Current State of Quantum Computing – Computerphile

28 Comments

  1. Kenichi Mori said:

    Qualcomm Point Degree.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  2. Adam said:

    Cool bruh. But have you ever tried DMT?

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  3. Gainster said:

    Isn't a quantum computer the same as a regular computer but instead using the spins of say a photon to represent a bit unlike conventional computers which use a voltage?

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  4. Mark Freeman said:

    …So really we should call them QPU's ? Quantum Processing Units

    May 25, 2019
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  5. Jonathan Eisenbeiss said:

    Loved the fact that you just let the expert talk. Made the video very informative and very precise.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  6. waptek0 said:

    1:26 BUT GPU's are not advertised to run on faerie dust!

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  7. Randy Arellanes said:

    Well it's obvious that nothing is going to become of quantum computing.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  8. hello world said:

    So what will people actually do with a quantum computer?

    I would want to know concrete examples and why you would choose the quantum computer to do exactly that thing.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  9. Vaggelis Basoukas said:

    If sciense fabricate a new material that could allow a new CPU with the same advadages BUT to work in normal computers temperature we will have Quantum computers.Although a very importand question is not asked so far.If we can create a so powerfull CPU, what could happen if we overclock it ?

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  10. Alex Moreno said:

    This is probably the best short, nontechnical video on quantum computing that I've seen

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  11. Get Rich By 2020 said:

    What cryptographic protocol is best suited for IoT? Directed Acyclic Graphs? Hash tables? Blockchains?

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  12. Peter D said:

    mmhhmm

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  13. jose mourinho said:

    So if quantum CPUs don't conceptually "multi-core" (to a power rather than linearly) with additional qubits, then how exactly do QPUs work? I know roughly how they work, quantum logic gates, superpositions of superpositions, entanglement, interference and so on. I'm also familiar with applications such as optimization (traveling salesman) and modeling of quantum, or natural systems (molecules, fundamental particles, etc). My background is physics/finance not computer science. From a physics POV I think of superposition and especially superposition of superpositions (e.g. young's double slit) as implying multiple processes simultaneously – so the electron or photon exhibits wave-particle duality and in some sense travels all possible paths before deciding upon a definite outcome upon observation, an outcome that is influenced by past and future events as well as the present (evidenced by the clearly defined interference patterns). This is analogous to qubits being 0 and 1 at the same time (a superposition) but that means the value could be anything between 0 and 1 until we measure it. Does adding qubits not allow the system to solve branching math problems by branching out probabilities (superpositions of superpositions) in a similar way to an electron in young's double slit? That is to say when you ask a QPU to perform an action the qubits in a sense know the answer and all possible answers to the question upon input, the perceived delay is just how long it takes the observer (measurement, output) to experience the output in their reality.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  14. ERD Epoch said:

    Its scary…. computers in the 70's were size of a room, they ran off binary. Look at where we are now with binary computers.. In 40 years time we will have quantium computers inside of what we call a laptop now.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  15. lkajsdf l;kasjdf said:

    Why are they still so big they should be able to start making them smaller thanks to higher-order topological insulator and time crystals. These things fix the high temp super conductor problem and coherence problems respectively

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  16. SupremePancakes said:

    well the title of this video is Current State of Quantum Computing not Introductory Course to Quantum Computing isn't it? He actually answered the question. I like this guy. He sounds like my (American) professors and makes a lot of references to industry.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  17. Connect to Soul said:

    😇 Thank you for all your beneficial video, it certainly is greatly valued and I definitely value your hard work !👍

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  18. Get Rich By 2020 said:

    When will you be able to break SHA256 encryption?

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  19. Don Kiwi said:

    The current state of quantum computing is a superposition. There's no way to know with certainty where it will be going.

    May 25, 2019
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  20. Mild Soul said:

    Why does the light make him look so orange

    May 25, 2019
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  21. CreeDo Lala said:

    can someone expand on the robustness to noise issue he mentioned? I remember hearing in another video, maybe a computerphile video, that there are two types of quantum computer… one of them gives correct and consistent answers every time, while the other one is somehow not a "true" quantum computer because the process is somehow subject to error and inconsistency. So you don't always get correct answers. Would that be the noise they're referring to? and would that mean that the type of quantum computer he's referring to cannot be used for problems that need a single specific and accurate answer like cryptographic problems? are we ever going to reach that level of computing?

    May 25, 2019
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  22. testthewest123 said:

    Could a quantum computer be used (better than regular computers) for chess?

    May 25, 2019
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  23. Lázaro Carvalhaes said:

    What does the data set you feed a quantum device with look like? I mean, is there a math treatment like a DAC between the two interfaces or can it deal with binary logic just as well as the electronic ones?

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  24. Joshua Penner said:

    I would have liked some discussion on D-Wave's quantum computer. Aren't they planning on making a 2000 qubit quantum computer? Seems to me that D-Wave is worthy to be discussed.

    May 25, 2019
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  25. metal wellington said:

    This was not explained very well.

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  26. 8iaventri said:

    I notice that I don’t use the letter Q in my life as much as I now realize that I have been needing to.

    Positively life changing

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  27. Joshua Folly said:

    Yeah, well I "work" for Quantum Silicon in Alberta, and we'll have 500 qbits in a year. Room temp. Birches

    May 25, 2019
    Reply
  28. Dave Dogge said:

    D.Wave is simulated quantum computing and they know it !

    May 25, 2019
    Reply

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