile access point so it's mobile Bluetooth access point that's gathering location data from Bluetooth tags and this access point is you see here on a truck but it's designed to be able to migrate from inside of a building to a loading dock to a truck and it all be battery-powered which typically isn't possible with this type of technology before km and so just this is just the architecture of that system the tags are communicating location and other sensor data to that access point the access point is communicating to a cell network which is then going through conductor and then we'd our own dog food and we use the conductor an API for for the air finder application and you know as you can see with the with the battery calculation this our mobile air finder access point even with a relatively frequent transmission interval so once every five minutes which is typically more than we would expect for an asset that you know is in the back of a truck because the way that air finder works is it only transmits when a device moves you're getting a couple months of battery life and so you know if you change that transmission interval to once an hour you're getting several months of battery life in PSM mode you know these longer use cases would be more for something that's primarily static like a lot of containers or something you know in a laydown yard but you know you can see we give multiple years of battery life with a mobile air finder access point and that's of the access point itself and so compare that to what we've had to do before which is basically an always-on access point it only lasts 12 hours or so on a battery so we have we have a battery backup in those cases but really you would never want to use an always-on access point for a mobile device like this so just uh you know touched on some of this earlier during the intermission period but so what's next you know we're hearing a lot about the subset of 2g technologies Verizon has announced the sunset of both 2g 3G CDMA in 2019 and so LTE M and an MBI ot have come around in a perfect time to for those sunsets I mean two years sounds like a long time but it's not and so what I would suggest is if you have CDMA devices now you start talking to your your vendors talk to us about how to transition you from from your CDMA devices to to khatm devices and I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at some of the costs associated with that as well as the data plans you know I think it open it this way but I think the cost that you'll save transitioning to km will compensate you for some of the pain of the development cost to make that transition you know 3G sunset is a little bit more up in the air I think globally is still a long way away a lot of global carriers still rely on HSPA+ and UMTS for a lot of their communications and so I'm not I'm hesitant to put a timeline on on a 3G sunset probably you know early to mid 2020s is what you'd be looking at but you definitely consult your carrier specifically and then of course there's the the 5g horizon looming and I actually think that's kind of funny because you see tons and tons of press releases about 5g but they're still not an official definition behind it and so all these press releases are different ships and makers or base station providers really jockeying to define with 5g is for themselves and to suit their needs you know so you know when you hear about 5g could mean a lot of different things typically when people are talking about 5g to talking about gigabit LTE so that's like a convergence of fiber and Wireless serving gigabit ethernet you know they're talking about lower latency you typically is going to be in the higher frequency bands so the ranges are going to be shorter you're gonna have more distributed cells you know definitely 5g will have and have spectral efficiency signaling will will more than likely be be more efficient and then also the the concept of dynamic dynamic spectrum axis is probably going to be part of the 5g consideration but but again it's all yet to be defined and so anyone that's putting dates on when 5g is gonna be available you know I would question that and the other thing to remember is that 5g actually isn't anything right now other than kind of the next phase of LTE so it's not like the transition from you know HSPA to LTE which is a different technology 5g will be based on LTE or LTE advanced and so if you're implementing a an LTE M device now you know I don't think you have to worry at all about 5g I think it's will just be subsumed into it one of the tenants behind 5g that some people have talked about is that the concept of being able to communicate with several hundreds of thousands of simultaneous connections for wireless sensors you know on each base station so the you know the idea of worrying about 5g as you're building a Kadim device I think is a little nonsensical so you know what about 5g if you're thinking about a IOT device don't worry about it it will do nothing but improve what you already have okay so I guess I wasn't in trying to get to some questions but but I think since we're over time I'll save the questions for direct responses I think Brian's probably managed to answer a lot of them in real time if you're interested in learning more or or buying a def kit which are available now while supplies last I'll put it that way they are actually selling really quickly and we're already having to do another spin of a production def kits you can get them directly from us at our at our store you can get them at digi-key and we're also distributed by feature and arrow who don't have deaf kids in stock right now but if you happen to work for future narrow you can you can start bugging your your product marketing managers to get some of those in stock for you guys to get to get out to your to your customers so thank you all for the time apologies for the technical difficulties earlier we'll do our best to merge these two and get out a single webinar that you guys can can view and pass around all your friends thank you

3 Comments

  1. Engineer Muhammad Ayoub Kamal said:

    which Simulator is best for LTE-M and NB-IoT

    June 28, 2019
    Reply
  2. Jan Geirnaert said:

    Very good summary

    June 28, 2019
    Reply
  3. Link Labs said:

    Slides Here: https://www.slideshare.net/BrianRay10/link-labs-ltem-nbiot-hype-webinar-slides

    June 28, 2019
    Reply

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